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Here's my TL:DR answer: No! The engineer shouldn't be working on something if the business value isn't already defined. It's the voice of the customer (product manager, product owner, business analyst) that should be defining the business value. Said business value should be agreed to by the business before asking engineering to size the work for ...


5

Leadership 101: Do not force the team to do something for the sake of doing something. On the surface, it seems to be a very nice idea, being poorly implemented. The straight answer for the question is no - it does NOT make sense to force engineers (coding-oriented people, who usually have collosal knowledge on programming but low communication skills) to ...


4

this is the job of the engineer working on the issue as they're the one most familiar with it. Technically, no. The engineer working on the issue is the one most familiar with the technical details of said issue. The one most familiar with the issue itself would be a Business Analyst (BA). Furthermore, engineers often have different priorities. I would not ...


4

Your biggest problem is a toxic work environment. As you note, we yell at the technical person telling him almost literally that he is "not smart" enough to understand what we are trying to do. If someone were to do that to me, I'd immediately demand an apology. If I didn't get one, it'd clearly be time to update my resume... or perhaps even go to HR ...


3

What you are looking for is a Visual Portfolio Map Here is a good article that describes what a Visual Portfolio Map is and why you need one: How to Manage Interdependencies in a Project Portfolio. But first, what are these interdependencies and why do they matter to us? They can take a number of forms including (but not limited to) ... ...


2

Does it make sense to ask engineers to put a Business Value Add section in each issue they work on? No, not really, but you may want to do it anyway. Ideally, the person who asked for the feature should be able to clearly state what value it provides. Engineers aren't necessarily the best people to say why a feature should be implemented. In fact, they'll ...


2

Here's the materials: A board where you can stick pins Index cards for stories String & pins Process: Break down your requirements to user stories (vertical slices through your tech stack that DELIVER VALUE TO YOUR USERS) and add these to your board. Find out which ones have dependencies outside your team/project. Use pins and string to draw a line to ...


1

Alignment Maps could be used to link user stories to business cases: Alignment maps are organizational information radiators that help visualize the alignment of ongoing work with business outcomes. The work may be regular functionality addition or technical work such as re-architecting or repaying technical debt or improving the build and ...


1

This would make sense if the engineers were deciding which issues to work on, rather than being told what to work on. If the engineers are deciding what to do, they should be able to concisely explain why. If someone else is telling them what to do, that's the person who is in the best position to explain the business value that caused them to assign that ...


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A common approach is to use Process Failure Modes and Effects Analysis in conjunction with a happy path process map. The purpose of P-FMEA is to identify potential ways each step in the process may fail, the impact of failure, and the ability to detect that failure has occurred. Once a P-FMEA analysis has been conducted for a process, then the list of ...


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