10

I use MoSCoW prioritisation with clients (Must, Should, Could, Won't) and build developments around that. If the client would cancel the release if 'X' feature wasn't delivered, or if there is no workaround, then 'X' feature is a must. Therefore the MVP is then defined by the list of 'Musts' in the prioritisation.


6

Here are some pitfalls I've seen with the MoSCoW model. Managers are worried that their requirements will fall into "should" or "could", and won't get done, so they make up reasons why their requirement is a "must". This ends up delaying business-critical functionality. (This is usually caused by, or exacerbated by, bad KPIs at an organizational level. I'm ...


4

What you are discussing is a funnel for a customer feedback loop to iterate on your product. The good news is that lots of lean startup advice exists to help and guide you solve this problem. For an in-depth view of The Lean Startup and the measurements and metrics you should track to improve your product you can start with the Eric Reis book, Lean Startup ...


4

The answer to this is in your contract. How are you contracted with the customer? If time & materials, the customer pays. If cost plus fixed fee, the customer pays but you pay too in terms of your fee margin. If fixed fee, you pay. Not only do you need to understand the payment terms, but also assumptions and exclusions agreed to in the contract. ...


3

Role boundaries and swim lanes apply not only tasks and areas of decision making but also lines of accountability. And there's a difference between accountability and responsibility. In my view, the product owner is the sole owner of accountability to the end-user stakeholder. It is not shared, IMHO. The developers do own some responsibility to the ...


3

The greatest advantage is when you bring in a variety of stakeholders and talk through their different opinions on what needs to be done. Treat MoSCoW as a tool to help facilitate the discussion and document the consensus. This will help to get broad buy-in around what the product needs to be comprised of, hopefully avoiding rework downstream. Contrary to @...


2

I think if your goal is to measure customer satisfaction, then it is irrelevant what your product owner thinks. It would make no sense to ask the product owner about customer satisfaction, in case he is the one responsible to make the customer happy. Why? Because in case he does not talk about such things with his customer, he just has assumptions about it. ...


2

A definite advantage is it's simplicity, you shouldn't need prior knowledge or training to understand the concept. It uses human language to prioritise and define requirements rather than a specific scale, or measurement. Although the obvious counter argument is that it can be too simplistic, and doesn't provide enough information on what should be ...


2

The simplest way to determine the feature set of an MVP is by asking yourself of EVERY feature, "is this required in order to provide the minimum amount of value to the end user?". The whole concept of MVP is to get something out as quickly as possible to start validating your hypotheses by learning with real user data. Therefore you should only include the ...


2

In order to reduce waste and build an efficient MVP, you want to attack outcome they value the most. Something that important but they aren’t satisfied yet with current solution. This is how you filter down what matters and what is not before allocate more resources to actually build the thing. There is no point to solve / test something they already ...


2

I will assume what the "VIP" want fall somewhere between what you think and what the PO believes. I'll add some facts to that assumption: the VIP do not truly know what they want - not granulary anyway. Also, they will surely change the minds about some of the details? In Scrum and other iterative approaches, the feedback from Sprint Review will make it ...


2

I am not sure why you think you cannot escalate your client issue up the chain. Your company has a seat at the table and has every right to raise issues that affect your performance. You're not slaves. You're a party to a mutually beneficial contract. And as a PM, you have to have those uncomfortable conversations or else you are not really a PM.


1

Probably too late for your use, but this was a fun exercise. You asked: "Modern quality management requires customer satisfaction, prefers prevention to inspection and recognises management responsibility for quality. Explain, with examples, why each of these is important for quality management. What problems would you expect if these aspects of quality ...


1

I would try to use the instruments Scrum provides out of the box: Sprint Review and Sprint Retrospective. How Sprint Review can help: Since VIP People are the stakeholders of the software you develop, they should participate in Iteration Demo. Having those people on Demo you can ask them for the immediate feedback on whether the consider the delivered ...


1

As someone who has worked years on both sides of the counter, my experiences and two cents: From the vendor's view Avoid fixed-price contracts at any cost (sorry for the pun). But seriously, they can break your neck when your costs are galloping off and you can't make prices spiral up. Build and keep a small core of experienced developers. They can train ...


1

Very, very subjective. To sell anything to anyone you need to understand the context in which it will help them. What pain points are they having? Those are the things you want to target with your pitch. Much easier to sell water once you know the client is thirsty. Having said that, PMI have a good whitepaper that outlines some of the points you could ...


1

Review the terms of your contract, or have your Contracts Management group do so, if you have such a group. There is often language in a contract of this nature specifying the payment terms for any additional hours or overage expenses. Make sure the contract allows for you to request the customer pay a part of the additional expenses, before you request ...


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