10

TL; DR The author's leading premise is that cost containment is more important for Project A than for Project B. This is almost axiomatic if you do the math. Purpose of Project Controls Project controls are the processes and procedures used to keep a project within acceptable variance of the project's goals, especially in the area of projected cost vs. ...


5

I don't believe it is possible to sort by status changed date. However, given that your requirement is "to have a list of the JIRA tickets that are not moving from one lane to another so that I can intervene on those tickets", you can find all tickets that have not moved in X days. For example: (status = "In Progress" AND status changed to "In Progress" ...


5

Don't Solve the Wrong Problem This is always an X/Y problem. It is almost always an attempt to address systemic organizational failures by "holding employees accountable." Any process or technical control you can apply to tracking employees, rather than tracking productivity directly, is (at best) a proxy for failing to address the underlying issue: you are ...


4

It sounds like one or more of the following could be playing into the current situation. Lack of understanding by the projects of what the PMO is doing. Maybe the PMO is offering the projects exactly what they need, but it hasn't been communicated well. To get some insight into whether this is a factor, do a quick informal survey to see what the projects ...


4

TL;DR [I]t seems counter intuitive that the teams would NOT find inherent value from some or most of the PMO controls...[that] should help them manage their portion of the work[.] Your organization appears to be suffering from a lack of perceived value in the new process controls, as well as a lack of proper "tone at the top" in support of this process ...


3

What you're talking about is creating a 'methodology', and yes, it's a good idea. The methodology is created for the reason you mentioned - so that (most) anyone can step in and keep the project moving, because it follows an established process and requirements. As for what to include - that depends on the project type and what your company feels is ...


3

TL;DR Quality is a widely-recognized project management constraint. To the extent that one can modify the quality controls applied to a project, one can impact the quality of the deliverables. In addition, by adjusting quality, one can impact other constraints that affect (or are affected by) the quality control process such as schedule or budget. Agile ...


2

You can sort by time in status in an issue filter. The query would look like: project = My project and status = "tracked status" order by "[CHART] Time in Status". This will show the list of issues in the right project and status, with the one that has spent the most time in that status at the top of the list.


2

It's possible to setup a system such that your devs need to work on a server you own, and that logs their activity... but that's probably more trouble than it's worth, and it would likely hinder productivity more than help. Beyond that, it would probably take a lot of your time to take whatever data you've gathered and tie it back to what they said they were ...


2

Regular reporting of status within the team is a tool to track performance, and is probably the most commonly used. Unfortunately it isn't a mathy approach, which can cause some stakeholders undue angst. CodeGenome provided some links regarding Earned Schedule in his answer to a question of mine. Willl also provides links regarding control charts in his ...


2

I think CodeGnome nailed it as the thinking the author had as he drafted that language; however, I also think this is a terrible message. I sort of gives permission for sloppy management if you have a high degree of likelihood of an obscene return. It also gives permission to exert a heavy hand on controls if your return is predicted to be small. If my ...


2

Earned Value Management Isn't a Quality Control Framework In the "Limitations" section for EVM, Wikipedia clearly states: EVM has no provision to measure project quality, so it is possible for EVM to indicate a project is under budget, ahead of schedule and scope fully executed, but still have unhappy clients and ultimately unsuccessful results. While ...


2

I think the problem you have outlined is fairly common. In my experience people in general want to see immediate, short-term benefits from initiatives. Longer-term benefits are often discounted altogether if getting to them is perceived as interfering with "real work". I liken it to a man going on a hike who can reduce his load by half at the start but ...


2

Quality has to be a constraint, whether or not it is measurable by itself or is so intrinsic to scope is another question. I disagree with your assertion that you can't control quality and that it cannot be measured. The key is that you have to define what you mean by "quality" up front, in other words how well does a piece of functionality have to work in ...


2

There is only one answer to this question, and I am sure you know it, you have to ask your employees to record the time they are spending and then monitor your records. There is no stealthy magic process that will inform you of what they are really doing. These kinds of questions are usually asked because the employer believes the employees may be slacking ...


2

Are you sure you want this integrated in TFS? If your team is agile and is using the Scrum or MSF Agile template, it's not tracking the data required to create the reports your manager would like to see. And if your team is doing agile properly, then it probably doesn't want to track this data in this way. There are other ways of tracking project ...


1

This is not a feature that comes stock with TFS Depending on your bosses requirements, creating a TFS custom process template may be suitable, depending on how he/she wants to consume the information, e.g., graphs, roll-ups, etc. For more information on custom process templates please reference TFS documentation here. There are 3rd-party tools out there ...


1

I agree with Trevor that you are talking about establishing your methodology and that it is a good idea. Before you just in with both feet, you may want tot do a bit of review of available methodologies that are used in your field. For instance, in many construction projects, a traditional waterfall methodology with most of the artifacts discussed by Trevor ...


1

Some observations: All the teams, including the PMO, are suffering from still maturing processes and capabilities and teaming dynamics. There is a lot of intra- and inter-team conflicts that, while improving, is still adversely impacting performance. Can your organziation handle the pace of change? Are you trying to do too much at once? Are you trying ...


1

The first is to help them acknowledge the fact that there are a lot of conflicts and that there is room for improvement. Followed by an agreement that in order to do achieve different results, then something must change. Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results. - Albert Einstein This opens the door for a ...


1

I think this is an important issue; when project managers actively measure time and cost, but not quality, it is easy to guess which one suffers. The fact the project managers themselves are measured on time and cost more closely the quality does not help either, particularly where organisational culture strongly focuses on short-term efficiency at the ...


1

No, at least not directly. Earned value is strictly a cost control tool and, to a slightly lesser degree, a schedule control tool. However, what EV provides are early clues of an accruing variance and, with analysis, markers that allow you to predict with a good degree of confidence where you are headed. The result of those markers is the action to find ...


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