New answers tagged

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A retrospective should not ban topics. And a retrospective must not waste people's time, either. With that said, what you could do is categorise the retrospective items according to different influence categories: Items the team can change Items the team can influence Everything else / Items the team needs to accept Once you have done that, the team ...


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The Scrum team alone cannot solve every impediment. It is a good idea to have some kind of escalation path for issues that are outside of the control of the team, but are recurring and damaging. As a Scrum Master I would often look to escalate this kind of issue using a reporting process. For example, I might produce a sprint report that says something ...


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Is this a standard or good practice in facilitating a retro to 'censor' known issues like this? Yes and no. I feel it's wrong to censor anything, especially talking about impediments at a retrospective. On the other hand, discussing the whole issue again and again and again when nothing has changed is unproductive and wasteful. As an example: in my old ...


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You need to update Task with Actual dates like Actual start and Finish dates. if you update MSP task saying that 100% Complete, simply it will follow Planned dates as System does not understand whether task is finished different dates rather than Planned dates. if your actual dates are different than planned dates, user has manually inputs actual dates.


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If the same impediment is being raised Sprint after Sprint, that brings up a few questions. Is someone actively working on resolving the impediment? Maybe it can't be resolved within the Scrum Team and maybe it can't be resolved in a Sprint, but what is being done to minimize its impact and ultimately resolve the underlying issues? During Sprint Planning, ...


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Censoring an impediment from the retrospective doesn't solve it. As it looks to be a major impediment that's blocking the team, maybe it's worthwhile to arrange a separate meeting to analyze the problem to get a shared understanding and find a way out of the impediment? The advantages of planning a specific meeting are: You can focus on the impediment and ...


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In this context, my usage (which I may have seen in some agile training or resource, but equally well might have simply carried over from a different context) is that there are N days in the sprint, and the days in the sprint are numbered from 1 to N. This is practical because it is independent of sprint length. So following the canonical placement in the ...


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In this context, it is borrowing from math (specifically algebra) as n is used in sequences. Sorry for some math speak, but it works like this: t(n) = t(n-1) + 10 This would mean that the current element in the sequence equals the last element in the sequence plus 10 (if the last element was 15, this element would be 25). Oddly, even though this is where ...


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(From the linked Question) For instance, Sprint N+1 Planning the day before Sprint N Demo/Retro would fix my problem, but is probably a bad idea This is a commonly-used convention (not just in Project Management), where "N" means "some exact number, but for our purposes we don't care exactly which number", while "N+1" means "one larger than that number ...


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An additional possible approach to consider, which could be taken alongside the admirable suggestions here to split up the feature, is to 'release' sections of the feature but with a 'switch' to allow the feature to be turned off, or only turned on for specific users/in specific circumstances when the first parts of this are released. This may help if you ...


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As a Scrum Master your responsibility is to ensure your team is following the Scrum framework. The best way to do this is to explain the consequences of not following Scrum and how it will impact on the organisation. Scrum talks about a potentially releasable Increment at the end of each sprint. The value with this approach is that: You can get regular ...


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In Scrum team works to provide the shippable product as an output of each Sprint. It is recommended to use the same timebox in each Sprint (1 to 4 week). According to statement PM wants to put the feature in a separate branch and allow users to test for 1-2 months. Clearly, it's a product delivery from the Scrum team (assuming Scrum team already tested at ...


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Your team produces a potentially shippable product increment at the end of each sprint. Whether this is then subjected to acceptance tests and actually being released is up to the client. Of course, you split the big feature into product backlog items that can be handled within the Scrum framework so that it will take several sprints until it is completed, ...


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I'm assuming you mean MVP (hope that's a correct assumption). This article sums up what a good MVP should deliver well: Serve at least one specific audience Address at least one key problem Have a well-designed User Interface (<- this feels open to interpretation) Be easy to build and launch quickly From that perspective, I could see building an ...


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I’ve found that the Scrum Master role and the ADM role create conflict within the Scrum Team. Roles clearly need to be defined otherwise the Scrum Master position is compromised. The Scrum Master is task with protecting the team from outside and inside distraction. To me the ADM as I mentioned above can falls into this. Not a fan of this role.


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I have some experience with migrations. What I can suggest is the following. FIRST and very first, create a product oriented work breakdown structure. Don't do this alone, do it with the support of the team. About the WBS, I'd put in the first level of my WBS the following: Website: So you can decompose further the features to deliver (frontend, ...


