6

The idea that "everyone is a developer" and "everyone writes code" aren't the same thing. In this sense, "developer" does not mean "programmer", but "a person or thing that develops something". UX designers, programmers, testers, business analysts, and others are all involved in the development of a product. ...


5

there are no roles on the team (a "cross-functional" team where "all team members are developers") One thing I want to note is what exactly cross-functional means: it is not a team where every member can do everything. Rather, it is a team that is capable of doing everything. What I would suggest foremost is confirming what exactly ...


3

Sad to say, but too many places are still using the "walk around and guess" methodology. The main component is a deadline - decided upon by management, usually - and a hi-level concept of what needs to be done. It consists of mainly guessing, bluffing your way and having random long-winded meetings that never create action items and have no follow ...


2

Everything mostly copy-pasted from Wikipedia. Agile refers to a group of software development methodologies based on iterative development, where requirements and solutions evolve via collaboration between self-organizing cross-functional teams. Rapid application development (RAD) is a software development methodology, which favors iterative development ...


2

Agile is not a methodology, much less a project management methodology. Organisational agility is all about having a organisation that is responsive to change with empowered teams. The Agile Manifesto for Software Development is a set of ideas about how to do software development work, and various frameworks and management approaches have been devised that ...


2

This is the type of project where it pays to spend some time at the beginning to identify external dependencies. A dependency is a potential risk, so if you can identify the nature of the external dependencies, you can put something about those characteristics in the contract with your partner organizations. To expand on my comment above, you might for ...


1

Kanban or something based on it sounds like a reasonable fit with your requirements. A board where work can be easily referenced according to the stage / state it is in, with clearly visible workloads is what Kanban is good at. I have run several pieces of work where we used a tabular form of tracking the status of each component, moving between different ...


1

Apart from adopting a more formal Kanban approach, is there any other approach that might be more relevant for similar projects where there are many unknowns and variables that can't be controlled directly within the project? There are many aspects of Kanban and agile in general that you can benefit from, even when you have many external dependencies. For ...


1

I'm not sure what methodology maps best to this example. It is, as Bogdan notes in his comment, mostly to do with negotiation - getting the other party to the point where they will actually implement the upgrade. Kanban offers a comfortable way to visualize the progress you have made on the different upgradeable components, but one critical kanban element ...


1

Basically PMBoK contains best practices and is not exactly related to any methodology. More or less it could be applied to a big amount of methodologies. As an example here is an article of relationship between Agile software development techniques and those based on the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide): https://www.pmi.org/learning/...


1

Apart from ashes999 great answer there is one more notable mention of how to introduce Agile into non-IT organization or team. I really like the part about not going with all the buzzwords and working mainly through Agile values perspective. There is a 5 step method according to this post: https://teamhood.com/agile/agile-for-non-it/ Educate people about ...


1

Agile works best when operating in the Complex domain. The Cynefin Framework classifies projects into four domains: Simple, Complicated, Complex, and Chaotic. Agile works best when you're working in the Complex domain. In the Simple domain, you're working with a well-understood area and you're able to complete it simply by following a set of rules and ...


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