7

TL;DR [I think] the only way to truly understand the benefits [of agile] is to become a certified Scrum Master. Is this a good idea? No. Agile practices encompass a spectrum of practices and frameworks well beyond Scrum, so a Scrum Master certification won't necessarily impart agility in a broader sense. In addition, doing more of something you dislike ...


6

You can refer to the eligibility prescribed by PMI for PMP - if you’re Secondary degree/High school Diploma, Associate’s degree or global equivalent, PMI expects one to have project management experience of Minimum 5 Years/60 months unique non-overlapping professional project management experience during which at least 7500 hours are spent leading and ...


5

PMI publishes "PMI Today", which displays the number of Active certification holders. As of August 2015 there are 655,576 PMPs, and 28,826 CAPMs. Another up-and-coming certification is the Agile Certified practitioner PMI-ACP which has 8,870. The other 5 certification streams have less than 4k. All told a little under 700k. Keep in mind that some people ...


4

TL;DR I refuse to offer a personal opinion on the qualifications of individual instructors because we don't allow polling questions on PMSE. In addition, evaluating the cost/benefit of any particular class is out of scope for PMSE. However, the question about whether instructor qualifications matter for Scrum training seems valid and on-topic here. Define ...


4

No, there are no classes that you come away with a PMP certification. The PMP test is a proctored test under full observation conditions. You register for the test with a licensed test facility. You show up on the day of your test and sign in. You then put everything but your clothes into a locker. They will give you some loose paper and a writing implement....


3

Obtaining or holding a current PMP certification from the PMI does not require that the person is currently employed. However, to obtain the certification the applicant must provide evidence of three years of work experience in the knowledge domains tested. The full criteria for applying for the PMP can be found here on the PMI Website's Certification page. ...


3

Most people, when they learn a skill, start by learning the practices and simply performing them, until they understand a bit more about why those practices work. Martial arts has the concept of "shuhari". In the Agile domain I've heard these mapped to concepts like: shu: follow the master; perform the steps ha: understand, apply in context ri: adapt, add ...


3

There are only 2 requirements to appear for PMP exam- Project Management Experience 35 hours of Project Management Education Regarding Project Management Experience - You need 4500 hrs of experience if you have done 4 years of degree (bachelors degree or equivalent). Other wise if you have a diploma of equivalent then you need 7500 hrs of experience. The ...


3

Redirecting the Scope of Your Question [C]ould someone explain what is the main difference between those two certifications, and which one is more significant for IT Managers? Specific career advice is off-topic as it's too subjective. In addition, this site is specifically about the field of project management, not IT management in general, and ...


3

Short answer: The certification is valuable If your employer is paying for it, it may be a possibility that they compete or bid on work/contracts that require professionals with the ITIL certification. If this is the case, this could open doors for you in the future in technical leadership roles. Although you mentioned that you are not currently ...


3

There are lots of places that offer free PMP practice questions (eg http://www.oliverlehmann.com/sample-questions-pmp-self-tests.html). Practise exams are only really useful if you feel you're ready to sit the real exam - they'll show you whether you're ready or not. Get closer to the time when you can take the exam before using a paid practice exam. In the ...


3

Basically I'm into release management, driving the day to day activities of a software release from end-to-end. My primary role and responsibility includes coordinating with interfaces to set up test environments, coordinating test cases/users and production deployment/planning/risk assessment from the process perspective/ITIL. Looking at your current role, ...


3

I don't know the answer to your question but I can advise you how to find the answer. Look at the advertisements for the jobs to which you are applying and see what certificates they "prefer" or "require." As well, if you get rejected, ask why and if they report a missing certificate as the or one of the causes, there's your answer. Thoughts on PMP: ...


3

There are some levels of Six Sigma: Green belt - foundation level in Six sigma. I suppose you are taking first level of Six Sigma, so you are looking for Green belt certification. Black belt Master black belt For each belt, all most all the Six sigma institute will provide you the 5-6 days classroom training and one written exam for certification. In 5-6 ...


3

For the most part I don't feel like employers recognize one six sigma certification over another. Most people who work in Quality Standards get certified through their employer and those employers usually bring in an outside firm anyway. Half of those people aren't even sure who they got their certification through, they just say "through work". There is ...