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There's a school of thought that says: Don't estimate bug fixes, chores and spikes. This is because points should only be awarded to work that adds value to the business. Developers should be given an incentive to complete the most valuable work. They get kudos for burning down story points because those stories represent direct business value. By ...


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As a decision of this problem can be the following steps: Preparation Move the common code under some version control repo (git for example). In the code of every projects (Android, iOS etc) add the link to the common code repo. Get the last current version of the common code from repo for every projects. Daily work Let's imagine that we want to update ...


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This sounds like a primarily code-oriented problem. You want components of your application to be loosely coupled or completely decoupled. Using good programming principles like single responsibility and dependency-inversion, changing something in one system is not necessarily immediately impactful to everything else. From here, whether your common code is a ...


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One of the golden rules of continuous delivery is: If something is hard, do it frequently At the moment you are concerned that releasing to the various platforms will impact on quality. If you can alleviate that fear then the problem goes away. I would be looking to: Use extensive automated regression testing Integrate and test frequently (perhaps even ...


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Todd covers quite well (+1!) the reason from an agile team perspective. I'd like to add a parallel perspective to it - why a developer would want to work on an agile team. First of all, agile is not for every developer. Not that's a problem per se, as there's still a lot of projects out there that are follows Command and Control approaches (some even using ...


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TL;DR In my experience, all-or-nothing cloning projects are often a trap companies fall into when they have a non-agile mindset. It often indicates an underlying struggle with process introspection, workflow adaptation, or acceptance of the trade-offs inherent in the iterative/incremental development model. Don't allow the organization to fall into this ...


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At scale, you might want to look at a Hierarchical Backlogs. This way each team can have their own manageable backlog to groom/plan but there's an overall backlog that can be utilized for things like increment planning. Kenneth S. Rubin (author of Essential Scrum: A Practical Guide to the Most Popular Agile Process) has a good chapter about Which and How ...


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Velocity was never intended as a performance measure. It is designed specifically to help teams to estimate their capacity in future sprints. If it is being used to criticise the performance of teams then you have a problem. What this highlights is not that there is an issue with the Fibonacci scale, but how important it is that everyone involved is ...


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I've seen team-specific backlogs work well where multiple teams have been working on distinct areas of a very large application. The fact that it got that large in the first place is more of an issue for software architecture, so shouldn't be an immediate concern. However, that does also encourage silos..those teams know the areas of the product that on ...


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If we make a pretty bold assumption that the 3rd party system is absolutely perfect and there's nothing about it that needs to be improved in the in-house version, then this initially appears to be a project where there is a very comprehensive spec for what needs to happen in any state - the existing system. If the business logic is all sound but there's ...


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If I was in this situation, I would start with a simple proposal: run both applications side-by-side. There are a few different ways to start. You can either start with the most used functionality in the 3rd party application and move this data and functionality over first or you can start with the functions that are most painful to accomplish in the 3rd ...


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Now that developer has to defend herself as to why her velocity has dropped 400%. If the developer is having to defend velocity changes on sprint by sprint stats alone, that is completely wrong. The team will know if someone isn't putting in the effort needed. It might be that a three, or five, sprint rolling average might be a more realistic measure. ...


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IT IS! People forget this or gloss over it all the time. Pushing authority down the hierarchy has a lot of benefits for the organization and the individual but it is definitely harder - and for some people, it isn't worth it. For those that find it worth it, some of the most common reasons are: 1) Pride - Along with ownership comes a pride in the work that ...


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Why should a developer want to work Agile? Because a properly-implemented agile framework improves the pacing of a project and the sustainability of the developers' work efforts. It also increases collaboration between developers and stakeholders. If it doesn't do all of these things, then the team (or the organization) is probably Doing Agile Wrong™. ...


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You can successfully use Agile being one person or more. Barnaby Golden once told me You can adopt agile with any size of team as it is an approach to doing software development. When it comes to Scrum, like you mention, it is advised for teams of at least 3; also, using Kanban with just 1 person can have outcomes far from expectations. Still, someone ...


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Estimating stories seems like a waste, especially if I'm the only developer, there's no concept of a release/goal/deadline This might be where you get the most bang for your buck. It might seem like a waste of time, but if you do your estimations you'll be able to see how much you should take on for each sprint. In lieu of Story Points you might want to ...


