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A vision is typically a high level view of what you ultimately want to achieve as a result of the project. You would use it to describe the project, identify stakeholders, define success criteria, and goals and priorities. You may also use such a thing to begin to define the most important assumptions, dependencies, constraints, and risks. In Crossing the ...


5

To me, this is a Vision Breakdown Structure, just like a work breakdown structure. You are taking something from the abstract and strategy level and breaking it down to the very specific and tactical. It is easier to see if you think about a product with which we are all familiar, like a car. Vision: To be able to transport people and material quickly ...


4

What are common trainings for those soft skills? in my case it was a book ("Getting things done" by David Allen). Imho, following GTD methodology a great way to become organized and result-oriented Defining projects, breaking them into actionable items and assigning contexts really helps to achieve desired results


4

Experience is necessary for capability and competency growth; however, the weight we tend to put on experience, I believe, is grossly overrated. The velocity and degree of capability and competency growth over a period of time practicing an activity can range from decay to something very extreme over a short period of time. So, in the aggregate, when you ...


3

As a project manager, you want your team not only finishes within tight deadlines, but also develop. This is in fact a reasonable need that managers in general should think about. My first advice is, like others have already comment: Don’t separate time to learn from time to work. Reason: Developers will see the “time to learn” as “time to do anything they ...


3

As usual, the answer is: it entirely depends on the context. Learning is not an on/off process, nor you can ensure proper learning in all conditions by allowing people to have, let's say, 1h a day of "learning time". This might be beneficial for some people under some contexts and completely useless for other people in a different context. Topics are ...


3

I completely second David (as usual). Having experience MAY increase the likeliness of a professional being a good manager, but it's not mandatory. I believe this "increase" might come pretty much from the past experiences this professional might have been through in the past. Also, it seems you're over evaluating the study degrees... they give you ...


3

TL;DR Firstly, there is no canonical answer to this, but there are some pragmatic solutions. Secondly, you can't estimate what you can't measure. You therefore need to devise a proxy metric to create your estimate or to graph your cone of uncertainty. Thirdly, the project's assumptions and risks (particularly including schedule risks) should be defined and ...


2

Communication : ability to communicate within ALL levels of an organization. That is a skill this is not given to everybody, adapting your speech to the audience ; Leadership : PM is a leadership role, it is well known that someone with no leadership in that role will not go far. You have to be strategic, pick your battles carefully and identify the right ...


2

There is no magic formula here that would apply to all projects. What i would do is to get the estimates and them compute, like this: First, make a plan based on the assumption that people are familiar with RTOS. Then, get those answers: What is the training required to learn RTOS? After this training, how much time people will need to be able to be ...


2

Take this with a grain of salt because my corporate world may be different from your corporate world. Vision is your richly-imagined future, addressing what it is and why you want to be there, and what your guiding principles are. An example is the mission/vision statement for Target stores "Our mission is to make Target the preferred shopping destination ...


2

No, you shouldn't allow it. You should set an expectation and reinforce a culture where the continuous improvement (CI) is the norm. There is no magic hour split, but if people are spending 100% of their time trying to become more efficient at what they do (aka just doing short-term work) they will become less effective at their jobs over the long-term. ...


2

This concept I believe also falls under the term "Coaching Circles" in the agile community. A way to review or even model practices. In my experience it takes a fairly organizationally advanced company to put these practices in place. Where coding katas do have opinion, it's opinion about how to tackle a technical problem. Project management scenario work ...


2

Since the question has no hard boundaries and some points are left open, I'll try to have an abstract view on it in order to provide some ideas and ways you might find useful. Is your question about "Lunch and Learn" explicitly? If not then "transfer of knowledge" and "learning" is the focus. Some ideas: Office-internal hackathons - Invite non-developers ...


2

Can you be a good Project Manager without experience? Certainly. It has been done before, and it will be done again. Consider Joel Spolsky, who founded Stack Exchange, who wrote Joel on Software, and who founded Fog Creek Software. In his words, "I started my career at Microsoft, a little software company outside of Seattle, where I was a program manager ...


2

As a former developer who is now IT project manager, I can suggest the following (in addition to Bogdan's very good answer): Learning project management: Not only read the material, but you may also pursue a certification such as PMP. This has the added benefit that it shows up on your CV, and most project management job ads I've seen lately are either ...


1

It's good that you are reading books and taking courses. Keep doing that. It gives you knowledge and tools that you can use to manage projects. Make sure you also read the PMBOK and things on various Agile methods like Scrum and Kanban. You might find some information terse, or complicated (the PMBOK is not all that easy to digest, for example), but it's ...


1

You should assign resources to the tasks, and the resources have their rates. That should not bee too much of work for you. MSP then calculates all the components. For Actual costs, you can override the calculations. If MSP is too cumbersome to use in this context, you should revert to good old Excel (and maybe interconnect those two)


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There are concrete approaches to analyze a troubled project. The best that I have witnessed, being on both sides of the analysis, is an Issue Based Method. You can easily google this method to learn the specifics, but it is essentially a great approach when 1) you do not know what the cause is and 2) you do not know what the solution will be. The ...


1

It sounds like you've already identified a way to identify your work as 'projects'. Once you've done that, it should be easy to work PM techniques and tools into your work, although you might have to do it on your own time. You can find a bunch of templates at ProjectManagement.com for the main documents. Don't get caught up in them too much though: use what ...


1

First off, mentoring is all about helping someone perform or develop through improving their behaviour, communications, or other changes. Mentoring someone in a field outside your own has some challenges, but these can all be managed. As a mentor it is not your job to teach the specific technical subject. In your scenario, the things you can help with ...


1

Proactive - Anticipate risks, seek to resolve dependencies and risks before they derail the project


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Effective Communication That is to concisely deliver message in different ways to different people at the beginning and add details and background in a logical manner so that even a dummy can understand your meaning. It does not necessarily to present like Steve Jobs or Bill Gates. Just to be natural to speak and be sophisticated to think before you speak. ...


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