14

If you are following Scrum as defined in the Scrum Guide, the Product Owner cannot simply add stories to the Sprint Backlog. The Sprint Backlog, which is created as Sprint Planning as a negotiation between the Product Owner and Development Team while considering past performance and forecast capacity, is owned exclusively by the Development Team. If work ...


9

One thing needs to be clarified here; the PM's role is NOT to develop any code. One role is the programmer, developer, etc... so I would hire people with technical skills required to do that role, and another different role is the Project Manager's. For this role, I would hire the person with the strongest capabilities to lead the project (if he or she has ...


9

My mneumonic is that Quality Assurance is a Process (spot the double 's' in each). Quality control is testing. If you search on QA vs QC you'll get a number of sites; I happen to find these rather clear: Quality assurance is about engineering “processes“that assure quality. Now let’s try to understand it better! Infostretch Quality Assurance is ...


9

Try to quantify (read: put a hard $ amount to) the increased time/expenses that build up over the lifecycle of the project - regression testing, bug-fixing, new feature risk and increased time to integrate, etc. Edit: and of course share this with the clients. :)


9

A few suggestions: Don't delegate & disappear until the deadline. Check in with them once or twice, just informally to ask how it's going, do they need any clarification from you, are they having any problems. Be sure everyone is clear on what the priority of the delegated task is, especially if the people you've delegated to have other usual tasks, ...


8

I am not deep into code testing but, from a QC perspective, having the same person check his/her own work is like having a prisoner keeping the key to his cell. The QC objective is to find defects. The more defects found, the better the QC capability. That objective is inconsistent with the objective of the developer/builder, who is being measured by ...


8

I am a fresh project manager, who grew up from developer. I noticed in my company, that knowledge of technical issues really helps me manage complex technical projects. It allows me to better understand developers , and when dealing with a client I can understand a lot more technical and business issues. I noticed that pm's in my company, who don't have ...


7

I'd hire the person who is smart and can demonstrate that they can get things done. If he happens to have the IT background, wonderful.


7

TL;DR Make unit testing part of your core development methodology, and ensure that test coverage is part of your "Definition of Done." Also, ensure your estimates include the overhead to develop and refactor your unit tests. How to "Bake In" Unit Testing How can I make unit testing a priority? Unit tests can function as both design tools and quality ...


6

PMs don't need to be very familiar with the IT environment to be successful. It helps but its not critical since most of the work he will be doing won't be of a technical nature anyway. IMHO, You have more problems with those clueless ones that THINK they know IT. The key thing about dealing with non technical PMs is to have a strong technical team leader ...


6

I would like to start from their name. Quality assurance - it's a support of an application/project, which assumes that every quality requirements will be checked at the end of the project. The assurance may include the whole procedure, the logistic of the testing and fixing every bug and problem. It can be also preventing a problem and implementing quality ...


6

Given the example you gave, no quality management methodology can be applied. Indeed, quality management is all about continuously improving the output quality (not only, but as an abstract overview, it is sufficient). This definition would itself need to be more properly defined regarding against which metric improvement would be measured, what is the ...


6

The Project Management Perspective Should the same person to do the testing that did the development, or should another team member to do the testing? There is no canonical answer for this from a project management perspective because it's a false dichotomy. Quality assurance (QA) or user acceptance testing (UAT) often have different objectives and ...


6

It sounds like they are getting too deep into the technical weeds here. Definition of Done is a checklist, not a functional specification. Also, a DoD does not have to be a "All or Nothing". It is perfectly acceptable to have conditional statements (If story is UI related, then X). Here is an example of a DoD pulled from a team I work with. Story design ...


6

Let's divide QA(Quality Assurance) from QC(Quality control), check the difference. Short term solution for manual QC would be to create test plans, acceptance criteria's, force your QC to add test evidence(Screenshots, screencasts, logs, SQL query results), which prove that all ok, you should also plan the number of bugs based on previous development ...


5

Just to add more words to help clarify: QA is proactive--creating the capability to reduce the defects in development. QC is retroactive--finding the defects already created to fix. Think of QA as risk mitigation while QC is risk contingency. I differ in meszar's answer only in that QC is NOT part of QA, in my view. Two different capabilities, ...


5

TL; DR WIFO is really more about risk management than it is about quality management. Depending on your risk model, WIFO may or may not be a good choice. Define "Worst" The first thing you need to do is define "worst" for your use case. Worst doesn't inherently mean something with a high defect or failure rate (although it may); it could also be a measure ...


5

Don't ask, don't tell ;) I guess you're not giving estimates on how much time you spend thinking, and how much writing code, the same principle should apply to unit testing. As soon as your Unit Testing activity becomes a line in the budget it becomes negotiable. I never report unit testing as a separate activity (and in principle most of the time you ...


5

If I don't have the time to produce a Swiss precision watch, ... If I don't have the tools to produce a Swiss precision watch, ... If I cannot attract the people that can produce a Swiss precision watch,... ... I might end up offering sun dials. Likewise, my customer might not have the time to actually figure out the difference between a sundial and a ...


5

TL;DR While quality can be measured objectively, defining the domain-specific elements of quality for your organization isn’t something where you can rely on a standard dictionary definition. In fact, most of the issues you’ve identified aren’t intriniscally quality issues at all. They seem more like organizational issues. We’ll look at some of them in ...


4

It sounds like you're using "Worst" as a proxy for "Most Valuable". One thing that's nice about agile methods is that they tend to order work according to value-to-client, not according to imposing a total project execution order to minimise costs. So you do the most important things first, then the next most important, and so on until there's nothing more ...


4

set up Continuous Integration and (as you noted) automated unit and integration tests get the team agree on a common Definition of Done, including that no feature is completed until it is integrated back into the whole system and is proven to work there get better Django developers by one or more of arranging training for your existing developers, hiring ...


4

Don't add them as an extra and don't allow them to be negotiated away. Make them part of your budget and schedule and make it clear that this is how you develop. If you would normally say 'task x will take 2 days plus 1 day of testing' then it gives someone the opportunity to say 'well, do it in 2 and don't worry about the testing'. If you say 'task x will ...


4

I agree with @CodeGnome but not just with Agile. No matter the method, the product, or even the domain, UAT needs to belong to the users, in scope, conduct, and outcome. The client side needs to define how to conduct UAT, the scenarios it will run, procedures, training people, how to document findings, any criteria needed, etc. After all, UAT is a client ...


4

So right now, as an Engineer, I take a single task, mull over it for 4 weeks, make sure it contains no bugs at all and I am the best worker you ever had. Despite the fact that it took me 4 weeks to deliver such a simple task. On the other hand, you have QA, who is wildly dependent on getting a crappy Engineer assigned. The crappier the engineer, the more ...


3

I'd like to point out a major risk that lies behind your question. Let's call it good-bad dualism. Your question includes terms like "always", "worst", "most negative", etc. Unfortunately a project is not just a single variable that we can sort to set priorities. Most of your job as a project manager is to balance between several aspects of the project, ...


3

Yes I have reused Product Descriptions. The key point is that the reuse of anything from one project to the next requires you to review and tailor what has gone before to suit your needs today. At a high enough level these will tend to be identical from one project to the next (e.g. documentation to support vendor selection, documentation to support project ...


3

If the same person does the development and test, the feedback loop of doing things right is short (verification). The test driven development method builds on this idea. On the other hand, it is good to have another view on the problem just to know if the right thing is built (validation), and that's the case when somebody else tests the developers' code. ...


3

A standard approach to conduct audits will quickly turn into a useless control that everyone will be scared to stop using but no one will use the data from it. If I were you, I'd develop my audit approach consistent with the goal I am after as well as the project and its unique set of issues and risks. I can see a checklist to sort of bang any project ...


3

To answer the headline question: Absolutely. If the person has the right skills, I would take him or her on regardless of programming background or not. You imply that an IT environment equals a programming environment. That's an interesting side issue: I work in an IT environment and always have. In my current role I work alongside about a dozen other ...


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