3

As many PM training portals say, PMBOK® Guide Sixth Edition is going to be released in Q3'17 (Jun-Aug 2017), and PMP Exam update to PMBOK® Guide 6 will happen in Q1 of 2018. https://www.project-management-prepcast.com/free/pmp-exam/articles/853-pmbok-6-release-date-and-timeline


2

No. Becoming a CSM seems like a pretty expensive and time consuming way of trying to convince yourself that you like something that you clearly don't. CodeGnome is right that there are plenty of roles out there for PMs, Devs and others who would prefer to work in a non-agile environment. And there's nothing wrong with that. That said, it took me a while to ...


2

Becoming a certified Scrum Master helps you understand Scrum more , but it will not make you to believe it. Benefits from agile process is a believe rather than a scientific proof to me, as no control experiment for agile process has been conduct (or could be conduct). Also, there is some organisation working with ScrumBut as CodeGnome stated, which makes ...


2

PRINCE2 has basically the same general ideas and concepts in PMBOK. In my opinion PMBOK is: More detailed; explains more concepts and processes and in details. More versatile; and covers more concepts and ideas. Discusses almost every aspect of project management. Uses professional and advanced terminology uses charts and visualization extensively. More ...


2

In my opinion, PRINCE2 and PMP are competing. Both are based on different approaches and methodologies. PRINCE 2 is Process based – defines What, How , When , and who can do series of management processes. It dictates right process to follow whereas PMP is Knowledge based – Tools & Techniques and best practices that can be applied when managing projects....


2

The Professional Scrum Master (PSM) exam is not straight-forward at all. You can study all of the materials, have tons of hands-on scrum experience, and still not reach the 85% mark. Most of the questions are highly subjective and support is unresponsive. The forum is full of theoretical debates. If you aren't sure of the answer they're expecting, you won'...


2

If you are working as a project manager, then in my opinion, Scrum would be more appropriate than ITIL, as it relates directly to project management for a specific style of agile projects, but please don't forget that Scrum isn't the only way to run a project. You may also wish to consider Prince 2 or PMBOK to give you a wider perspective on project ...


2

I like CodeGnome's 1. Get certified, and 2. Get educated. This is key to every type of training and education, from formal universities and professional degrees to the trades to certificate programs, etc. We get educated because that is one of the necessary elements of growing our capability. The getting educated part is for you. We get degrees, ...


2

The PMP certification is specifically for project management. If you're a product manager, you probably want to pursue a certificate program related to program or portfolio management rather than project management. A non-exhaustive list of such programs include: Certified Scrum Product Owner (CSPO) Program Management Professional (PgMP) Portfolio ...


2

You're fine, as long as you have some proof that you attended that course. The time of education doesn't matter (even college courses about project management comply). The PMP handbook clearly states Record all education hours regardless of when they were accrued. Good luck


2

Set Certification Goals each Year Is your organization more focused towards work involving ITIL? E.g., does your company have contracts that have ITIL v3 certification requirements? If so, having an ITIL certification first may give you an advantage in this area. It is a good practice to have knowledge of these requirements and set goals each year to ...


2

This is a highly opinion based question, but here is my view on certificates. Nowadays, online presence, experience, and references trumps certificates in information technology. Recruiters and sorcerers look for candidates with good background. Same of the HR persons I know say that certificate can be bought - actually that's the point of one - therefore ...


2

The CSM Certification is a good start for just about anyone involved in Scrum/Agile -- its goal is to give everyone a solid foundation in the principles of the framework. I think that would probably get you the most ROI. That said, I'll give the caveat here that I always give with recommending Scrum certifications: the cert itself is fairly valueless. The ...


2

Scrum.org focuses more on delivery of software and the material reflects this. In the interests of fairness I should point out that I am a licenced PST, and that the Scrum Alliance also have similar courses in name. For the theory I would recommend the Scaled Professional Scrum (SPS) as it focuses not only on release, but release at scale. It covers many of ...


2

Okay switching this to an answer. As you mentioned PSM I and PSM II have the same subject matter and syllabus, and with the recent change to PSM II it does not have essay questions any longer. The difference in the questions is PSM I has fairly straightforward questions with textbook answers, ie if you read through the material you should be able to pick ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible