4

TL;DR Projects exist within the context of an existing organizational structure, are managed through delegated authority, and should not be run like independent fiefdoms. All of your sub-questions boil down to an organizational failure to properly charter the project and define the project manager's scope of authority (if any). In addition to the process ...


4

TL;DR You've framed your question as an interpersonal issue, with the presumption that it has to do with your delegated authority within your organizational framework. This is an assumption, which we'll talk about shortly. Even if we accept the premise that this is an issue of your authority, it is not necessarily a personal or interpersonal issue. Since a ...


4

Maybe you need to adjust the way you ask for information. When you have no longer the time to do the fact-finding yourself, you have to delegate it. But you need to make sure you communicate this change clearly. Obviously people still think you can just grab data from the repository. Next time, make clear what you need: Hey Bob, can you please prepare a ...


3

TL;DR You probably don't want to hear this, but the developer is probably right about your lack of experience, although based on what you've said they are addressing it in a very unconstructive way. From your own description, you clearly lack effective authority, influence, and delineation of roles on your project, making this more a question of fitness for ...


3

This is not specific to this question but rather general advice for resolving these types of inter-personal issues: try to put yourself in their shoes first. what do they gain from the current behavior? what's their benefit in resisting the change you'd like to happen? (Retaining influence, protecting their work, ...) how can they benefit in similar/same/...


3

Short answer: communicate. Do what is called a retrospective. Long answer: The only way to resolve this situation without bad blood, is to talk about it in the whole team. Tell you teammate that you have concerns regarding his work. Explain your position and let him explain his. Then try to find a solution. Don't try to force anything on anyone. It's hard ...


3

Tobias's answer is a good one from the standpoint of a PM trying to establish authority over a matrixed organization, which by its very nature is weak. I do not agree, however, with his summary statement: In summary, the project manager can bind the team effectively only by personal power via loyalty, respect, and so on. I disagree with this ...


3

The answer to this question comes down to the "types of power" or "bases of power". You will find lots of references on the internet, e.g. on Wikipedia 1. Here are some base information: There is formal power, given by the company organisation, including: Coercive Reward Legitimate To answer your question, personal power is the relevant one: Expert: ...


2

tl;dr "Independence" isn't the issue; the issue is accountability and your integrity. Dispense with the distractions Independence is a road to project failure. You are interdependent; your success is tightly coupled with that of your project team, and theirs with yours. Any other viewpoint will lead you to disaster. I would argue that none of the ...


2

Refer to senior management only if it is a policy issue As @CodeGnome pointed out you should not try to run your project as an independent fiefdom. On the other hand, you should not refer every decision up the chain either. "In broad terms, delegating up means pushing responsibility and decision-making up one level, with the intent of the employee to ...


2

Read Belbin's Team Role Theory and French and Raven's Power Types. There are other theories, as well, so a bit of research will uncover a ton of academic conversations around your issue you are facing. The key take away is that high functioning teams gravitate its individuals to play certain, necessary roles that make it a high functioning team. It is ...


2

Interesting diversity of opinions here. If the employees are matrixed, then all assignments and priorities will come from the functional lead. People respond to the individuals who write their performance appraisal. In this situation, the project manager must accept the constraint that she or he does not determine the employee's priorities. Therefore the ...


1

Firstly you should clarify your actual responsibilities in the organization if those aren't already clear to everyone. Your line manager ought to be able to help with that. PM roles do vary from place to place so it's understandable that there may be differences of opinion about what a PM should be doing. If a person is disrespectful then try to resolve it ...


1

CLIENT ?!? This isn't rocket science... The client should have one major contact in your company through which all issues could be addressed. That contact would have authority over both project managers and that contact should decide how your company is going to support the client. You may for instance need a third project manager over the other two. You ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible