10

If a company is to be Agile, "the entire company" needs to be Agile. It's not something you just decide to do, or actually... decide on the development team to do. It's a change in mindset. For example, you can't keep things like traditional "Command and Control" attitudes in the company's top layers, while placing all the responsibility ...


7

I don't think this is specific to frequent releases (though it does exacerbate the problem I guess) as the main problem is "I used this system yesterday just fine and now I can't find the functionality". These probably should help: Invest in great UX. If the tool is intuitive and convenient people will understand how to use the changes without ...


4

PMBOK 6th Ed. Section 4.5.3.2 change requests may be issued to expand, adjust, or reduce project scope, product scope, or quality requirements and schedule or cost baselines. Change requests are processed for review and disposition through the Perform Integrated Change Control process. As the other answers have said, PMBOK does not say that change should be ...


4

Normally, if you reprioritize or reschedule tasks to be started immediately, you need to interrupt and postpone current activities. This inevitably incurs overhead. Your client needs to understand that changing plans isn't free. In a fixed contract, you will have calculated some buffer for unforeseeable changes, but this buffer isn't there to be used up by &...


4

It becomes a contract dispute. As the PM, you would escalate the dispute based on however your company defined its escalation process. Most likely, you would raise it internally through your contracts and legal departments. The folks there would assess the merits of your argument as compared to the contract language and the risk of litigation. From there,...


4

My question is therefore around how such users can be brought along on the journey without imposing delays on the development community, who are tasked with implementing technical change? A useful technique is to apply feature toggles. The developers are constantly releasing code to production, but the features are made visible at the pace the business ...


3

If your operating model involves detailed scope and change management then ultimately that comes down to negotiation. As in any negotiation, you can win some things and lose others. If you think you are giving away too much then the final decision is usually a matter of account management rather than project management because whoever makes the commercial ...


3

Based on this article, I would say it's a subset because when dealing with emergencies, only the most important steps are taken, in order to solve the problem ASAP. The idea is to solve the emergency as fast as possible. E.g. during ECAB not every possible factor is taken into consideration and we don't analyze all possibilities. Adding more people, as you ...


3

This is a really great question, although perhaps a bit too broad to be a good fit for PMSE. Firstly it must be said that the term agile is too often assumed to refer to the Agile Manifesto for Software Development. At least that's how most people on this site are likely to interpret the word. That's a shame because the Manifesto (dated 2001) embodies ideas ...


3

This depends on what you mean by "flexible with changes" and "resisting changes". The PMBoK assumes a process in which you define the work, do a breakdown of that work, then build a plan to perform the work. It's a predictive model in which you define scope, cost, and time at the beginning of the project. So obviously, once you have ...


3

The PMBOK doesn't discuss resisting change. It discusses scope creep and managing change. These two things are not the same. Scope creep is uncontrolled change, a change that occurs without official approval, impact analysis, and coordinated change of those impacts. Managing change is the opposite of that. As a PM, you disallow scope creep but you both ...


2

Simplistically, what your customer is telling is you is not illogical. If you bring tasks forward to complete, causing an increase in cost burn secondary to an additional resource, it follows logically that you should be able to reduce a resource in the second half of the project, thus netting out a breaking even. If you have two employees across the PoP, ...


2

This is why product owner for one team is a full time job. The product owner doesn't usually just work in isolation, a huge part of the product owner's job is getting feedback and buy-in from all the stakeholders. For a team with internal users, the sprint demo/review is a big help. For the example you give, where there are multiple offices and local experts ...


2

A change log is the place where you record changes to the project. This regards changes that weren't initially planned or included by the project's constraints of (mainly) cost, scope and time. The change log is something from traditional project management, which works by defining a project as a sequence of activities (stages or phases) that you can plan ...


2

It does not matter the type of contract. All projects need to have a way to process changes because changes are a near certainty for every project in existence and will always be. The process does not have to be complex for smaller, less complex projects but there needs to be a way to understand the change, estimate cost and schedule impacts, estimate ...


1

Inform and Advise Your Company's Leadership As others have said, this is largely a contractual issue. From a project management perspective, your responsibility ends at referring the issue to senior management and/or your contracting or legal departments. As for what happens next, there are generally five possible outcomes: The service provider and the ...


1

Software developers use the term refactoring to refer to technical changes that have no impact on functional or non-functional requirements. An example might be a decision to develop a component in the Go language instead of Java. Typically that kind of change wouldn't need a sponsor's approval unless it had an impact on some other commitment.


1

The answer to the first two questions can turn out to be simple or complex, but it is the same regardless of the size of project: negotiate. The evaluation as to whether something represents a change and then how much it costs often involves negotiation because not all eventualities can be be precisely defined in a contract. Even if it were possible to agree ...


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