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Agile practices do have Team Leader or Technical Lead. But it's not necessary to actively recruit a new high profile technical lead, because among the agile team members who have vast experience on project topics might be someone to come in front and take the lead for specific project modules. In my view, an agile team should have a Requirement Analyst Lead ...


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So, I need to assess the health of the engineering process as it currently is and make recommendations for how to get it to a better state moving forward. As this is an agile environment the questions I would be asking include: Are the teams themselves failing to self-improve? Are the teams empowered to fix their own problems? Is the working environment ...


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If I understand your situation correct you are looking for a way to help teams to talk about/analyze/assess what areas to improve and give the people that supports these teams (mangers, coachers, etc.) a high level summary of what’s working and what’s not. Based on this I would recommend you to look at the Squad Health Check model by Henrik Kniberg. What ...


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I'm going to frame challenge a bit. This is a Finance and Legal question, not a PM question. What will be 'acceptable to auditors' depends on if you're publicly traded and if so what regulatory bodies you are subject to. e.g., for GAAP SEC Filings in the US you will find language to the effect of "time tracked directly to the project." I think you would ...


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Both of the metrics that you cite (along with a probability) answer the question "When will this piece of work be done?" When your stakeholders ask that question, you have an answer to give them based on your data. Don't think of it as providing metrics to stakeholders. In my experiences, they don't care about metrics. They care about how long it will take ...


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Perhaps you can send out a survey to all your stakeholders every time you do a release. This encourages more engagement than simply an email. There are a few very nice tools available to make surveys more fun. Perhaps you can have a small banner at the top of the system (if this is possible) with a link to a page which explains the value delivered in the ...


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If you have already started the sprint - i.e. its an active sprint and you want to see the 'burn-down chart' in hour instead of story points, then you can go to the settings of the board in Jira you can change the burn-down to look at hours instead of story points.


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No they don't. A scrum master and an agile coach are both leaders but don't necessarily need technical skills to be effective. I think it's useful for the members of the team to have varying levels of technical ability, some senior developers and some more junior ones but in my experience there doesn't need to have a designated leader if the team is a quite ...


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I will answer your question with reference to Scrum. In Scrum there are just three roles: Scrum Master, Product Owner and Development Team member. There is no stated leader, which is done deliberately as leadership is seen to be distributed across the whole Scrum team. For example, when working on a particularly database-heavy project one of the team ...


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One of the simplest ways to do this is to ignore individual developers and instead base all your costs on sprints. Given a known team and a known sprint duration you have an easy to generate cost figure. It helps if the team tries to avoid mixing products worked on within sprints as this complicates the cost. But if you can arrange it so that sprints are ...


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Different teams estimate in different ways. Even if all teams agreed on story points, a 13 point story in one team does not mean the same as a 13 point story in a different team. It's just a number. That's why one team might have a velocity of 50 and another of 205.7, even if both produce working software at the same speed. If all you need is capex vs opex, ...


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The typical answer would be to ask the team. Many of the methods built around agility favor self-organizing teams, where the teams would assess the knowledge and skills that they have and determine if they are missing something important or relevant for the team to be able to do their work. As far as methodologies that go that have a similar role, both DSDM ...


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Is it realistically possible? Yes, I’ve witnessed it happen on several occasions. The other answers make a good point about challenging factors: team work communication technology An effective Scrum Master will need those things and also will need to know how to ask the right questions to get the right information out of the team. It’s an information game....


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The real question is, can the team work remotely. Of all the roles, the Scrum Master is not more or less dependent on good communication than the other roles. At least not if they work as a team. Sure, you can lock a developer in a room somewhere and they'll produce code, but that's not what a team is. Teamwork only works with all the people in the same room....


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Without understanding fully, I don't think we can suggest the best approach. With that in mind, here is my approach based on the information given. 1) Remove the concept of 1 week development, 1 week testing. It should be test as soon as developed, fix bugs as soon as it is tested. This will ensure that your deliveries have as little amount of bugs as ...


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There are two major impacts of a remote Scrum Master in my experience. The first is that meetings like the retrospective and sprint planning are a real challenge. The biggest problems are usually with audio quality, particularly if using phone lines or teleconference hardware that mutes the end of the call that isn't talking. If you can get a top quality ...


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Since you are the product owner, you should think of the product in terms of users. Do users care about the database? No, right? Then you should not either. Your user stories should be rewritten from user's perspective, not technical team's perspective. See below. US1: as an admin I want to write a message on a new page dedicated for this matter. As an ...


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