21

When taking over a troubled project, one of the very first things you need to do is to slow or stop the train. If you let it continue to move, you will most likely continue on the same path and unable to introduce any meaningful intervention. You need to get the sponsor at the table to redefine the project as if it is a new project. This means the ...


8

I agree with CodeGnome's well-founded comments about change control procedures. However the scenario you described and your question could occur regardless of how effective your change control procedures are. For now let's assume you have good controls in place but are still concerned about "how do you handle people who obviously try to add and change scope ...


8

After I have received some of them, I have found out that the sponsor wants more than what we have been programming for. How do I handle a situation like this? Part of what you need to do is triage the project: what can be finished, what can be finished only by scaling back and what cannot be finished in the time allowed (and needs to be dropped in "this ...


7

The Project Managers know there are other options that will work better. The implication behind this sentence is that the PMs know with absolute certainty the other options will work better. If my inference is right, I find that implication odd as I am not sure I have ever experienced a time when a complex problem had a solution that was guaranteed to ...


6

You don't need any of that; close your spreadsheets. You need a change management process which include a governing body. Scope changes via new requirements is the type of change that would go through this process. If approved, you get a new plan. You get to rebaseline. You get more money. You get more time. What you have now is scope creep. ...


5

I will bet you have more project management going on than what you are giving yourself credit for. The natural tendency of any group of individuals embarking on a task is to form a team, establish roles including leadership, establish rules, establish processes, and figure out solutions. Since this has grown from one week to six months, it shows that this ...


5

TL;DR I probably would have picked "C" as well, but can see what they were trying to get at with their selected answer. I don't agree with it, but I can see the point. It's an academic answer that probably aligns with something in the PMBOK, but that doesn't mean it's either a great question or a great answer. Ivory Tower Answers Most tests, and ...


5

These are two judgement labels applied to the exact same behavior, based on the outcome. If you get it right, the customer is delighted. If you get it wrong, you gold plated and the customer is upset. I think the concept of gold plating in project management, and the teachings around the concept of avoidance, is based on the thought that the risk of ...


4

Timing is Immaterial When you ask: How do you handle people who...change scope at the worst possible time in the project life cycle? you're missing the forest for the trees. It doesn't matter that the scope change comes at "the worst possible time." The issue is that your project should already have change controls in place to deal with scope issues and ...


4

Treat it as a change request. Assess the impact on scope, schedule, cost, quality, and conformance with mission needs. Find Key Performance indicators to discriminate between the options. Make sure that the stakeholders are aware. Then decide if the impact on the project is sufficient for you to walk away. Be careful; As @David Espina hints, their ...


4

I see two (or well, three, if getting a new job counts ;-) ) possible ways to deal with such situations in general: When you receive a refusal like above: ask for clarification or more explanation, open a discussion to understand the other party's view and to come to a common agreement based on facts instead of feelings. To avoid receiving refusals: make ...


4

One of the four values of agile is "Customer Collaboration over Contract Negotiation." The first thing to ask is "what is best for the customer?". Once you've done that, then you ask "is it covered by the contract?" and only then do you delve into the "do we ask for more $". Specifically focusing on your issue the first question I'd ask is who was ...


4

I've been dealing a lot with a scope creep over the last 2 years. I created a list of things that is a must to keep in mind in order to minimize the negative impact on the project. At first - you should realize that scope creep will happen! You should: know the requirements; know the client's expectations; have balls to say "No". Saying "Yes" to placate ...


4

Let's pretend you had a physical card wall for a moment. You've got some cards that someone thought was a good idea, but on further review, they're not actually so great. What would you do with the cards? Would you create an separate section on your wall for these worthless ideas or would you chuck them in the nearest waste-bin? Yeah, you'd toss 'em, so ...


4

The accountability resides always with the project manager, the responsibility can be delegated. If you look at page 25 of PMBOK v 6, table 1.4 Process 5.2 Collect Requirements is specified as a PM accountability.


