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Using Scrum, the Project Manager role doesn't exist. The Scrum Team can build a product by itself. Essentially, the Project Manager's tasks are more or less divided between the Product Owner and the Scrum Master.

But what happens when in addition to a product, you also have projects? By that I mean that a product is built through multiple projects. For example, client A and B are both paying for product 1, with different deadlines and priorities of course. Does the Product Owner of product 1 should manage the scope date and budget of project A and B? Is it a good place to introduce someone who has the role of a Project Manager, to manage project A? If not, what happens when there will be too many projects to be handled by Product Owner 1? If there is a Product Owner for each project, they aren’t real PO because they don’t have power over the product they are delivering.

Another example of a similar situation that could require a different answer is the following: Let's say a service company business model is to build websites for clients. They build a website, ship it and then consider that product to be done. But at some point, they decide to build a "website builder internal SDK" to accelerate future websites development. I'm sure we agree this "SDK product" is worthy of its own Product Owner and whole Scrum Team. Should each service be under the responsibility of a Product Owner that manages the dates by talking to the "SDK" Product Owner?

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Using Scrum, the Project Manager role doesn't exist.

True.

However, there is nothing to stop you from having a project management capability within your Scrum team. This does not have to be a particular individual. It could be several team members that have project management skills, such as budgeting, working with outsourced companies, etc.

Essentially, the Project Manager's tasks are more or less divided between the Product Owner and the Scrum Master.

Not really. The Project Manager's tasks (where they exist) are owned by the team. It would be up to the team to decide how this work is done.

Does the Product Owner of product 1 should manage the scope date and budget of project A and B? Is it a good place to introduce someone who has the role of a Project Manager, to manage project A?

The Product Owner deals with a product backlog. That could consist of work items for multiple projects (if it fits with your organisations way of working).

For example, the backlog could look like:

Project 1 Item X

Project 1 Item Y

Project 2 Item M

Project 1 Item Z

Project 2 Item N

The Product Owner would be making priority calls on the various work items based on what they feel will deliver the most value and make the most sense.

If not, what happens when there will be too many projects to be handled by Product Owner 1?

Then a conversation takes place. In some organisations this would be a conversation between the Product Owner and stakeholders. Other organisations might have a senior Product Owner role, that has responsibility for looking at the big picture across multiple product teams.

Mike Cohn talks about one such setup here.

But at some point, they decide to build a "website builder internal SDK" to accelerate future websites development.

This is a great topic for conversation amongst your Scrum teams. Shall we spread the work across the teams? Shall we have a dedicated team for this work?

Personally my preference would be to develop the SDK as a part of delivering a product. This helps to ensure that you retain the link between backlog items and end-user value. This helps when prioritising work and retains the Scrum approach of having a potentially shippable increment at the end of each sprint.

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Project Maager and Product Owner are two different roles which I think you already understand. Project Manager takes care of execution; how smoothly can the project be finished on time. Product Owner on the other hand will be more inclined towards how the product can be made better, what new features can be added. So yes, in a way, when you have Scrum, the scrum master plays a role similar to a project manager. If it is a large product, it will broken down into phases with possibly different project managers, but product owner should be the same. Another perspective on this would be to consider the job of product owner as somewhat long term in which he or she tracks the progress of the product as a whole irrespective of whether a current project is in progress or not.

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Using Scrum, the Project Manager role doesn't

Correct, but the inexistence of the role doesn’t mean inexistence of responsibilities and the project management tasks. This is largely taken by the product owner. Organisations are finding these days that there is a misinterpretation to what Scrum means in terms of Project Management, and most of these organisations are bringing PMs back to do what the PO or Scrum Master are not educated or prepared to do, which is Project Management.

The Scrum Team can build a product by itself

Correct, and I would be surprised if they couldn’t. That’s the reason it exists, to build the product! PMs, Scrum Masters or PO don’t build anything.

Essentially, the Project Manager's tasks are more or less divided between the Product Owner and the Scrum Master.

Indeed and most often these tasks are poorly performed by both.

But what happens when in addition to a product, you also have projects?

You shouldn’t have a product without a project, regardless if you deliver it using scrum, waterfall or manuscripts in toilet paper. No product delivered by an organisation if not through a project. Ongoing operations don’t produce products, projects does.

By that I mean that a product is built through multiple projects.

Recipe for disaster. You can have individual components of the product being built by separate projects, which is called a Program (two or more projects delivered in coordination to achieve a common objective), but given the unique nature of a product of a project, it cannot be delivered by multiple projects.

For example, client A and B and are both paying for product 1, with different deadlines and priorities of course.

Client A and B need to talk to each other and nominate ONE product owner. The nominated product owner need to manage both parties expectations and isolate the delivery team from the conflicting priorities. The PO should agree the priorities with the sponsors and then bring the list of priorities to the scrum team

Does the Product Owner of product 1 should manage the scope date and budget of project A and B?

As mentioned before, there is no such situation where 2 projects produces the same product. You may be referring to 2 different projects and YES, the PO should pass the priorities to both scrum teams

Is it a good place to introduce someone who has the role of a Project Manager, to manage project A?

It is essential as a the Project Manager will relief the PO from administrative tasks and allow the PO to purely focus on the product and business value.

If not, what happens when there will be too many projects to be handled by Product Owner 1?

Product Owner need to speak with project sponsors to either bring Project Managers or re-structure the projects/product so that more POs can be nominated.

If there is a Product Owner for each project, they aren’t real PO because they don’t have power over the product they are delivering.

Every project need to have ONE Product Owner and each project should produce a UNIQUE product. Anything different to this means organisational mess.

Another example of a similar situation that could require a different answer is the following: Let's say a service company business model is to build websites for clients. They build a website, ship it and then consider that product to be done. But at some point, they decide to build a "website builder internal SDK" to accelerate future websites development. I'm sure we agree this "SDK product" is worthy of its own Product Owner and whole Scrum Team. Should each service be under the responsibility of a Product Owner that manages the dates by talking to the "SDK" Product Owner?

Different products, different projects, POTENTIALLY different POs.

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