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1

I have read this question several times and if I understand your question correctly, I don't think you fully understand the concept of Scrum, and how it's embedded in the organization. Let's start with what "IT requests SW update" means - do you mean workstations? (operating system, software) or software for servers, virtual machines? If so, ...


2

It's not entirely clear to me who "IT" is or how the Scrum Team fits into the broader context. However, there should be sufficient information to provide an answer to the question based exclusively on the rules of Scrum. The Product Owner would be accountable, but not necessarily responsible for this work. The person playing the role of the Product ...


1

I am supporting Mike's answer to utilize PO's advantages from both sides. To be more specific, PO from your org should be the real single PO to make final decisions, maximize product value. On the vendor side, we can have a proxy PO (or in my context can be called as Business Analyst) who works more closely with Development team to clarify requirements and ...


2

In the one governmental scrum project I worked in, the government agency used an external IT consultant as Product Owner. This ensures that the product owner has no split loyalties while having the necessary expertise. On the negative side, the product owner needs significant ramp up time to understand the requirements, and the possibility of disagreement ...


3

I am in the same situation, I am a PO on the client-side. To me, that is the only option because most times the contractors are after their selfish interest. The PO has to defend the customer and business objectives in delivering business value. The PO needs to be able to make strategic decisions in view of the overarching business strategy. The contractors ...


3

Client side. The PO needs to be able to identify the business priorities, provide subject-matter expertise and justify his or her decisions to the client organisation. Most software probably requires organisational or procedural changes at the client so it's also an advantage if the PO is in a position to make such changes happen. Finally, it's to both ...


2

Actually, there's another strategy: "cooperating de facto 'product owners' on both sides!" On the customer side, this person is tasked with directly representing the business interests of the company as they relate to this software. This person can most easily put himself or herself into the "proxy position" of representing the actual ...


14

And I'm going to take the middle ground between Bogdan and Thomas... Whichever side has the more competent PO. Bogdan already listed the responsibilities of a PO. To (over)simplify it in a single sentence, however, it would be: The purpose of the PO is to act as a link between the customers and the Development Team. As such, the PO is really the only role ...


7

I'm going to disagree totally with Bogdan's answer. I believe that, in most cases, it's better for the developing organization to supply the Product Owner. There may be cases where it does work out, but I'm hesitant. The first thing to consider is why you are contracting with a software company instead of building the software yourself, internally. It's most ...


14

There is no canonical answer to this question, although as a rule of thumb, it would be better for the PO to be from the client side, not the contractor side. The Scrum Guide says this about the PO role: The Product Owner is the sole person responsible for managing the Product Backlog. Product Backlog management includes: Clearly expressing Product Backlog ...


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