4

It’s All About Expectations “Unapproved” doesn’t really capture the essence of scope creep. In purely pragmatic terms, scope creep is a slow or gradual increase in scope beyond the original plan. A scope gap (which is not really a very common term, in my personal business experience) is just the shortfall between stakeholder expectations of included scope ...


3

There is a reason they call it the "iron triangle". Like another said, it often rights itself, but if all corners are fixed then quality or lack there off is often what is sacrificed. You get to choose one, in reality. If you are fixing cost/resources by having one dev, then that leaves you time or scope. If you have a deadline, then that leaves scope. ...


3

A simple burn down chart might do the trick. We'll side step estimating and the value of it right now, that's a longer term thing that will help in the long run. Instead we'll go with fixed time as it sounds like you have a really solid grasp of the work you have to do. Step 1: Determine the number of workable hours remaining in your project. This is ...


3

I have formulated and defined the following view over many years and now use it quite successfully when I am at an interview seeking a role, and of course in real life when managing projects. Successful delivery (Waterfall method) comprises the following key elements to the Five-point Plan (MarvTM) Know your requirements in clear, accurate and unambiguous ...


3

There's no way the project will be done on time nor to the sponsor's expectations. Make that clear to the sponsor and start from scratch. Instead of focusing on completing this project, focus on creating a new project. Prioritize what the sponsor wants and start delivering.


3

This is clearly a case of scope-creep. However, you can handle this the same way you handle any project chartering exercise. Specifically, I would do the following: Determine the project sponsor. Get the sponsor and project stakeholders to sign off on a new charter that takes into account the current scope as it stands today, and limits future scope. Make ...


3

You need to break it down into several sub-discussions, each with a different goal. Then try to keep everyone to the one topic. A couple of suggestions - First, it sounds like your unit manages change for other units? Then the first step is to identify the relevant stakeholders, and get their input - what do they want, how do they define success, what ...


3

At our firm we have a few ways of tracking out-of-scope tickets, all of which have proved useful for different Product Owners depending on their style. Issue Type: In addition to JIRA's normal "User Story" issue type, we've created a separate type ("Iterative User Story," but you can call it whatever you want) that indicates an issue is outside of the scope ...


3

An easy solution would be to load the values in excel of your planned work, and then load the values of your actuals, and you can display progress using a cumulative graph. Here's an example: I used 155 as your planning value and loaded it assuming equal numbers each week, which produced a flat loaded schedule. Then I made up actual values but showed it ...


2

What has happened to make you say that the project should have a project manager now? First I would find out why the project needs a manager and act accordingly. Is it hard to coordinate the work between the colleagues? Is it hard to communicate with the customer or with the other teams? Do you need somebody who understands economics? Anyway I've seen two ...


2

I would stop the project until, 1- Letting know the situation to related people/managers inhouse since they should be aware of the situation clearly (if they are not yet) 2- Clarifying what the sponsor required 3- Clarifying what has been done so far. As you involved in the project for the last 18 months, it may be easier for you to sort out what’s ...


2

Since this is a software-related project there are several books available like the the ones referenced by @Tangurena and I recommend Business @ the Speed of Stupid by Dan Burke and Alan Morrison, too. Before making any major changes or having a heart-to-heart with management, I would do the following prep work: Update Current Status: Talk to the team and ...


2

Crashing can be successful. I've done it. But most people make several mistakes: They UnderCrash usually crashing takes 3 to 5 times as much cost to successfully overcome the problems caused by the inertia of brooks law. Most people severely under calculate the amount of resource required to crash a project. A project that is 25% complete at the halfway ...


2

The triangle balances naturally. You can independently fix or manipulate one or two of the sides, but the third is dependent and will adjust to balance. But this is not your problem. Estimating is not your problem, either. You can estimate all day using all the tried and true leading estimating practices and it will not touch your dilemma. There is a ...


2

Generally a Project Manager is not the only person involved in estimation. They may involve some technical members who have experience of executing or who may be actually working on those projects. The Project Manager may need some help with estimations and work-breakdown which is normal. However, after it has been done and before it is sent to the client, ...


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