14

Have you asked them why they get it wrong so frequently? Do they think they're just careless when they do it or do they believe there is an underlying issue that causes them to not pay it as much attention as they should? It could be that they're frequently task switching or feel under a lot of pressure to get these sort of tasks done quickly to move onto ...


13

The Scrum Guide does not talk about prioritizing the Product Backlog. Instead, it talks about ordering the Product Backlog. Priority is only one factor that can be used to determine the ordering of the Product Backlog. Dependencies between work items is another factor, but the Product Owner can choose any factors that are appropriate to help maximize the ...


9

This can be challenging, it is always possible that someone tests well but can't perform in the "real world". In the past when I've interviewed candidates I've prioritized as follows: Personality. You can always train a new hire to become technically competent. You can't ever train them to be a decent human being if they aren't one already. Under this ...


5

Building on Marcin's response. The Guerilla guide to interviewing (latest version is best!) is very useful. It helped me a lot when I first had to evaluate technical staff for hiring few years ago during an expansion spurt (I was hiring electronics development and embedded programming, not just general purpose coders for enterprise software) I'm not 100%...


5

Firstly, the interview as a predictor of future performance has a very low validity. Even structured, it is not helpful or very useful. Testing for cognitive ability and conducting "job tests" are two of the leading indicators of performance, with a validity approaching or around r0.5 (Hunter & Hunter 1984). So creating assignments or test questions ...


5

If the higher-level peers are spotting the problems, they must be using some kind of heuristics, tests or monitoring to do so. I suggest pairing up your higher-level peers with the lower-level people next time they check for problems, so that the lower-level people will understand how to test and monitor their own work. Once they have that understanding, ...


5

I cannot answer this from a scrum standpoint; however, in other priority schema, the ability to perform is part of the criteria. To say it another way, both risk and cost are criteria and the labor and materials to do a task contribute to both of those two things. If you don't have either the numbers or the skills, both risk and cost climb and that would ...


4

What are common trainings for those soft skills? in my case it was a book ("Getting things done" by David Allen). Imho, following GTD methodology a great way to become organized and result-oriented Defining projects, breaking them into actionable items and assigning contexts really helps to achieve desired results


4

To answer your question : move them to another team. So that they get a fresh chance to prove themselves. My thoughts : Making a technical guy do this kind of routine work is not good. You should get this whole thing automated. If your boss / you is not convinced that a small investment is not needed in automating this, then I feel sad for your juniors. ...


4

Wow, huge question! Let's talk about: Capabilities: Personal skills and knowledge Talent: How much effort is necessary to be good at something? Potential: The end of development within a specific domain To identify the next good PM you need to: Identify the required capabilities within your company. I would prioritise leadership and communications like ...


4

You may have a difficult conversation to have with the stakeholder. To be perfectly blunt, work with no pressure or stress is called a hobby. I don't recommend you lead with that. What might help is this: Agile (and it sounds like Scrum would be particularly helpful) focuses on getting work complete through small increments. You start with a foundation idea ...


4

Mark Wallace is correct that this is primarily a people issue not a technology or Scrum-technique issue. Fortunately there are some people-techniques that work to resolve certain sorts of people issues. Your issue here is resolvable. Daniel's answer touches (brilliantly) on the phenomenon here: that different personalities can have wildly different work ...


4

This is a reasonable concern from the Product Owner. While another answer was correct that the Scrum Guide says it is ordered, it also discusses how the PO orders it: Ordering the items in the Product Backlog to best achieve goals and missions; Optimizing the value of the work the Development Team performs; However, while there may be tension between the ...


4

Your description of the conflict displayed perhaps two root causes: a need for management to take action about the team capacity the lack of one key element in conflict resolution: listening to the other part. Here is why: there aren't really that many stories appropriate to their skillsets and levels. Is this statement unanimously agreed upon by the ...


