138

Please be careful when using these kind of measurements as KPIs. If you do this, I predict the following: arguments about whether bugs are caused by development or by poor quality analysis arguments about which developers caused which bugs defensive programming, which will increase the maintenance costs developers slowing down (no code means no bugs!) a ...


44

He is communicating a message to you that has nothing to do with the self appraisal or what he thinks of himself. You asked him to fill out a form, and he returned it to you with three small, inconsequential items and blanks everywhere else. Mark hit it: he's not happy about something and he is letting you know. It could be as simple as he is not happy in ...


27

I think you're also missing a few KPIs... Negative points every time a Product Owner changes a requirement. They should have know what they wanted before development started. Negative points every time a tester puts in duplicate points. Perhaps they get positive points ever time they find a bug? Negative points to HR every time a "good" developer leaves ...


26

This is a bad idea on so many levels. Lets list the ways: Builds blame culture: everyone will be trying to blame everyone else for bugs that are found because it will affect their review Encourages people not to take responsibility. If you do accept responsibility (it's my bug) then you get penalised Hurts inter-team relations. Developers and testers ...


21

Performance reviews based on bugs is a pretty bad idea imho. Even in best case scenarios where testers are assumed to be doing perfect work, it's very hard to implement some sort of bug tracker that doesn't produce side effects. What you might consider is using some sort of metric for re-work hours. That tends to work better because: You aren't telling ...


20

It sounds like you think he did a pretty good job this year regardless of what he said in his self evaluation, so you need to tell him that. Regardless of what he has written, if you believe he has achieved things this year worthy of mention you need to mention them! It may be that he just could not really be bothered to spend the time looking back over an ...


13

Misusing a Metric No one else has really covered this, so I'm going to point out that this appears to be a misuse of a management metric. Specifically: He did a semi-good job this year, completing a number of complex tasks and people seem to get along really well with him and he is always willing to help. That's the summary of the actual management ...


13

There are consequences to his behavior. For one thing, (assuming he as an at-will employee and your live in an at-will area) there is nothing stopping your company from cutting string with this person immediately. From the sound of things, he is in sabotage mode so it would be in your company's best interest to mitigate that and send him on his way. That ...


11

I am planning to give 40 points (my scoring system) to a developer, if he creates bug free code. How about asking the programmers how much (money) they will fork out if somebody could show them how to create bug free code? Professional coding is no easy task and there are much better ways of judging good programmers. Here is some reasons one ends up with ...


9

As an introverted individual, I feel the need to punish myself when I make a mistake. Some of my introverted friends have confessed to the same compulsion when they've let themselves (or others) down. Sometimes, the way we punish overselves can be very damaging. In the case that you describe, I could see myself behaving in a manner similar to your ...


9

One thing needs to be clarified here; the PM's role is NOT to develop any code. One role is the programmer, developer, etc... so I would hire people with technical skills required to do that role, and another different role is the Project Manager's. For this role, I would hire the person with the strongest capabilities to lead the project (if he or she has ...


9

Setting a target like number of bugs is something easy to trick, and it is easy to find somebody who the others can blame. This will kill your team cohesion. Please don't measure people by the bugs they introduced. If you do so, they won't commit anything until they are 100% that it is bug free, and you'll never have a release. While I wrote this answer I ...


8

What if you gave each 'candidate' a smaller project to manage as a 'test drive'? As they gain experience it is easier to assess how good they are at the job. Or take an even more radical approach: Why not try taking turns on being project manager within the team? That way all team members start acquiring skills and you are never short of a person who can ...


8

I am a fresh project manager, who grew up from developer. I noticed in my company, that knowledge of technical issues really helps me manage complex technical projects. It allows me to better understand developers , and when dealing with a client I can understand a lot more technical and business issues. I noticed that pm's in my company, who don't have ...


8

The criteria you will use for assessment depend on what you, as a boss, value, on what's for you, as a boss, important. You may create a long list of them (communication, honesty, humor, transparency...) , but people will get confused, so I'd limit to few, like 5 or 7, choosing the most important for you. In my opinion more important than a list itself, ...


