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5

You mention Definition of Done, and in Agile, the acceptance criteria and other user story content defines if work meets the user's needs, but often allows for shoddy workmanship. We all know we can cut corners to make things work in real-world environments. It's important to understand this has little, if anything, to do with the quality of the developer ...


4

When a task meets the acceptance criteria, that means it's done. No other options. In real life, if a developed task meets the acceptance criteria but needs some more attention or some updates that means task is not defined well. You may need to discuss this in retrospective meetings. Possible challenges are as follows: Product ownership is ambiguous....


4

For us, "it depends". We try to take into account of whether this is, for want of a better description, "scope creep" and how much extra time it adds to the task. We're using Scrum in 2 week iterations and if a request comes through that we think we can finish in this sprint without jeopardising our commitment we accept it. Sometimes we'll say "that makes ...


4

The first thing to address is the notion that estimates are used to "beat" the developers. This is simply bad management. Mike and others use this red herring many times as an excuse for not doing estimates. Estimating software development is an art, but also a straight forward process done all the time in complex embedded systems. Learning to produce ...


4

I wonder if the issue is not so much closing off a task as poor estimation of how much work remains. It is pretty common in my experience to have progress stall at 90-95% complete.... mainly because of poor estimation both of what work needs done and poor estimation of resource availability. A better practice for tracking progress is to define something as ...


3

A few thoughts on the question: In reality, I don't see the problem here. Frequent changes are absolutely normal for Agile. Even more, this is a part of Agile. You can't make part of product "at all". There is always a chance that there will be new requirements for this part. Second principle of agile is: Welcome changing requirements, even late in ...


3

By control limits, do you mean an acceptable tolerance for cost and schedule variances? If so, 10% is the typical benchmark, at least commonly accepted with those systems that are ANSI compliant, like in the DoD. In other words, your CAC is acceptable if within + or - 10% of your BAC. You can certainly tighten it up based on your project needs. To keep ...


2

Regular reporting of status within the team is a tool to track performance, and is probably the most commonly used. Unfortunately it isn't a mathy approach, which can cause some stakeholders undue angst. CodeGenome provided some links regarding Earned Schedule in his answer to a question of mine. Willl also provides links regarding control charts in his ...


2

This may not quite answer your question but one approach to your problem might be to look at the use of control charts, which concentrate less on whether a particular process is within its bounds (+/- 10% or whatever upper and lower bounds you select) and more on identifying patterns of change between those bounds. It's typical to use the seven run rule, ...


2

Earned Value Management Isn't a Quality Control Framework In the "Limitations" section for EVM, Wikipedia clearly states: EVM has no provision to measure project quality, so it is possible for EVM to indicate a project is under budget, ahead of schedule and scope fully executed, but still have unhappy clients and ultimately unsuccessful results. While ...


2

An important aspect of both BCWS and BCWP is that they are time-phased values. Their values will change based on the date values of a task's baseline start and the project status date. This aspect was not brought out explicitly in the MS explanation of BCWP. Part of the pseudocode formula for BCWP and BCWS is this: [status_date] - [baseline_start] = ["...


2

I'll speak from the Agile-Scrum perspective. First I need to break down your question into two different problem areas: 1) Definition of Done is an operating agreement on your team. Many teams do not task out their definition of done because it is redundant and not unique to any given user story. A definition of done defines the engineering practices and ...


2

Edit: More reading on Wikipedia has thrown up this sentence that is so important I'm putting it at the top. Again, it supports my first impression of using agile and EV: Because EVM requires quantification of a project plan, it is often perceived to be inapplicable to discovery-driven or Agile software development projects Original post follows: One of ...


2

At completion, your BCWP or EV will equal your BAC. So your CPI formula will be BAC / CAC (cost at completion). So, unless your CAC = your BAC, meaning you neither over- nor under-ran your budget, then your CPI will not be 1.00. Your SPI, however, will be 1.00, which is why is it a useless indicator after the project crosses around the 70% complete ...


1

Actual Cost (there is no "Real Cost" field in the english version of MS Project) is NOT the same as ACWP (Earned value "AC (CRTR)"). The difference is that "Actual Cost" is a single field and "ACWP" is a TIMEPHASED field (like all the earned value fields). This means that "ACWP" is calculated considering the project's "Status Date" (or the current date if "...


