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TL; DR Project selection is the job of the project sponsor, product manager, or steering committee. It is not the job of the project manager. Very Bad Things™ (mostly for you) will often result from this. Why You Shouldn't Do What You're Doing Part of the problem here is that it seems like a project manager is being asked to select and justify a ...


5

According to the PMBOK, a Portfolio is a collection of projects or programs and other work that are grouped together to facilitate effective management of that work. So, with only one project, strictly speaking, you also have one portfolio. Also you probably wouldn't call it that... Portfolio Management then becomes the centralized management of one or more ...


4

The confusion here can sometimes come from people using the term "program" when we would technically mean "project" in the organizational framework (afterall a "program" could be your project!). You are correct in that strategy is the common linkage from project > program > portfolio. It's often thought of as a pyramid with projects at the bottom, but the ...


3

Portfolio Kanban boards apply to multiple contexts. Here are 3 specific examples - You could use it in a product development context to track high-level Portfolio Themes or Epics, under which you can have user stories on an "execution board". In a corporate IT or business environment, you can use a Portfolio Kanban board to track "Strategic Objectives" ...


3

In my experience a Programme is a collection of projects where each project delivers part of the overall programme outcomes (i.e the programme is like a super-project but with several substantial sub-projects), whereas a Portfolio is merely a collection of projects managed together (like a portfolio of stocks you may have invested in). I have also seen ...


2

Think like a small business owner One approach to making better decisions in such situations is to think of your department or section as a small business. Which Project will you opt to do if you were a small business? If you were tight for cash, don't know where the cash is going to come from for your next payroll or for next month's rent, you will opt ...


2

For the sake of maximum simplicity, let's say you have two projects that will take the same amount of time to complete (3 months) and will deliver the same benefit when they are complete ($10 per month). I'll also assume that you intend to do both projects eventually, assuming nothing more important comes in first. One way to decide which to start is to ...


2

Just to make it a bit clear between Portfolio and Project Management Portfolio referred to as : "Doing the right work" Project Management referred to as: "Doing the Work right" So in the Portfolio case you try to get all the projects be evaluated, selected, prioritised and then allocate resources to it. Portfolio process impacts the ...


2

If you use Microsoft Excel and want to have an easy transition to a tool that allows you to aggregate data and display them in dashboards, then I suggest you try Smartsheet. Smartsheet looks like Excel and has some (but not all) of Excel's functionalities. What it adds is that you share the sheets, and you can easily display data in dashboards. With ...


2

I am not sure what you lose in a single Team Project? You are either using TFVC which allows you to secure at the folder level, and remove inheritance for greater control. Or you are using Git which is secured at the Repository level. Either way you can control which groups of users have access to which code. You can have view only access for some code, and ...


2

It sounds like you lack transparency and trust with the customer. If each Story represents value for the customer then the customer should approve, view, and order those things. That said, you can achieve this in TFS. If you create the following Area Paths: -Internal --Team 1 --Team 2 -External You can secure work items within Internal to be internal ...


2

Mr. Espina has offered the textbook standard answer and I agree with his answer. That list is a bit granular, and I'd like to add a few more general metrics that would help me to understand and interpret the information collected. I'm looking for an "elevator speech set" - a set of numbers that can be presented intelligibly on a single slide/ ...


2

The core metrics are: Cost variance: current period, cumulative to date, and at completion Revenue Variance (if seller of services): current period, cumulative to date, and at completion Profit Margin Variance (if seller of services): current period, cumulative to date, and at completion Schedule variance: current period, cumulative to date, and at ...


1

I think the process of scoring and prioritizing projects, no matter its size and complexity, should generally be the same; however, based on size and complexity, the authority at different clip levels, the rigor and formality, and the controls would be different. For example, a business case for a $30,000, 8-month project might take all of two slides while ...


1

Ask them. There's no possible way for us, strangers on the internet, to be able to know with certainty what information your management needs. So, ask them. I suggest compiling a list of all possible types of information you could provide them (just the types (e.g. estimated time, actual time, team members, process, etc.), not the data themselves (5 weeks, ...


1

If your organization is following PRINCE2 and/or MSP or the whole P3O/P3M3 standards, then for project management using PRINCE2 there is a formal but optional role/department for Project Support, which may help in providing administrative services or advice and guidance on the use of project management tools or configuration management. However, for ...


1

TL;DR Most projects deliver features or value (however the organization defines value for itself), but projects are unlikely to generate profit directly. Generally speaking, profits can only be generated once a shippable product is released into a sales channel, and the revenue from the sold product exceeds its associated costs. Track Value Instead of ...


1

Short answer: Yes Long answer: Yes, never care what they do or think.


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Moving directly is based on the perceived trust of the shareholders and executives. The speed at which you can change this relationship, totally depends on the cultural willingness of the organisation to firstly acknowledge they want to change, and then to follow this through with a committed approach. Its going to ultimately boil down to the working ...


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