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7

Short introduction + practice run I would write a short presentation about what Story Points are and how they are used (a summary of this explanation should work nicely; the dogs example is really intuitive). I would also mention some pitfalls or common mistakes just to get some of them out of the way, since people will have a few questions. Trying to ...


4

Customers prefer a FFP at times because of they believe it helps to control costs. In some ways it does; however, in many cases they end up paying more, either because of the contingency built in the price and / or the vendor submitting one change request after another. And the change requests typically have a lot of built-in margin since the CRs are not ...


4

How I do it: I set up a grid. Across the top I have a size scale. I actually don't use numbers at first. Rather, I use ice cream: taster cup, single scoop, double scoop, sundae, banana split, bucket. I'll come back to why later. On the left side, I have a list of things. Usually I use household chores and tasks, but you could even use real backlog items. I ...


3

TL;DR In most agile frameworks, you measure success or failure based on measurable outcomes, not utilization rates or external process governance. In fact, measuring anything other than objective outcomes will be counter-productive. If you find yourself asking whether a Scrum Team is working "hard enough" for the money you're spending, you're ...


3

Iterative delivery. If each sprint the customer is testing and potentially releasing a working increment of functionality then they have regular evidence of the quality of product, they can feedback on any problems and they can prioritise future work as needed. Also the customer has the option to walk away if they choose and keep what was already delivered. ...


2

There's a difference between being a software vendor and being a service provider for bespoke applications development. You seem to be describing a service-provider kind of relationship. A fixed-price (FFP) contract does not mean the customer only pays a fixed price. It means the customer and supplier agree to negotiate on price and scope and that the ...


2

In Scrum, the Sprint Planning occurs at the start of every Sprint. In most implementations of Scaled Scrum, the Sprint Planning is synchronized among the teams and often has a shared component where the teams align their plans for the upcoming Sprint. In SAFe, this activity is represented by Iteration Planning on the team level. SAFe's Innovation and ...


1

Todd A. Jacobs gave a good example of how to handle this within a Scrum context, but this isn't entirely a question about Scrum. The broader question is if you can trust the vendor or not, no matter if they are using Scrum or something else. Trust + time + inspection I'll formulate my answer by using an analogy. Let's say you go visit some third world ...


1

Everybody (obviously) answered yes to getting a lawyer involved. But nobody answered your first question: How does the software development company draw up a contract that protects the company's interests (doesn't cause losses)? However, besides for the legalese, the contract is going to need an addendum; specifically, a detailed Technical Spec. This will ...


1

I strongly advise you to engage an attorney who is skilled at creating this sort of contract. (And, in general, in leading clients through this sort of business negotiation. (The old-fashioned word for an attorney was, after all, "counselor.") An attorney is "an expert in the law." You are not. I stumbled-upon my personal attorney, Tom,...


1

As you mentioned yourself, the problem with software development is that there are a lot of unknowns. These introduce variability in what will be built (which people assume will be fixed). What's worse, is that in the beginning, both parties have trouble knowing what is needed and what will change after the project is started (and things will definitely ...


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