8

This can be challenging, it is always possible that someone tests well but can't perform in the "real world". In the past when I've interviewed candidates I've prioritized as follows: Personality. You can always train a new hire to become technically competent. You can't ever train them to be a decent human being if they aren't one already. Under this ...


5

Firstly, the interview as a predictor of future performance has a very low validity. Even structured, it is not helpful or very useful. Testing for cognitive ability and conducting "job tests" are two of the leading indicators of performance, with a validity approaching or around r0.5 (Hunter & Hunter 1984). So creating assignments or test questions ...


4

I would add an additional option: allow your scrum teams to select whatever they want off the backlog. You have given the scrum teams a prioritised overall backlog and they know what they are capable of delivering. If you allow the teams the complete freedom to take whatever stories they want to into their sprints then the overall process should deliver ...


4

Building on Marcin's response. The Guerilla guide to interviewing (latest version is best!) is very useful. It helped me a lot when I first had to evaluate technical staff for hiring few years ago during an expansion spurt (I was hiring electronics development and embedded programming, not just general purpose coders for enterprise software) I'm not 100%...


3

The most effective interview technique I have found for interviewing programmers is a white board session where we work through a real life case study followed by a programming test. The white board session gives a good idea of how well the candidate can articulate and share both their understanding of the problem and how they would approach solving it. ...


3

Simple answer: If your client asks you to do something, you're not a consultant. If they ask you what they should do, you're a consultant.


3

You can always call yourself consultant, because the definition of a consultant is not that strict: A person who provides expert advice professionally. You are person (check), you are an expert, therefore you can give expert advices (check), and you'll plan to earn your living from doing it - you are a professional - (check). Due to the nature of the job - ...


2

The time during the interview is too small in order to learn about the coding skills of a developer, however it is important to know more about his personality, so have a face-to-face discussion. When I get the CV of a new candidate I immediately start checking for code from her or him on github in order to see how he or she does the coding. If I don't find ...


2

When this happened - over 2 decades ago - at a company I worked for, I was given the title of Morale Officer! (Besides for my regular job.) I was given a small budget and was charged with ensuring the company was a fun place to be in. E.g.: I spent money on ping-pong balls for the ping-pong table, and made sure it was in use, often. Nosh is always ...


2

Coding Exercises: You'll hear 'coding exercises' a lot as the answer to this question. And while these exercises certainly have some value (they certainly test a person's desire for the position as they have to do up to 20 hours of unpaid work!) you should use them carefully. One problem is that, more often than not, these exercises are not related to ...


1

Some other ideas: For each project, number of open risk items (registered into the risks database), maybe a computed number from risk system (risk probability * risk cost / project total cost, etc) number of critical issues (or an history-chart of the number of issues, to see the trends) (issues should be non-trivial ones, that is worth taking action on a ...


1

At one of my previous companies I replaced a 100+ slide PowerPoint deck with a simple excel spreadsheet. This was for a division that shipped close to a million units a quarter across a number of product lines. It was highly successful. We had one tab for new projects, one tab for sustaining projects and one for field issues. My format included columns for ...


1

It does not sound like you are a consultant at all. A consultant would provide advisory services, usually to a variety of clients concurrently, in determining the best course of future action. Within the realm of software development specifically, which from the sound of it you are involved in, a consultant would assist an external client in designing a ...


1

The interview is only one part of the hiring process. Speaking with references and past employers is another important aspect. Use the interview to learn more about the candidate, their experiences and expertise claimed. Then, speak with references and past employers to validate/get another perspective on the same experiences and skills claimed.


1

Would you hire a magician without asking them to show you some magic tricks? - Joel Spolsky. Read Jole's guide: The Guerrilla Guide to Interviewing


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