6

I also don’t feel it’s of any benefit for my team. You think there is no benefit in a coach? What are you, perfect? "Inspect and adapt" is the core of Scrum and you are flat out rejecting it. It would be good if you could embrace it instead. Let them do their jobs, think about their suggestions and improve your team. Because let's be clear about ...


6

It depends on the event. People from outside the Scrum Team should, generally speaking, attend an event when they have something valuable to contribute to the team within the context of the event. The only event that I'd have a strong objection to someone outside the Scrum Team attending is the Sprint Retrospective. In order for the retrospective to be ...


6

TL;DR Nope, nope, nope. Just "no." The question is based on the faulty assumption that you can force change on other people (hint: you can't), and is wishing what seems likely to be poor team composition into the cornfield. Why You're Asking the Wrong Question The Product Owner that I am working with has agreed "to try this self-organising ...


4

If they feel that the environment is safe and friendly - they will speak up. I noticed that such environment is created when people have discussions on personal level. The thing that I see almost always works is going to lunch together. People get closer as they start discussing personal stuff too, which makes them more comfortable. Though frequently the ...


3

There are two different aspects that you want to focus on in this retrospective: product failure and the work team members have put in. For product failure, one format could be a timeline of all the product decisions taken during the project. Collect data of all the things that have happened with the product, decisions take, feedback received, etc., and map ...


3

Here are some ideas that may be applicable: Rather than offering choices, present the situation to the team and have them deduce their options. Such ownership of the problem will make it easier for people to commit to a path—even if they do not fully agree. Make sure that dissenting voices are heard and their concerns acknowledged. Partner with them to ...


3

With regard to the daily scrum ceremony, the team should decide who attends because it is their meeting. If the presence of other people would be a distraction then that's a good reason for them not to be there. By the way the team may also prefer not to have the Scrum Master present. The SM's presence is not required unless the SM is also a developer, in ...


2

Something else to consider here. e.g.: "They want to improve the frequency and quality of interactions basically." "No, there is something more." Outside of work-related settings, real people never describe their [social ...] interactions in this way. Therefore, try to guide the team to try to articulate the work-related [...


2

Under what circumstances should outsiders attend a scrum team’s ceremonies? There's no rule preventing somebody from attending, and - in theory - you're not discussing anything secret or dangerous that shouldn't be leaked to outsiders. That said, it's obvious that you cannot allow outsiders to interfere with the ceremonies. Any questions they have, the input ...


2

One solution might be to use Kanban, without sprints, and focus on the importance of the work, its prioritization and order, and less so on building estimates. Building in Sprints can also work, but the focus would probably still need to shift (see also this question). Another solution would be to split your work into "exploratory" work and "...


2

Taking a different approach from Barnaby, what I would suggest is to focus on what is needed from her, rather than what is problematic from her. (Or combine the two approaches.) Go over the Scrum Guide with the entire Team, paying emphasis to the section about roles' responsibilities. Then, if/when she starts asserting her presence into the Team (in a way ...


2

While it does seem like a psychological question and doesn't relate to methodologies, I don't agree it's a dead-end and you can't change how people behave. But first you need to understand the underlying reasons for such behaviour, could be: She doesn't think others will do a good enough job She wants to make things quickly and believes that while others ...


1

As already mentioned, you cannot convince a dominating personality to not be dominating. I'm also not sure she sees the world as you do, which is: One in which she directs and manages the team but also largely takes responsibility for the output and upkeep or alternatively we can work together to build a self-organising team to take ownership and ...


1

We will be working in 2 week sprint cycles One other thing that may be worth considering is having a longer sprint cycle. For example, if your sprints were 4 weeks long, would that give you more time to do the research work and still deliver value within a sprint? However, I am not really clear on the research phase of the project. If we need to research ...


1

The key will be to have ways to highlight the impact of the Product Owner micro-managing. If you can't demonstrate the impact, there is little to stop them from drifting back to their old ways. For example: "Sally was blocked today as they were waiting on the Product Owner to decide what to do next. If they were able to make that decision themselves or ...


1

Since you asked about specific interactions: So asking and offering for help, pairing and working together, speaking up in ceremonies. Sometimes people need a little help getting comfortable with different forms of interaction. So creating opportunities for them to practice working in pairs, or initiating interactions, or speaking up in groups can be helpful ...


1

TL;DR Agile frameworks like Scrum are founded on empirical control and validated learning, so "failing fast" is not inherently a negative. In fact, canceling a project that can't be salvaged is often the best way to avoid chasing sunk costs. However, understanding the Five W's of the failed project can lead to process improvements if and only if ...


1

You're conflating several competing objectives here. Celebrating the hard work or worrying about future, less challenging work is not an objective of a retrospective. If you want to celebrate the work performed, then go celebrate. That would involve food, drink, and someplace nice to socialize. If you want to worry about future work, that would involve ...


1

As an agile coach the first thing I would do is ask the Scrum Master and the team if they want me to be present. If they say no, that is the end of the story. If they don't mind me being present then I may also ask them how they would like me to interact. Typically there are three approaches I suggest: I interact freely throughout the ceremony I keep quiet ...


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