14

TL;DR Scope creep is a project risk, and must be controlled. However, in agile frameworks, scope is a variable constraint rather than a fixed one. To be an effective agilist, one needs to understand the differences between scope and change control, and how to properly apply a given agile framework to embrace change (which is a core value) without putting ...


14

I'll answer as if I was a project manager actually in that situation. I'm also going to assume you're looking at a normal sized project team (4-8 people) rather than a programme of work spanning multiple teams (and perhaps 50+ devs). Being in a situation where you have 500 bugs to fix in two weeks is a sign of a project in failure mode. There's no easy way ...


10

For most teams it's because they don't know any better. Many Scrum implementations start with someone reading the Scrum Guide and begin to follow what's written in there. Mechanistically. It's a process to follow, it's a list of checkboxes to tick. So they follow the process and they tick the boxes thinking they are actually doing Scrum. Often, the ...


6

Other answers have provided good detail on the 'hard' skills (budget management etc) that good PMs should be able to demonstrate but I'd be most interested in the soft skills - negotiation, persuasion, communication etc - that are sometimes overlooked but are (in my experience) most critical to success. What you ask and how you ask it should be guided ...


6

My answer would be that, if I had to come up with a speech and find ways to motivate them with only two weeks remaining to recover from this type of an issue, I am already too late and have already failed. Building a high performing team starts at day one. Motivation for success is a symptom of a high performing team. If a high performing team was faced ...


5

This is a great interview question, because it tells you a lot about the company asking it. In particular, it tells you you don't want to work there, which means you can answer, "Thanks, but no thanks," skip the rest of the interview, and go get some ice cream.


5

Product Management Sets the Vision Product management, and specifically the Product Owner role in frameworks like Scrum, are primarily about managing the vision for a product. The day-to-day work of product management involves a lot of things such as: stakeholder management market and business analysis product positioning prioritization of features and ...


4

What constitutes a good PM is highly subjective but I'm going to take a stab at this based upon what I would look for in a good project manager to see if that helps you. Overall: Leadership skills / attributes: I would look for someone who is a leader. Michael Hyatt did a recent podcast on this which is a good reference: http://michaelhyatt.com/episode-12-...


4

The first team I was in that practiced Scrum did almost every practice wrong. It was also the most enjoyable team I've ever worked on and one of the most agile. I'd be far less worried about if they practice Scrum properly and more concerned about their overall approach to software development. I'd ask questions like: How frequently does the team sit down ...


4

I usually answer by telling that the requirements need to be clearly defined before the project starts, and if there is any change during the project then it has to go through a change control process which involves the change control board, etc etc Your interviewers are right — this isn't agile. The point of agile is that requirements change. Your ...


4

There could be several reasons, but I'd posit the most likely would be: It's a trap. Scrum is attractive to job-seekers, so they claim they're doing it to get more/better applications. The right hand doesn't know what the left hand is doing. The HR people take a glance at the development people, see a few 'Scrum-like' things, and, not truly understanding,...


3

tldr; Agile shifts the focus to the discovering and creating a solution for the customer's needs. Agile values "Responding to change over following a plan" because one must "Welcome changing requirements" in order to "harness change for the customer's competitive advantage" It can help to begin with an understanding of the classic Iron Triangle model, aka ...


3

With a fixed deadline you have two elements of the development iron triangle left to play with: scope and resources. A typical agile approach would be to (at least initially) fix the resources and start iterating. The idea would be to deliver as much value as possible against the list of requirements. The customer might not get everything they want, but ...


3

If CodeGnome's comment were a post I'd +1. Focus on how you are going to understand the customer needs, not the technical solution. Three point/suggestions: Watch Simon Sinek's "Start with Why" TED Talk: This is the mindset a good Product Owner should always be in. You need to understand the "why" of your company to be able to deliver value to your ...


3

Hunter & Hunter 1984 and others have described consistently how incredibly weak our employee selection tools and processes are. Conducting an interview is one of the weakest selection tools in terms of predictive validity, although adding structure helps to a decent degree. If all you have in your employee selection tool box are resume reviews and ...


