13

Raise the matter first during a retrospective and find out how the team feel about it. One time I can see when visual feedback might be important is during sprint planning. In planning sessions the SM may need to guide both the PO and the team and will want to know that everyone on the team is comfortable with the sprint goal. There are alternatives to video ...


10

Disengaged stakeholders will threaten your success, as you know. They will remain a threat until either they are turned around or removed, literally. Now, I typically segment stakeholders into two groups (I know, oversimplified): participating with seemingly no issues, stakeholders that are in a constant state of opposition. On the surface, it would seem ...


10

I think it is valuable to make a distinction here between a need you have for yourself vs a need the team has that you are helping them with. If this is a personal ask, then servant leadership has nothing to do with it. It's a request from one co-worker to another (or a bunch of others). You could raise this at a retro or in conversation - that's largely up ...


7

You have to GET them engaged. And you can only do that by getting them to have a stake in the outcome. Here's where part of the problem lies - the three PM's (you being one of them) have a problem; of that group only you were tasked to solve it. So you've started off down a point in their eyes. Regardless of the reality, to them it looks like you're now ...


7

Adding to the excellent answers you have already. Perhaps consider asking the team to do an experiment? Make the change you propose for a given amount of time and then review if it made things better or worse. There is often less resistance to an experiment than to something perceived as a permanent change.


6

Your team is the benchmark. If last week you weren't doing Test-Driven-Development, but you all agreed that was something you wanted to change for the next go-round, and you did...there you go. If you decided to give it a go - but didn't - well, you didn't follow through...not the end of the world, but could probably do with some follow-through and ...


6

Leaders of teams are not only because they were officially designated as said leader of a team. They lead because they assume the role and once assumed they are the de facto project manager and are responsible and accountable for the project in the exact same way as if they were officially designated. You cannot lead the team, be looked at as the leader of ...


5

You are perceived as the team leader, so in the absence of anyone with that formal title, you have to take on that role. You already meet regularly with the CEO as though you have that formal role, so, by default, you lead the team. I suggest that you talk to the new team member, find out whether it is realistic that he can develop the new capability in a ...


5

Formal Definitions At this time, there are no formal definitions of maturity across agile methodologies. However, the Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) framework uses five levels to define process maturity: Level 1 - Initial (Chaotic) Level 2 - Repeatable Level 3 - Defined Level 4 - Managed Level 5 - Optimizing If you're looking for a formal ...


5

I'm an advocate of not having people reporting into other members of their immediate team. Having a line manager in the room can affect the honesty of things like retrospectives and it avoids some awkward situations (would you want to pair program with someone who just put you/you just put on performance review?). At my place, we have a lead developers who ...


5

Having coached several hackathon teams I can share this learnings: Make clear your willing to lead, and be prepared to sell yourself and your idea to the others, people come there with the same level of expectation you have (can I contribute to this? Will I learn something? Will it be a good experience to work with X or Y? ...), they will choose you as a ...


4

You can hold an online knowledge sharing session,in each session a team member will present a topic in his/her areas of expertise and then s/he uploads it to the wiki then the other team members share their feedback on the wiki page. If the time difference will make it hard to meet online then, the team can agree on reading an article or watch a video on a ...


4

This is a change management issue. Unfortunately, successful management of change - particularly negative change like what your organization is going through - has to start well in advance of the change. If this hasn't been done then you are looking at picking up the pieces. And you can't pick up the pieces by yourself. The key is getting several levels of ...


4

Many interview questions are less about the answer you give and more about your thought process. I didn't do your interview, so I don't know what the interviewer was looking for, but I could guess that they wanted to hear more about your management style. Your answer is sort of the standard safe answer. Boiled down, it sounds like "People have many ...


4

The Scrum answer would be that there isn't a team leader. The Scrum Guide states that: Scrum recognizes no titles for Development Team members, regardless of the work being performed by the person The things that you mention - communication with the Product Owner, discovery of solutions, definition of direction, delivery of a complete solution - all fall ...


