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The Scrum Guide does not talk about prioritizing the Product Backlog. Instead, it talks about ordering the Product Backlog. Priority is only one factor that can be used to determine the ordering of the Product Backlog. Dependencies between work items is another factor, but the Product Owner can choose any factors that are appropriate to help maximize the ...


5

I cannot answer this from a scrum standpoint; however, in other priority schema, the ability to perform is part of the criteria. To say it another way, both risk and cost are criteria and the labor and materials to do a task contribute to both of those two things. If you don't have either the numbers or the skills, both risk and cost climb and that would ...


4

Your description of the conflict displayed perhaps two root causes: a need for management to take action about the team capacity the lack of one key element in conflict resolution: listening to the other part. Here is why: there aren't really that many stories appropriate to their skillsets and levels. Is this statement unanimously agreed upon by the ...


4

This is a reasonable concern from the Product Owner. While another answer was correct that the Scrum Guide says it is ordered, it also discusses how the PO orders it: Ordering the items in the Product Backlog to best achieve goals and missions; Optimizing the value of the work the Development Team performs; However, while there may be tension between the ...


4

Mark Wallace is correct that this is primarily a people issue not a technology or Scrum-technique issue. Fortunately there are some people-techniques that work to resolve certain sorts of people issues. Your issue here is resolvable. Daniel's answer touches (brilliantly) on the phenomenon here: that different personalities can have wildly different work ...


4

You may have a difficult conversation to have with the stakeholder. To be perfectly blunt, work with no pressure or stress is called a hobby. I don't recommend you lead with that. What might help is this: Agile (and it sounds like Scrum would be particularly helpful) focuses on getting work complete through small increments. You start with a foundation idea ...


4

Wow, huge question! Let's talk about: Capabilities: Personal skills and knowledge Talent: How much effort is necessary to be good at something? Potential: The end of development within a specific domain To identify the next good PM you need to: Identify the required capabilities within your company. I would prioritise leadership and communications like ...


3

Here's the problem for organizations and predicting future job success: What are the attributes and work behaviors consistent with a particular job role's success? How do you observe or test for those attributes and work behaviors that produce both RELIABLE and VALID results, minimizing biases? How do you pay for this? For a job role, if you try to do ...


2

Coding Exercises: You'll hear 'coding exercises' a lot as the answer to this question. And while these exercises certainly have some value (they certainly test a person's desire for the position as they have to do up to 20 hours of unpaid work!) you should use them carefully. One problem is that, more often than not, these exercises are not related to ...


2

MS Project (or similar tools) is good for to schedule management related PM activities,e.g.: highlight and visualise relationships (prerequisites etc.) track delays and identify the consequences Having (at least) those two capabilities it might help you to track and prioritise your activities. I can't imagine what to do with grades within MS Project ...


2

These days there are a lot of confusion on the role of a Project Manager in the software development arena based on the adoption of Agile methods like Scrum. Companies and recruiters are mistakenly inclined to think that a Scrum Master (yes, the one that did 2 days course and passed an open book test) can instantly replace a Project Manager, and that’s why ...


2

Each environment or organization requires its own unique set of skills. Hence, some kind of generic are: 1) To be able to build SDLC from scratch (at least its initial version); 2) To be able to facilitate such ceremonies as work decomposition and planning; 3) To be able to track the process around the project; 4) To be an open person for all the parties ...


2

Communication : ability to communicate within ALL levels of an organization. That is a skill this is not given to everybody, adapting your speech to the audience ; Leadership : PM is a leadership role, it is well known that someone with no leadership in that role will not go far. You have to be strategic, pick your battles carefully and identify the right ...


1

Proactive - Anticipate risks, seek to resolve dependencies and risks before they derail the project


1

Effective Communication That is to concisely deliver message in different ways to different people at the beginning and add details and background in a logical manner so that even a dummy can understand your meaning. It does not necessarily to present like Steve Jobs or Bill Gates. Just to be natural to speak and be sophisticated to think before you speak. ...


1

What Technical skills is "A Must" for PM to be successful [...] in Software Development? Obviously you need to be able to handle office software. Like an email client, a word processor, something to make plans and tables. Whatever it may be. And you will need to be able to switch between vendors, because there is no such things as a "...


1

Excellent Communication skills as PM spend about 80% of his time in communication between team, management, client and stakeholders, the technical skills comes Second but what is most important of it knowleadge of tools and software background.


1

People who climb in business are those that make money for that business, which means they can sell. That means salesability, serviceability, politics, perseverance, adaptibility become key skills. This is true for every business that sells something. And these skills need to be present far earlier than maybe one might expect. People who can sell with or ...


1

No definite "musts" but an understanding of developer toolchains, software stacks and techniques like CI, source control and virtualization would be an advantage. Also, knowing how to get the best out of project management tools like Jira.


1

I think you need to do some research on the range of pay for a programmer. You seem to be assuming the range is small but I do not think your assumption is valid. Also, you are conflating a judgment--"too low"--with your observations of a programmer's pay. Everyone is entitled to their opinion of such a judgment so, if you think the pay is too low, then ...


1

Focus from client perspective and business perspective while development. This is key point, be a solution expert and not only developer.


1

Does project management mean managing people? Not necessarily. The PMBOK describes three major organizational structures: the functional organization (where staff report to functional managers); the projectized organization (where staff report to project managers) and the matrix organization, where staff report to functional managers but have project ...


1

I made a very simple Kanban board for myself. The columns are "New", "Waiting on Me", "Waiting on someone else", and "Done". It's great for times when I finally have chance to catch up with a teammate with limited/tricky availability - everything's right there ready to be discussed. The categories are broad. I have one row at the top for "Red Hot" tasks. ...


1

I've used it for managing my personal backlog/"to do" list and found it to be very beneficial, and would definitely recommend trying it for a couple weeks. Just like a project-focused kanban board, it immediately provided visibility on where things were getting stuck or slowed, how much time I was allocating to different areas or types of work, and helped me ...


1

I've been using Kanban for project management for a couple of months and I find it really useful. First, I try to divide entire project into smaller pieces, steps or "levels". Then I think of tasks which have to be done. Finally I assign those task to each level. I try to work only with tasks from the first level. If I have some ideas regarding different ...


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