12

My answer is: there are no predefined artifacts in Kanban. Scrum has predefined roles, events, and artifacts but Kanban doesn't. Kanban just describes 4 principles and 5 practices: Start with existing process; Agree to pursue incremental, evolutionary change; Respect the current process, roles, responsibilities and titles; Encourage acts of leadership at ...


11

Lean is to Kanban as agile is to Scrum. One is a concrete implementation of the other. Using the term "lean kanban" is just an attempt to court favour from Google/Bing for keyword density and is the result of copywriters rather than an actual thing. All Kanban is Lean... But not all Lean is Kanban...


10

It would not help you with multiple stakeholders. Scrum is already meant to deal with multiple stakeholders (and a single Product Owner consolidating their needs into a single prioritized product backlog). Scrum at scale is meant to help you with projects so large that you need multiple teams. If you want to know how to better cope with your stakeholders, ...


8

TL;DR Scrum@Scale is a specific framework developed by Jeff Sutherland and Scrum, Inc. for scaling Scrum beyond a single team. More generally, scaled Scrum (or "Scrum at [enterprise] scale") refers to the frameworks and practices required to apply Scrum concepts across multiple teams, which is often a requirement on very large or complex enterprise projects ...


8

The earliest reference that I could find were that the terms 'story card' and 'user story' were used when Alistair Cockburn visited the Chrysler C3 project. Kent Beck and Ron Jeffries were responsible for this project, and this is an early instantiation of what would become Extreme Programming (XP). Many people pair Scrum with the Extreme Programming ...


6

Just do it? doing is the best example. Set an iteration cycle period, lets say a week Create a backlog together with the family Do a planning sessions Estimate the work Make a realistic Sprint plan Daily monitor progress Visualize it on a board, todo, in progress, done At the end of the week review the victories Evaluate whats going well and where your ...


6

TL;DR Yes, the official Scrum framework requires a Definition of Done. You cannot claim to be using the official Scrum framework without defining and using one. Framework Sources The Scrum Guide is the definition resource describing the formal framework. While Scrum is quite flexible, elements such as the Definition of Done are not optional. The guide's ...


5

I've done this a couple times, tho it wasn't always a webapp & wasn't for scaling reasons. Here's what we did: Treat it like a new app. In our case, we renamed the app when we did that. Put it in its own repo. Freeze development on the old one except for critical bugfixes, so all resources can be devoted to the migration. Pare the feature set if ...


5

Kanban is a lean methodology focused on creating continuous flow of work while eliminating waste (muda) in the system. There is no difference between Kanban and Lean Kanban. Where there are some differences however... Kanban for software development differs slightly from the classic Lean Kanban formulated by Toyota in the 1980's and used in manufacturing ...


4

I don't think there's a "right" answer to this. Vicki's answer is perfectly valid. I'm going to give another answer that I think is also right. Start with making a list of the biggest problems your application has now. Maybe that is database redundancy, load time, architectural fragility, test coverage, whatever. Now sort that list into an improvement ...


4

In order to accomplish Scrum, the following conditions must be met: There must be buy-in from upper management (based on your question, you already have this) There must be buy-in from the Team There must be a Scrummaster who understands Scrum and is empowered to be its evangelist There must be a Product Owner who is authorized and empowered to make ...


3

Instead of repeating what other contributed so far (and I agree with the notion of anything generated during the implementation/application of Kanban is an artifact by CodeGenome), I would like to highlight the concept of Theory of Constraints, which transcends the common usage of Kanban from visualizing flow to exploitation of bottleneck, leading to ...


3

Scrum Artifacts: Burn-Down Charts Aren't Mandated Before answering your question, it's worth noting that burn-down charts are not required artifacts within Scrum. While the use of such charts is quite common, the framework itself does not require them. They are therefore ancillary artifacts generated by particular implementations, rather than artifacts ...


3

I've been using Kanban for Family chores for about a year now. Scrum had too much overhead for simple chores and none of the chores required a any degree of planning or collaboration, so Kanban seemed the best choice. My kids are 9 & 11 and they really took to it at first, because of the novelty. Then it all fell apart when they realized the "story ...


3

Redirecting the Scope of Your Question [C]ould someone explain what is the main difference between those two certifications, and which one is more significant for IT Managers? Specific career advice is off-topic as it's too subjective. In addition, this site is specifically about the field of project management, not IT management in general, and ...


2

If you are working as a project manager, then in my opinion, Scrum would be more appropriate than ITIL, as it relates directly to project management for a specific style of agile projects, but please don't forget that Scrum isn't the only way to run a project. You may also wish to consider Prince 2 or PMBOK to give you a wider perspective on project ...


2

Can I ask if anyone has been in a company who has replaced over 5 million lines of cobol with Java and how was the project managed. I worked for an organization that looked at replacing legacy systems several years ago. The decision was taken to "start again". The primary driver was to address shortcomings in systems that were developed in the 1970s and ...


2

Set Certification Goals each Year Is your organization more focused towards work involving ITIL? E.g., does your company have contracts that have ITIL v3 certification requirements? If so, having an ITIL certification first may give you an advantage in this area. It is a good practice to have knowledge of these requirements and set goals each year to ...


2

A broadcast versus a targeted event. If I recall correctly, a signal event is a broadcast message.


1

Key aspects of a task list I am seeking recommendations on how to manage an individual (my own) task list or how best to create a work management plan. Identify urgent vs important tasks: Urgent tasks tend to crowd important tasks to the background. Deadline: When do the stakeholders say they need it. Delivery commitment: When are you able to deliver ...


1

Starting with the basics: We all know that relative estimation is more accurate than absolute estimation. We all know that effort based estimation is gamed! It creates multiple ill-effects of comparison of between teams, comparison between team members, etc. No matter how much one tries to keep managements from doing this, this comparison is inevitable. As ...


1

Non-Software Scrum Exists, But... Scrum can be used for projects (as opposed to ongoing activities) outside of software development. However, in my experience adapting Scrum to administrative or other non-software projects requires a great deal more maturity and adaptability than your organization probably has if your current Scrum implementation is only "...


1

I know nothing from transportation vertical industry, but regarding something industry independent and applicable for HW, SW, and embedded systems, the V-Model could be something to start with: http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/V-Model. Here is a link to the complete description in English: ftp://ftp.heise.de/pub/ix/ix_listings/projektmanagement/vmodell/V-...


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