3

The most effective interview technique I have found for interviewing programmers is a white board session where we work through a real life case study followed by a programming test. The white board session gives a good idea of how well the candidate can articulate and share both their understanding of the problem and how they would approach solving it. ...


3

Here's the problem for organizations and predicting future job success: What are the attributes and work behaviors consistent with a particular job role's success? How do you observe or test for those attributes and work behaviors that produce both RELIABLE and VALID results, minimizing biases? How do you pay for this? For a job role, if you try to do ...


3

This is personal opinion of course, but in this situation, I would take the two lower level people and put them in charge of double checking each others work. Limit the amount of reviewing done by superiors, and give them some responsibility.


3

Another way to look at this is, if work allows, to give the job to two people - one to QA. If the same people do this, then they could be swapped around each time. At least this gives two sets of eyes. When keying boring data, errors are bound to happen. I'm pretty long in the tooth now, and when I got my first IT job back in the early 80's at a high street ...


3

What you need to do is an Ishikawa diagram (aka fishbone) with the involved team members. This will help you find the root cause and address it. process people materials equipment management environment You mentioned automation, but you don't seem to think process is the problem. You mentioned repeated training, so you don't think management is the ...


3

If he is making the same mistake again and again , are we sure that the peers who are reviewing his work or him , not applying the same(and not working) measure to guage him again and again Is the review process working for the person in question ? Basically, has someone looked at why is this happening repeatedly ? Lack of skill, motivation,grudge or ...


3

I would NEVER assume that peer review is a waste of efforts. On the contrary, it saves you a lot of time fixing bugs that otherwise could go into production and cost you a lot more. In your case, I would force peer review even before the SQL is executed. Make someone else (better two) look at it before executing. Catching an error in a query is faster and ...


2

Communication : ability to communicate within ALL levels of an organization. That is a skill this is not given to everybody, adapting your speech to the audience ; Leadership : PM is a leadership role, it is well known that someone with no leadership in that role will not go far. You have to be strategic, pick your battles carefully and identify the right ...


2

Here is my 2 cents: 1) Ensure that the documentation, queries etc are in the appropriate version control system. 2) Escalate to the functional manager the technical member reports to. 3) If the situation occurs again after 1 and 2, ask for a replacement resource that might be a better fit for the maintenance effort.


2

The time during the interview is too small in order to learn about the coding skills of a developer, however it is important to know more about his personality, so have a face-to-face discussion. When I get the CV of a new candidate I immediately start checking for code from her or him on github in order to see how he or she does the coding. If I don't find ...


2

I would advise you NOT to disclose these types of issues. Instead, hire a therapist. On the job, your boss is accountable for the successful completion of whatever it is your team builds or provides. He is already coping with performance variability of his tools, his processes and controls, and his team. He already knows the human fragility--physical and ...


2

Coding Exercises: You'll hear 'coding exercises' a lot as the answer to this question. And while these exercises certainly have some value (they certainly test a person's desire for the position as they have to do up to 20 hours of unpaid work!) you should use them carefully. One problem is that, more often than not, these exercises are not related to ...


2

MS Project (or similar tools) is good for to schedule management related PM activities,e.g.: highlight and visualise relationships (prerequisites etc.) track delays and identify the consequences Having (at least) those two capabilities it might help you to track and prioritise your activities. I can't imagine what to do with grades within MS Project ...


2

Each environment or organization requires its own unique set of skills. Hence, some kind of generic are: 1) To be able to build SDLC from scratch (at least its initial version); 2) To be able to facilitate such ceremonies as work decomposition and planning; 3) To be able to track the process around the project; 4) To be an open person for all the parties ...


2

These days there are a lot of confusion on the role of a Project Manager in the software development arena based on the adoption of Agile methods like Scrum. Companies and recruiters are mistakenly inclined to think that a Scrum Master (yes, the one that did 2 days course and passed an open book test) can instantly replace a Project Manager, and that’s why ...


1

Focus from client perspective and business perspective while development. This is key point, be a solution expert and not only developer.


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