1

I won't provide you the answer but here is a clue: costs are cumulative when calculating earned value indices. This clue applies to both questions.


1

The two variables you say you don't know are required to calculate PV, or BCWS, the cumulative sum of which is your BAC. Without this value, you cannot arrive at your EV, or BCWP. The question becomes, why can't you arrive at your planning values? If you have your BAC, how did you arrive at that without knowing its parts?


1

If the vendor is measuring perfomance of 'The' project then its the same calc who ever does it. If the vendor has an internal project to rent out their employees on a per diem basis then you can see the value and costs would be completely different things. Value would be money paid for working on projects Cost would be employee salaries, sales, marketing, ...


1

I would map your physical % complete with the PV/BAC for any given period, and then when you complete a specific physical % of the work, you can claim the mapped PV/BAC as your earnings. This is a graph that shows the S-curves for PV/BAC, the top line; % work, the second top line; % complete, the third line; and physical %, the bottom line. The physical %...


1

My guess is that you didn't save a baseline before marking the tasks as 100% complete. Based on the definition of BCWP by Microsoft: How is BCWP Calculated? When a task is first created, the BCWP is 0.00. As soon as a baseline is saved and progress is reported for the task (as actual work, actual duration, or percentage of work complete), Microsoft ...


1

A research project is by definition innovative and, for this reason, uncertain. Especially at the beginning, researchers might have only a rough idea of the hypothesis that they want to validate. Novelty, complexity and uncertainty make the use of an Agile approach a good choice in the Research & Technology context. There is the possibility to use an ...


1

EVM is designed to signal schedule and budget variances and treats both early and late finishes as undesirable. That makes EVM a poor fit for research projects since tasks cannot be finished or started early without signaling a problem. In a project of known scope and with activities of well understood value, earned value management can be an effective ...


1

First as we all know that estimations are uncertain(Cone of Uncertainty). Second, detailed requirement may not available at the initial phase of project (It may be a artifact in plan itself and many new things or changes may arise while development). Having said that, Baseline plan is an interim plan with initial estimate of project factors to track the ...


1

Sorry for the delay - I usually only follow questions tagged with MS Project. Do you have access to actual work values and baseline work? A suggestion is to assign all resources at $1 per hour. Using those values, you can still get somewhat meaningful EV measures as 1 hour work = $1. (or whatever currency).


1

I think you are confusing two separate things here: Baseline and Scheduling. I think a Baseline is a snapshot of a project plan at a specific point in time against which you can compare future plans to assess deviation from the plan. This holds true whether you front-load your project scheduling, back-load it, or something in between. You appear to be ...


1

I think this is an important issue; when project managers actively measure time and cost, but not quality, it is easy to guess which one suffers. The fact the project managers themselves are measured on time and cost more closely the quality does not help either, particularly where organisational culture strongly focuses on short-term efficiency at the ...


1

No, at least not directly. Earned value is strictly a cost control tool and, to a slightly lesser degree, a schedule control tool. However, what EV provides are early clues of an accruing variance and, with analysis, markers that allow you to predict with a good degree of confidence where you are headed. The result of those markers is the action to find ...


1

It's pretty easy but you have to do it in a weird way. Go to Reports - Visual Reports Select New Template, Excel, Assignment Usage, and click OK. Your report is now being created in Excel. Switch over to Excel. Add Time Weekly Calendar to the Row Labels section. Check Cumulative Work, Actual Work and Baseline Work. Move Values to the Column Labels box. ...


1

I don't believe it does. MS Project is seriously limited in its functionality. On our EVMS solution, we only load our schedule in project; our dollars are loaded into another tool and even a third tool is used to draw the graphs, called Winsight.


1

This is an X:Y problem. You don't have new tasks, you've got problems in scope planning and estimation/WBS development. 1) The work isn't scoped correctly - the WBS & WBSD should explicitly address the number of legs for the cat (assuming that the cat's number of legs is important). This is a planning problem. When you analyze variance, you should ...


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