8

Summary Does it make sense to hire a product owner from outside the company? If I do what skills should they have? Maybe. A better question is whether someone from inside the company or outside the company will have a better vision for a given product. I've personally been successful as an outside Product Owner, and have seen inside Product Owners both ...


7

I'd hire the person who is smart and can demonstrate that they can get things done. If he happens to have the IT background, wonderful.


7

The objections all of the contributors are on target and these are true with all KPIs. You establish a metric to increased desired behavior, that desired behavior is "paid for" by the removal of other behaviors, some of which are also desired. This is why establishing your KPIs is very challenging and you need to do so with care. A balanced approach is ...


7

TL;DR The loss or malfeasance of key personnel is always a project risk. You can often mitigate such risks through technical or administrative controls, separation of duties, and cross-training, but the risk level will never be zero. Once a risk is actualized, preventative controls are rarely practical. Instead, you will need to trigger (or create) ...


6

Sounds like they are not happy with their current position. Have management (whoever moved him under your supervision) tell him that even though he is now under your supervision that he is still very valuable. You should communicate to management that he is valuable. Find out his longer term goals and see if you can arrange a roadmap for him with ...


6

Before he was your employee he failed at being a supervisor. It is possible that this negative view started in his previous position. He may be asking "what role do I have in the organization?" If you value his input to the rest of the team, you might look at formalizing that mentoring so that it can be seen as a goal. I do assume that his goals were ...


6

Perhaps he is unaware of his worth and contributions or thinks that they are not-worth mentioning. Or maybe he is judging himself negatively due to reasons he could not control. Try letting your employees know when they are doing a good job instead of waiting for reviews. Maybe something was in his way in the failed project. Let him know that he should ...


6

Who set goals with this employee for the year? How many projects he was assigned to and did not complete were due to a change in management focus? Do you meet with him weekly to keep up on how things are going with him, and to update progress on goals? How many of his assignments are given to him because he's the one who has always done that kind of work? ...


6

PMs don't need to be very familiar with the IT environment to be successful. It helps but its not critical since most of the work he will be doing won't be of a technical nature anyway. IMHO, You have more problems with those clueless ones that THINK they know IT. The key thing about dealing with non technical PMs is to have a strong technical team leader ...


6

To be honest, I believe you shouldn't. In my opinion there is no fair way to measure this. No programmer, no matter how experienced he is, will create bug free code. Sometimes bugs are obscured by other bugs. Sometimes bugs evolve from interaction of two separate pieces of code that on their own are free of bugs. Maybe really severe bugs will stay ...


6

Quality is a process and not a simple measure of "defect" rates. You improve quality by creating a better process, from start to finish, stretching across all levels of the organizations. Penalizing one role in the value chain will not help you accomplish your goal.


6

I once worked in that kind of environment and guess what? I left this place with rage and in very bad terms. And that is what you're going to suffer from if you indeed try to measure your developer's proficiency based on their bugs. You're doing it all wrong. Here's how we fixed it back in the days: Make a complex yet short printed list of the most ...


6

EI and conflict management goes hand in hand. EI will be useful in all areas - Negotiations with client during inconvenient situations Motivation to resources who may not be happy with their role/responsibilities or senior management Conflict between team members Your team member may not be happy with you as well, you dont have to take it personally and ...


6

TL;DR: Probably not, unless they bring some key expertise you did not already have in your company. It depends, most product owners I have seen on teams are what I would call a proxy product owner. Translating business needs into stories and helping stakeholder prioritise between them. Shielding the team while understanding what technical debt means, and ...


6

TL;DR Your job as a Product Owner (PO) or Project Manager (PM) is not to have all the answers. Your job is to have a vision, and to communicate options to stakeholders and business decision-makers. Analysis and Solutions What if somebody is asking a salary increase? if I keep him, I have higher costs. Hence probably my budget will blow up. I can try to ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible