34

Speaking from experience... I once attempted to bring Scrum into a situation where: We currently had little-to-no defined process for development - people just got assigned work, did it, then got more work. Our direct manager was indifferent/mildly hostile (think "I don't like this new-fangled way of doing things, but I'll let you work how you want. Just ...


23

Many traditional managers are accustomed to "knowing" Scope, Budget and Deadline upon committing to a project. Scrum takes all that away and promises to do its best. Now you get one of these outcomes: Management says: In that case you are not doing Scrum. Outcome: No Scrum. Management says: Sure you do Scrum, we do waterfall and what we do counts. Outcome: ...


14

There's a huge misconception (or difference of perception) of managers of programming teams. What they think: "We set the project, features and timeline, and it will be done in that time" What programmers think: "We have a certain pace that we can work at, work will not get done any faster regardless of what management is doing. In waterfall management sets ...


9

Scrum can deliver software faster, better, and cheaper. But to realize the potential time and cost savings, stakeholders have to understand the process and be committed to fulfilling their role in it. Understanding the process means letting go of the idea that everything can be planned up front. Business people are accustomed to having detailed plans and ...


4

The project sponsor: Authorizes charging men/money/minutes/material to the project; if you don't have a sponsor, then you should not be working on the project. Who made the decision to work on this project? That person is a good candidate to be project sponsor. Clears political obstacles. If your database runs into a conflict with another project or ...


4

The PMI Body of Knowledge (PMBoK) is the US Standard for project management and organization. It also has the benefit of being the basis for the Project Management Professional certification. As a quick starting point, I'd suggest going to Wikipedia and looking up "Project Management" and "Program Management"


4

To add to existing answers, using my girlfriend's experience of her current place of work... Agile development hinges on sprints. A key feature of a sprint is that you decide at the start of it what you'll be delivering, and that's all you deliver. The delivery date and the deliverable content are locked down at the start, everyone knows what they are, ...


3

In most traditional project management mindsets, people are more concerned with their budgets and schedules for a project than turning out a usable product. They want to know what something is going to cost, how long it will take, and what they will get for their investment, all before any actual work gets done. It also assumes that the people asking for ...


3

It sounds like your company understands the need for project and operations excellence as it relates to what they manufacture but seems to have a blind spot for other non-core projects. As we all know, change occurs with the right sponsor. You were silent as to who politely ignored you but, if there are higher ranking people above, you need to talk with ...


3

According to Cambridge dictionary "buy into" is a phrasal verb meaning "to believe in a set of ideas". It often happens that when a company or a team migrates the processes to scrum the overall performance or results might not look good especially in the very beginning. This declaration means that the management should believe in scrum and be ready to wait ...


2

David Espina's answer covers most of what I wanted to say. I just wanted to add: Keep a paper trail. You not that you're afraid that the project's failure will ham you. So, whenever you bring these concerns to someone, document it. When asked 'why did you fail your project?', the following: "On Oct 5th, 2017, I went to John Doe and informed him that if ...


2

Try using the Sandwich Method: Good News – Bad News – Good News Start saying something like, "We have a promising opportunity, engulfed along with a little unfortunate situation. But holistically the situation still looks under control due to some quick mitigation recommended by the project team."


2

Answer "Management has to buy into Scrum." Can you tell me why that is? Doing (real) Scrum means that management is giving up a lot of control. Managements needs to know that, accept that, and really live that spirit. This is very, very hard, especially as experienced project managers tend to be more of a aggressive/controlling character, and ...


2

Scrum is designed to operate as "self-organizing teams". For many conventional managers who assign work to employees, this is a colossal change. This requires the management to trust the team to select their own work, and to get it done without the help of the manager. The new role of a manager in a Scrum based environment is that of a leader, making sure ...


2

Scrum or agility is about reverse accountability when it comes to management. A traditional manager tells what, how, when. The team is accountable. If it fails, it's the team's fault. A modern manager tells why and what, then supports its team in whatever way possible. The manager is accountable. If it fails, it's his fault. When introducing Scrum (or ...


1

It is very much similar to the fact that the Project Sponsor/Executive should be part of the 'plan how to plan' workshop at the beginning of the project. In essence, you have to set up their expectations and they have to agree on the deliverables and project approach. Agile is a very different mindset than waterfall. It is not easy to translate an Agile ...


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