3

Q - How do you make MS Project information available and understandable for non PM team members? A - Typically this will involve views printed to PDF, exports to Excel, sometimes people have experienced Project Server and the answer will involve web based reports. Q - How does MS Project determine a task is on the critical path? A - If total slack is <...


3

First thing: in the past I've found interviews more useful than resumes. Old studies from IBM showed a factor 25 productivity difference between developers on the same project (uhh, yeah, that is 25...) The last 15 years I've been on the interview side and within the organisation I've worked for we have always used an interview combined with short ...


3

My answer would be: I facilitate technical answers. I trust the team to provide technical answers; I make sure that there is nothing that stands in the way of their understanding the problem and providing the answer. Sometimes that means making sure that the boundaries of the problem are clear (scope management). Frequently it is my job to facilitate ...


3

TL;DR You can look at data and use inductive reasoning to formulate a hypothesis, or use deductive reasoning to define your product goals. Note that you must have a hypothesis or goal to test and measure; otherwise, you're performing the equivalent of asking random sea turtles which shoes to make for the world's fastest Olympic runner. Even then, you're ...


2

I've been on both sides of the desk, and find the interview process not terribly helpful. I've yet to be through an interview that tested much of my skill set, not that I would appreciate one that did. When interviewing, I try to ask questions that give me a quick understanding of the candidate's skill level. I consider the interview a chance to see if a ...


2

Interviews are very low in validity. There is some improvement with increasing structure but you need to understand that results are marginal at best. Your odds at a good hire are not much better than a coin toss. Creating structure is easy. Standard questions, behavioral and scenario interviews, group interviews, easy research to uncover some ideas. ...


2

Coding Exercises: You'll hear 'coding exercises' a lot as the answer to this question. And while these exercises certainly have some value (they certainly test a person's desire for the position as they have to do up to 20 hours of unpaid work!) you should use them carefully. One problem is that, more often than not, these exercises are not related to ...


2

First and foremost thing is to prioritize the task, set the time frame for every task, distribute the tasks among the team members. And last but not the least, motivate team members to work hard.


2

Morning Joel, Having a standard list of questions can be beneficial in some cases. For instance, when I am interviewing potential new team members I have a list of 3 questions that I always ask to ensure I am asking the right questions to avoid not knowing how I feel about the candidate when they walk out. With that being said, here are some questions I ...


2

TL;DR In general, a Product Owner should focus on process, not on technical solutions. Your role on a Scrum Team is to represent the stakeholders or users, and to drive the development of the product, rather than to manage implementation details. The Product Backlog it a set of high-level deliverables, not a set of specification documents. Don't get caught ...


2

Assuming you're currently not working with Scrum (or other agile frameworks) at the moment, why would you care about ScrumButs? I mean, different companies will have different "maturity levels" on Scrum (some with more buts, some with less). Scrum is a tool with a purpose, not purpose in itself. If you join a company that's not yet mature enough (or with ...


2

I know companies like Microsoft, Google and Apple who do this assessments. Other companies I've worked for also do it. Don't think of it as "I'm going to be coding" but rather... "I'll be managing coding projects hence I need to understand them". I personally think it's useful to have technical knowledge for two reasons: It helps you understand deadlines,...


2

The PMBOK-Guide knows five types of estimates. One of them is the Rough Order of Magnitude (ROM). It has a range of -50% to +50%. As it is literally the roughest estimate, I guess your colleagues are referring to it as the minimum criteria. And just in case you are curious, the other four types are: Preliminary Estimate: -15% to + 50% Budget Estimate: -10% ...


2

TL;DR The question itself is unanswerable from a Q&A perspective because there's no canonical answer. We don't know what the interviewer wants to hear, and we can't guess at "correct" business decisions that really boil down to contractual issues between the company and their client. That said, the question you posed is likely an X/Y problem. The ...


2

Without seeing a job description I'll just have to make the assumptions that: as a technical manager your job will actually be about managing, and not writing code in that particular language. if you are applying for a technical manager position you know a lot of tech stuff, which don't resume themselves to just knowing a programming language, but knowing ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible