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In my current company, Dynamic Systems Development Method (DSDM) is the Agile framework chosen for delivery. Scrum is followed as the Agile process within DSDM.

Can we really use Scrum as an agile methodology in DSDM? If so, how to mitigate these conflicting processes between Scrum and DSDM?

I have found conflicting roles / processes / functionalities between Scrum and DSDM, such as:

  1. We have Business roles to supplement the product owner in Scrum and no dedicated product owner in the team.

  2. We have teams of less than 3 for individual projects but conflicts the Scrum team size minimum requirement.

  3. Product backlogs are primarily prioritized based on MoSCoW and not rank ordered numerically.

  4. Timeboxing is used instead of Iteration.

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    What do you mean by "Scrum is followed as the Agile process within DSDM"? DSDM is its own methodology, with its own roles, artifacts, events and ceremonies, and rules. – Thomas Owens Mar 5 at 12:52
  • @ThomasOwens - For the Evolutionary Development Phase, the company is following the Scrum methodology to execute the Iteration with sprint planning, standups, review and retro. – Mustaque Ali Mar 5 at 15:06
  • That's fine that you're taking some events from Scrum to help, but you aren't doing Scrum. You're doing DSDM. Why are you trying to fit the two together? – Thomas Owens Mar 5 at 15:17
  • @ThomasOwens - There is a mixup of terminologies in the company and that is driving some confusion among the team. – Mustaque Ali Mar 5 at 15:31
  • @ThomasOwens - my question is - can we take only the scrum events / rules whichever will fit into this practice.. like whatever the management is okay with? – Mustaque Ali Mar 5 at 15:33
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In theory

Scrum is quite clear: Scrum is a framework and you cannot drop any part of it without compromising its integrity.

On the other hand DSDM states that it can integrate a wide variety of tools and techniques.

Conclusion

So, while you cannot "use Scrum inside DSDM", you're still free to use Scrum terminolgies and techniques as long as the way you use them is clear (and common) to everyone.

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