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Don't think of the iron triangle as a mathematical equation. The iron triangle is generally a cause & effect rule for project management. In projects, generally; The scope does not reduce. Customers always want more with less budget in a shorter time; this is called capitalism. If somehow it seems that you are going to spend less, customers tend to add ...


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What the others have said about it not being straightforward is correct. However, at least when considered as an abstraction, I'd argue that it does get pretty simple. You can't increase one constraint without decreasing at least one of the others. Where your given figure gets confusing is the (wide) arrows. An upward cost arrow there means the same as a ...


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Each of these variables is correlated with the others. If a change occurs on one of them, it will likely drive some degree of change in one or both of the remaining variables. There are several reasons that will cause variation in the degree of change the other variables will experience. Different tasks have different degrees of resource elasticity. And that ...


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As Hans-Martin says, the reality is rarely so simple, particularly in technology projects and other kinds of creative problem-solving work. There is often an optimal team size and so changing the timescale doesn't necessarily mean a corresponding change in cost or scope, it may just require resizing the team appropriately. On the other hand, the relationship ...


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The relationship between cost, time, and scope is a bit more complex. The main statement is that you cannot tweak one corner of the triangle without affecting at least one of the others, too, but the direction isn't always obvious. There's a factor which has been left out of these diagrams (team size), and if you assume that is constant, then you're right ...


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