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Refactor instead @Marv Mills gave good advice on what not to do - complete rewriting. Here is what I suggest you can do - refactoring. You said you are already working on bug fixes. Whenever you touch any piece of code for fixing a bug, refactor only that part of the code. Also, you said you have to customize the app for the next client. Again whenever ...


5

If you reduce or remove a non value adding activity the overall outcome won't change, but the process time will be reduced. Often the non value adding activities take some time, but they can be caused by unnecessary transportation, doing things again etc. In Lean production they are called waste. A couple of examples: corrections: when you have to fix ...


4

The best way to make a case for a project is using a cost benefit analysis. Work out how much something will cost the company. Work out how much benefit (usually in financial terms) the company will receive, over what timescale, through doing the project. Wrap the costs and benefits into a proper business case that provides context and high-level analysis ...


4

Ignoring the substantive issue you're facing and focusing on the process of problem resolution, the general flow looks something like this: Clearly articulated problem statement: seems like you have that; Identification and analysis of potential root cause(s): seems like you have this, too; Analysis of Alternatives (various business model possibilities): ...


3

Functional Requirements Describes what the system should do or be capable of doing Typically if functional requirements are not met, then the system will not work (at least not in its entirety) The wireless infrastructure system shall provide wireless network coverage across the 3000 sqft warehouse. The wireless infrastructure system shall provide a ...


2

In my experience it's a horses for courses type of a situation . In case of some projects the Big Bang approach works brilliantly while in some other projects I would settle for the Phased Implementation approach . A number of factors have to be considered before deciding which approach serves best . A few of these factors are : Does the implementation ...


2

TL;DR I’ve been tasked with updating the business cases underlying several projects in a program that is significantly over-schedule and over-budget. This is corporate-speak for "the projects have failed." To address this properly, you may want to consider positioning the current program portfolio as a sunk cost so that the focus is not blame avoidance, ...


2

SWOT Establishes a Business Case, Not Comparative Value In general, (S)trengths and (W)eaknesses in a SWOT diagram are about the company itself, while (O)pportunities and (T)hreats are usually about the market. A project often presents an opportunity or mitigates a threat. Likewise, companies have strengths and weaknesses that can make a given project more ...


2

I would start with getting a clear overview of the constraints on the possible solutions. And with constraints I mean the limitations that are not within your (or the business owner's) power to change. For example, if the authorities put a limit on the number of people a restaurant is allowed to serve (e.g. no one inside, max 30 people outside), then ...


2

There is a bunch of techniques to prioritize your backlog. Scoring models (value vs effort, value vs complexity, RICE etc), KANO, MoSCoW, adoption of Delphi method (Buy a feature, Cost of delay), yadayadayada. The successful application of prioritization framework depends from your situation. If you have a dedicated person who can justify all business needs,...


2

I think you mean a Business Feasibility Plan.


2

"Assumptions" are a subtle concept. I would suggest that you consider all the factors that might affect your project's success if you can manage the factor (if it fits into one of the PMBOK processes), then manage the factor. Cost, schedule, quality, configuration, etc. Manage what you can. if you can't manage the factor treat it as a risk - ...


1

I would align the project with the strategic plan of the customer. In order for a project to be perceived as useful and valuable, the project has to deliver something that advances the strategic aims of the client. Right now I'm working with a project client who has defined their project in terms of ensuring resources are available for the organization, but ...


1

Benefits can also be objective and measurable, ie, SMART. I look at the difference between the two from a business case perspective is that the objective is your independent variable and benefit is the dependent variable. You perform the work to achieve the objectives and then those objectives will influence achieving the benefits at some time in the future.


1

How does your sponsor want value measured? Your question indicates that the driver for your project was to measure (and presumably reduce) call duration. That would seem to be the likely first metric. Aside: Based on years of cynical experience, I'd suggest that you also measure rework - the number of calls that need to be re-opened or reworked. My current ...


1

There are probably a number of assumptions that are fairly generic and apply to most projects, then there are other assumptions that relate specifically to your project. Generic assumptions will be things like the following, noting that this is not a comprehensive list: Resources will be made available when required (people / finances / materials / ...


1

warning - this is a poor answer This is a non-trivial question. I've spent many hours pondering this question and I've come to the conclusion that the question is not simple. Reasoning by example is a poor practice, but.... Security is traditionally a non-functional requirement. Security describes how the product behaves. Based on that principle the ...


1

One restaurant I know came up with a daily changing menu for a minimum price that they could deliver to the elderly within their area. Became very popular, and of course, they did not just focus on the elderly as a change from home cooking can be welcome to all. Not sure if they continue it as conditions due to cv19 have changed. But you have to look at ...


1

1. "But I am not able to identify the risk in above case study" Some potential risks: Not enough people are interested The wrong type of people join; not experienced/rich/influential enough People make promises and don't keep them, or sign up and don't turn up People join for the wrong reasons, e.g. to make a profit for their own business Projects cost way ...


1

An investment alternative or project alternative itself does not have strengths and weaknesses per se. What it produces as an outcome would have strengths and weaknesses. From an evaluation standpoint for selection, you would perform a benefit / cost / risk analysis, which is sort of way to predict its outcome SWOT, I suppose. I think in most cases, when ...


1

Alignment Maps could be used to link user stories to business cases: Alignment maps are organizational information radiators that help visualize the alignment of ongoing work with business outcomes. The work may be regular functionality addition or technical work such as re-architecting or repaying technical debt or improving the build and ...


1

As noted in the comments you are really looking for the approach and thought processes of your candidate. Essentially you are looking for quality analysis (you are hiring a business analyst) and strong clear communication skills to engage positively with other people and communicate accurately and clearly. So the three areas are Analytical Investigation. I ...


1

It isn't clear to me whether or not there is an issue. If you need the DB upgraded before other work can complete you have a net ~6 week overage in your schedule (~12 weeks remaining minus 10 weeks of work minus 8 weeks to upgrade the DB gives minus 6 weeks). If the DB upgrade can be done concurrently with and independent of the other work you have no issue ...


1

Use cases are a mechanism to describe how a user (technically anyoune outside the system) interact with the system you are making to achieve a certain goal. Use cases typically contain a sequence of steps, where each step describes a singular action by the user, an action taken by the system or a response from the system. A classical example of a use case is ...


1

TL;DR Most projects deliver features or value (however the organization defines value for itself), but projects are unlikely to generate profit directly. Generally speaking, profits can only be generated once a shippable product is released into a sales channel, and the revenue from the sold product exceeds its associated costs. Track Value Instead of ...


1

You need to understand the context behind the task you have been given. If the expectation is that the programme is to be killed off, and all you are doing is to provide justification for that, then whatever else you do may be a waste of time and effort. On the other hand, if the question is being asked as a genuine "should we or should we not continue?" ...


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