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a) We have total 6 Sprints constituting a business quarter.

b) We are releasing every 2 Sprints (or earlier) by means of CI/CD.

c) We have to deliver a new feature in the next quarter for which we have a Theme/Epic.

The storyboarding session for this theme/epic - We would like to host this during Sprint 6 this quarter, so that we can establish (or near accomplish) the shared understanding of our feature next quarter. However, we don't know if this is better done in Sprint 1 for next quarter.

But our question here - Is this the correct approach for Storyboarding in our Sprints?

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The answer to the question of when to storyboard is as late as possible, but not too late.

When following an agile approach we aim to be good at responding to change. As such, we try not to put too much detail on our backlog too early. Instead, we look to continuously refine work as we go along, having it ready just in time. This is why the Scrum framework suggests as much as 10% of the time in a sprint is spent preparing for future sprints.

Each team experiments with how it prepares future work until it finds a good balance between not too early and not too late.

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If the expected outcome of the storyboarding session is not only a common understanding of the theme/epic, but also a set of stories, and if you want to be able to work on those stories starting from Sprint 1 next quarter because that theme/epic is the most important thing for the business to work on, then you should definitely have the storyboarding session before the start of that first sprint.

You might even plan that session even earlier than sprint 6, so that the team has enough time left to further refine the stories and create estimates for them.

You should want to have things organized such that you have about 2 or 3 sprints worth of stories in a state that they can be picked up immediately and those should be the stories that are the most valuable to the business. That way, there is always something to pick up if the team completes the work faster than estimated, but you also don't have invested much time in work that is so far away that it gets affected easily by shifting priorities.

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  • I see - you are suggesting that it's a reasonable balance and not necessary "Set in stone" ? – ha9u63ar May 30 at 16:15
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    @ha9u63ar, very little about Scrum is set in stone, so yes. – Bart van Ingen Schenau May 30 at 16:51

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