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This is not specific to this question but rather general advice for resolving these types of inter-personal issues: try to put yourself in their shoes first. what do they gain from the current behavior? what's their benefit in resisting the change you'd like to happen? (Retaining influence, protecting their work, ...) how can they benefit in similar/same/...


3

Short answer: communicate. Do what is called a retrospective. Long answer: The only way to resolve this situation without bad blood, is to talk about it in the whole team. Tell you teammate that you have concerns regarding his work. Explain your position and let him explain his. Then try to find a solution. Don't try to force anything on anyone. It's hard ...


2

Read Belbin's Team Role Theory and French and Raven's Power Types. There are other theories, as well, so a bit of research will uncover a ton of academic conversations around your issue you are facing. The key take away is that high functioning teams gravitate its individuals to play certain, necessary roles that make it a high functioning team. It is ...


1

So, I'm wondering how we can start helping her without completely destroying her productivity. Your concern is that you want to improve long-term productivity without impacting short-term productivity. While I can understand that some activities can't stop, keep the end-goal in mind. At a macro-type level it may be in your organization's best interests to ...


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