4

Good question. I'm unclear on some of the details that inspire your question, so I'm going to provide three different answers Risk Matrices are dangerous to your health. You say, I fall back to very crude ways of communicating priorities, by for example saying that a task or a project has "medium" priority. Tony Cox and others have done some ...


3

It is a bit counterintuitive, but in situation like this feeling safe - just a little bit - is very important. It will motivate people. Of course, nobody feels safe - not even you -, but you as a leader can do something about it. Be positive, but not overly positive. A negative leader cannot provide a safe environment, and an overly positive leader is not ...


3

This is not specific to this question but rather general advice for resolving these types of inter-personal issues: try to put yourself in their shoes first. what do they gain from the current behavior? what's their benefit in resisting the change you'd like to happen? (Retaining influence, protecting their work, ...) how can they benefit in similar/same/...


3

Short answer: communicate. Do what is called a retrospective. Long answer: The only way to resolve this situation without bad blood, is to talk about it in the whole team. Tell you teammate that you have concerns regarding his work. Explain your position and let him explain his. Then try to find a solution. Don't try to force anything on anyone. It's hard ...


3

Team Leaders and Line Managers are different depending on your organisation structure. A Line Manager is generally used in a vertical structure with responsibility for direct supervision of line workers, in this case, developers. They duties such as scheduling, training, hiring, firing and writing performance evaluations. A Team Leader works a lot closer ...


3

The gold standard is "in person" Here is a good depiction of the effectiveness of different modes of communication from Alistair Cockburn: One of the twelve principles behind the Agile Manifesto is: The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and within a development team is face-to-face conversation. I have managed teams ...


3

Making a decision and taking action, even if it is not the best choice, is more productive than doing nothing. This is something that the team should understand. What is the root cause of this decision paralysis? Is there fear of repercussions for making the "wrong" choice? Is there apathy? Without finding it, the problem (or others which are related) ...


3

TL;DR You probably don't want to hear this, but the developer is probably right about your lack of experience, although based on what you've said they are addressing it in a very unconstructive way. From your own description, you clearly lack effective authority, influence, and delineation of roles on your project, making this more a question of fitness for ...


2

If The Disengaged feel like they have already learned enough to avoid the problems in the future, then maybe you can start with that. Start a process with them where you are working to codify what everyone feels will work. Maybe as part of that process they will start to become more engaged and the process can start to move forward. I've been in a ...


2

I am of the opinion that it is more valuable to compare your team's current maturity against where you want to be rather than against where you started. To this end: Define a reasonable, achieveable future state. This definition needs to be based on your business requirements and not on what a text book says. Key to success here is engaging your team in ...


2

There are universal signs of team maturity. Use the Forming, Storming, Norming, Performing model as an example. The stages just in framework give a clue as to what you might see as your team matures. When you just form, you can expect to see civility between the members and high morale, but performance will be low, and direction from the boss will be high....


2

This answer depends a bit on your culture. A matrix structure is not uncommon in the US. With this option, the engineers would report to one leader for their technical issues, perhaps the Architect or the Lead engineer. However, for non-technical issues, the PM would provide the leadership necessary. This matrix structure allows workers to get what they need ...


2

Read Belbin's Team Role Theory and French and Raven's Power Types. There are other theories, as well, so a bit of research will uncover a ton of academic conversations around your issue you are facing. The key take away is that high functioning teams gravitate its individuals to play certain, necessary roles that make it a high functioning team. It is ...


2

This is a tough one to answer. I think a lot of discussion on this topic one might find out there is not much more than hyperbole. There have been some studies on leadership, where some traits were identified such as a high degree of motivation and drive, tolerance of high stress, competitiveness, impatience, tendency to be vision oriented, and other so ...


2

This is not an easy question to answer. The answer varies from company to company, from culture to culture. So collected some existing qualities that I can resonate with. I have found this list on u99: Command authority naturally Possess quick sifting abilities, knowing what to note and what to ignore Set, observe, and re-evaluate project priorities ...


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