13

There are consequences to his behavior. For one thing, (assuming he as an at-will employee and your live in an at-will area) there is nothing stopping your company from cutting string with this person immediately. From the sound of things, he is in sabotage mode so it would be in your company's best interest to mitigate that and send him on his way. That ...


9

I have seen highly effective teams full of junior developers and disastrous teams full of senior developers. Rather than focusing on seniority and experience, I recommend: Hiring highly collaborative people Looking for a good mix of personality types (starters, completer-finishers, etc.) Hiring people with good leadership skills - willing to step up and ...


7

TL;DR The loss or malfeasance of key personnel is always a project risk. You can often mitigate such risks through technical or administrative controls, separation of duties, and cross-training, but the risk level will never be zero. Once a risk is actualized, preventative controls are rarely practical. Instead, you will need to trigger (or create) ...


2

Maybe I am wrong, but from your message I can see two main problems: No common way of working (their way and what you have in mind) You have resources but you don't have a team I was confronted to the same situation last year: new team, different profiles, different ways of work. It took me 6 months to get full speed as a team. Keep something in mind: you ...


2

Project Management Fundamentals Managing a project involves considering its constraints, namely scope, resources, schedule, budget and risk. So, part of managing the project requires managing people when they are resources allocated to that specific project. Human Resources (HR) Management Activity resource requirements is a primary input used to ...


2

You ask: Is there anything I can do to get him to do his job and provide the handover? One approach would be to ask him for a personal favor - either you or somebody he's somewhat friendly with. (This echos back to something I've written about multiple times. A Project Manager should be getting along with everybody. Just because he has always been ...


1

Let me qualify my answer a little bit with this: I do not know if there are any theoretical constructs with Scrum that dictates team make-up so I am answering in a more general way around teams. I like a lot the bullets that @Barnaby Golden (+1) provided in his answer; however, they are hard to identify during selection process and those things sort of ...


1

The only possible leverage you have is if HR asks him to leave immediately for refusing to co-operate in the handover and he loses his few weeks of pay - assuming HR and Legal say this is kosher to do. However, if he is not really bothered and just wants to leave early (probably due to having another role already lined up), he could even be trying this ...


1

Interesting question! And some interesting answers already. Just to add another option (which goes in the direction of "ask him for a personal favor"): Assign the task to continue development of his code to someone else (let's call him/her "developer B") of your team and define some new features/bugfixes/changes to be implemented by developer B. Now ...


1

Please excuse the condescending tone, but you did ask for my approach. So here it is, in the raw: Firstly, you need to change your attitude. As a successful project manager, you do get along with your team. A PjM who cannot get along with everybody is doomed to failure. If you can't do that - or at least fake it - then get yourself another job. Secondly, ...


1

I've just found a good list of 1-on-1 questions. 1on1 questions list


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