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The Scrum Guide does not talk about prioritizing the Product Backlog. Instead, it talks about ordering the Product Backlog. Priority is only one factor that can be used to determine the ordering of the Product Backlog. Dependencies between work items is another factor, but the Product Owner can choose any factors that are appropriate to help maximize the ...


5

I cannot answer this from a scrum standpoint; however, in other priority schema, the ability to perform is part of the criteria. To say it another way, both risk and cost are criteria and the labor and materials to do a task contribute to both of those two things. If you don't have either the numbers or the skills, both risk and cost climb and that would ...


4

Your description of the conflict displayed perhaps two root causes: a need for management to take action about the team capacity the lack of one key element in conflict resolution: listening to the other part. Here is why: there aren't really that many stories appropriate to their skillsets and levels. Is this statement unanimously agreed upon by the ...


4

This is a reasonable concern from the Product Owner. While another answer was correct that the Scrum Guide says it is ordered, it also discusses how the PO orders it: Ordering the items in the Product Backlog to best achieve goals and missions; Optimizing the value of the work the Development Team performs; However, while there may be tension between the ...


4

Simple answer: If your client asks you to do something, you're not a consultant. If they ask you what they should do, you're a consultant.


3

You can always call yourself consultant, because the definition of a consultant is not that strict: A person who provides expert advice professionally. You are person (check), you are an expert, therefore you can give expert advices (check), and you'll plan to earn your living from doing it - you are a professional - (check). Due to the nature of the job - ...


2

Coding Exercises: You'll hear 'coding exercises' a lot as the answer to this question. And while these exercises certainly have some value (they certainly test a person's desire for the position as they have to do up to 20 hours of unpaid work!) you should use them carefully. One problem is that, more often than not, these exercises are not related to ...


2

When this happened - over 2 decades ago - at a company I worked for, I was given the title of Morale Officer! (Besides for my regular job.) I was given a small budget and was charged with ensuring the company was a fun place to be in. E.g.: I spent money on ping-pong balls for the ping-pong table, and made sure it was in use, often. Nosh is always ...


1

Some other ideas: For each project, number of open risk items (registered into the risks database), maybe a computed number from risk system (risk probability * risk cost / project total cost, etc) number of critical issues (or an history-chart of the number of issues, to see the trends) (issues should be non-trivial ones, that is worth taking action on a ...


1

At one of my previous companies I replaced a 100+ slide PowerPoint deck with a simple excel spreadsheet. This was for a division that shipped close to a million units a quarter across a number of product lines. It was highly successful. We had one tab for new projects, one tab for sustaining projects and one for field issues. My format included columns for ...


1

It does not sound like you are a consultant at all. A consultant would provide advisory services, usually to a variety of clients concurrently, in determining the best course of future action. Within the realm of software development specifically, which from the sound of it you are involved in, a consultant would assist an external client in designing a ...


1

Bottom line is your career is a project... so figure out what the end-state is, the requirements you need to get there and stay focused on these so that you can get what you want according to your schedule. Define schedule. Decide what your planning horizon is for your career. You can have more than one (e.g. horizons of 2 years, 5 years, 10 years) Define ...


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