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Agile Scaling maintains a fairly comprehensive list of scaling frameworks. Their "ASK Matrix" provides some very general information and compares the frameworks on a number of different factors including intended scaling size, coverage levels at team, portfolio, and enterprise, and more. http://www.agilescaling.org/ask-matrix.html


8

You really have too many questions in this one to be able to give specific answers, but I'll give it a go anyway ... First off, I'm a Professional Scrum Trainer with Scrum.org and I teach Scaled Professional Scrum - how to apply Nexus to scale your product development effort. That being said, I think of any "framework" as a set of rules, practices, ...


7

This is a pretty big question that might create a lot of advice, but I'm sure there are also nuances that we will not get here. There are also multiple questions and challenges embedded into your question so I'm going to answer generally. You are right that grouping by areas of expertise is considered a bad idea as now no one group of people actually has ...


6

In Scrum, there is no definition or ideology of scaling nor syncing Scrum teams - as long as they are all drawing from the same Product Backlog and adhering to the Definition of Done that was set it is irrelevant when they start/finish. So the answer would be FALSE, as is your thinking. I would recommend reading the Scrum Guide a few times and slamming out ...


3

Your Project is Iterative [I]n the end my client said these details are partial. More details will be sent after 5 or 10 days. You've just described the core use case for iterative development. You had what you thought was a complete scope or set of requirements, but the requirements and deliverables will now change. Scope creep can sometimes be laid ...


3

Portfolio Kanban boards apply to multiple contexts. Here are 3 specific examples - You could use it in a product development context to track high-level Portfolio Themes or Epics, under which you can have user stories on an "execution board". In a corporate IT or business environment, you can use a Portfolio Kanban board to track "Strategic Objectives" ...


3

I think that multiple teams should start at the same date. But do they really have to? Yes and no. You're trying to parse a poor-quality question, and exam practice questions are (by definition) not questions taken directly from the exams. Furthermore, just because a question is in an exam doesn't mean it's got real-world significance. If you consider a ...


2

Q: Why use one rather than the other? Its important to first understand why different frameworks exist to scale scrum or agile teams. In my view, the answer is money. After the agile manifesto's publication in early 2000s and its subsequent fame, Scrum soon became the "market leader" in the world of agile. Scrum did not, theoritically at least, address how ...


2

Customer relations typically includes everything needed to maintain relationships with existing customers and reach new customers. It tends to be focused on communication - answering questions, resolving issues or complaints, and similar types of work. It may includes sales and marketing, as well as social media and others. The exact definition varies by ...


2

To understand the how bit you will need to study each individually. The good news is that all will talk about basically the same thing but with different terminologies. If you are familiar with Scrum, then understanding the how of any of the 3 should be fairly straightforward. In case of Nexus, which is my favourite, you basically add additional events ...


2

Synchronising sprints is neither required nor is it necessary. Typically the reasons given for synchronising sprints are: The teams only integrate their code at the end of sprints Testing in Scrum teams is constrained to work done by the Scrum team The Product Owner does not have sufficient time to attend multiple meetings The approach to source code ...


2

TL;DR Don't create a false dichotomy by confusing the organizational choice of how to structure teams with the mechanism for scaling the Scrum framework up within the enterprise. The team structure you choose will impact your level of integration effort, but does not ultimately affect the scaling mechanism itself. Regardless of how you form your teams, ...


1

The first place I would start is with a value stream analysis (or going old school PMP, a critical path analysis). Start at the beginning of your process and start mapping out each high level task, Determine what the inputs (dependencies) and outputs are for each step. Record the cycle time for each step (how long does it take to perform). Once you've got ...


1

Scaling a company is not easy. I think you can't give an answer that fits every situation and every kind of company. Looking from the outside, I would think in: Identifing the problems you need to solve. Changing your production process to reach the solutions. I would suggest some initial reading on both subjects: "Getting Real. The smarter, faster, ...


1

Lots of facts that need to be brainstormed. I will focus on the bullet points to hopefully give you enough to think about. In some way it feels like I had the same issues a several years ago. Workload is not even across all resources of the team: Try to figure out the root cause of it. My problem was that the each individual was the owner of a specific area ...


1

Erin has some great general answers. I'd like to add a couple specific suggestions based on the set of projects I've been running. The situation is similar to yours in many ways(needing to use a set of people to handle ongoing maintenance, small change request, and new development... and needing to bring new members on from time to time). The usefulness of ...


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