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Martin is the project manager for a small new product development project at his company. After some time, audits reveal that the quality of the finished product, if it continues along its current trend, will be poor. The people on his project team are skilled and intelligent individuals who have worked on projects like this many times in the past, but the new process they are required to follow, although much better than the previous process, seems to be getting in their way.

When I come across the same situation in my company where the team feels that a quality process is getting in their way, should I change the process? Or do I keep the process in place and resolve the matter another way? In what way? Why?

  • Is it TRUE or FALSE? – George May 9 '17 at 18:01
  • I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it seems to not have an actual, project-management-related problem to solve. – Sarov May 9 '17 at 18:21
  • Hi, Sarov. I please need assistance in this matter? I am studying and this is a question and I cant seem to wrap my head around the answer? PLEASE could you try and help me to understand the question and the answer . . . . In other words, whether TRUE or FALSE, WHY would he change the process or why would he not change the process and what would he then do to resolve the issue if he does not change the process? – George May 9 '17 at 18:24
  • The project management problem for me, in this case, is when I come across the same situation in my company where the team feels that a quality process is getting in their way, do I change the process? OR do I keep the process in place and resolve the matter another way? PLEASE ASSIST? – George May 9 '17 at 18:27
  • Okay, I've updated your question with your comments. – Sarov May 9 '17 at 18:46
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The first thing you need to do is determine why the team seems to be having difficulties adjusting to/accepting the new process. It may be that they have valid concerns that were not previously taken into account. It may be that the new process is flawed in some way. It may be that they don't understand the process or its benefits properly. It may be that they simply don't like anything new.

Before making such a decision, you need to gather information. In doing so, make sure to avoid bias as much as possible. One way to do this is by challenging assumptions, such as:

although much better than the previous process, seems to be getting in their way

'much better' in what way? Who decided that? If it was anyone other than the team, then I would hesitate to assume that the team sees it as a better process. You should find out what makes it 'much better', and whether or not that's actually a viable concern, both in general and for your specific company and situation.

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  • Thank you very much, Sarov. That was my idea and motivation. But this is now a question in a multiple answer test, where the answer is either TRUE or FALSE. So with your expert judgement, what would you be inclined to choose. Taking into consideration that the team is skilled, intelligent and experienced in the industry, I would be inclined to choose FALSE, as the team would then be able to adjust the process to not be in their way. AND the process is necessary as it corrects the quality problems the project had previously, before implementing the said process? – George May 9 '17 at 19:08
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    @George Given it's an exam, the only really 'correct' answer is 'whatever the examiner believes is the correct answer.' If you want my opinion, though, then I'd say that if an experienced team has an issue with a process, all else being equal, it'd make sense to ditch the process, since it probably has problems. – Sarov May 9 '17 at 19:36
  • THANK YOU SAROV. I really appreciate your assistance . . . . and totally agree with your comments and motivations. – George May 9 '17 at 19:48

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