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4

PMBOK 6th Ed. Section 4.5.3.2 change requests may be issued to expand, adjust, or reduce project scope, product scope, or quality requirements and schedule or cost baselines. Change requests are processed for review and disposition through the Perform Integrated Change Control process. As the other answers have said, PMBOK does not say that change should be ...


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This depends on what you mean by "flexible with changes" and "resisting changes". The PMBoK assumes a process in which you define the work, do a breakdown of that work, then build a plan to perform the work. It's a predictive model in which you define scope, cost, and time at the beginning of the project. So obviously, once you have ...


3

The PMBOK doesn't discuss resisting change. It discusses scope creep and managing change. These two things are not the same. Scope creep is uncontrolled change, a change that occurs without official approval, impact analysis, and coordinated change of those impacts. Managing change is the opposite of that. As a PM, you disallow scope creep but you both ...


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Simplistically, what your customer is telling is you is not illogical. If you bring tasks forward to complete, causing an increase in cost burn secondary to an additional resource, it follows logically that you should be able to reduce a resource in the second half of the project, thus netting out a breaking even. If you have two employees across the PoP, ...


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What kind of project? In software development projects it's very common to reprioritise frequently and to parallelize activities. Scheduling and critical path analysis is usually counter-productive when it comes to software projects. The client has a valid point that, depending on the nature of work and the approach being taken, changing priorities won't ...


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Normally, if you reprioritize or reschedule tasks to be started immediately, you need to interrupt and postpone current activities. This inevitably incurs overhead. Your client needs to understand that changing plans isn't free. In a fixed contract, you will have calculated some buffer for unforeseeable changes, but this buffer isn't there to be used up by &...


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The answer to the first two questions can turn out to be simple or complex, but it is the same regardless of the size of project: negotiate. The evaluation as to whether something represents a change and then how much it costs often involves negotiation because not all eventualities can be be precisely defined in a contract. Even if it were possible to agree ...


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It does not matter the type of contract. All projects need to have a way to process changes because changes are a near certainty for every project in existence and will always be. The process does not have to be complex for smaller, less complex projects but there needs to be a way to understand the change, estimate cost and schedule impacts, estimate ...


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