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18

Really good question. Really hard to answer. Here is my two cents contribution. Agile showed up as a response to the practices of the late nineties for building software, practices that assumed you could define everything upfront in such detail and plan them out such that it was then just a matter of following that plan to reach a successful outcome. But ...


14

I'd like to be "fully" agile and having design being part of the sprint [...] I think there is a misunderstanding here, which is that in Agile there isn't any "upfront anything" and that the current iteration is the only place that things must happen. If this misunderstanding exists, people try to plan and do work only for the current ...


14

TL;DR Trying to "future proof" your data is done by making your tools, processes, and data structures flexible, not by fixing them for eternity. You do this by embracing test-first database design, ensuring your data is normalized and extensible, and that your tools and processes support change. You do not accomplish this by treating your data or ...


10

The agile approach does not necessarily imply shortsightedness. Depending on the problem domain, you may have a very complete understanding (in your example, the industry exists for quite some time, has best practices, etc.) or a very limited understanding (such as a novel idea for a social network). Very complete understanding It would be foolish to throw ...


8

How should a PM reconcile the wish to deliver something quickly, which may require extensive rework to add functionality in the future, versus doing extensive design up front then being able to develop all of the functionality quickly thereafter, with minimal rework? This is the question at the heart of agile. You could rephrase the question as: Is the ...


6

You already understand that UX/BA activities should be done before the Sprint starts, as developers need stories for planning. Your real question is how do you justify this approach from Scrum perspective (it's always the question with Scrum). I can see couple of ways of justifying it: UX/BA tasks are part of the sprint. But their job isn't to deliver a ...


4

I see two possible solutions: Consider the UX/UI designer as part of the SCRUM team. Whatever he/she does is a story, like all other stories. Now you have reduced the problem to the usual challenge of breaking down a task spanning more than one sprint, or more than one required participants, into pieces small enough not to have those issues. He will be ...


4

In Scrum, you have a Definition of Done. Equally important is your Definition of Ready — that is, what work is ready for sprint planning. Now, since a level of “Done” may be applied to each station in a workflow, it is reasonable to surmise that this includes the transitioning of work into the Sprint Backlog itself. In other words, before work can be ...


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