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7

When “taking it to the team” should we seek consensus? The simple answer is "yes". When people all agree on a decision or an action, they will stand behind that decision or will make efforts to realize that action. The more detailed answer would be that it's not that simple. Sometimes people all agree on something, in which case you have the best outcome ...


5

First of: thanks for the link to the vanity metrics blog. It was an interesting read. Second point summary: monetize the costs Second: I dealt with the same issue at my previous company. I created the report because I was asked to do it. After the first time I asked why I was creating it because it took some time to create (I could spend 3 to 4 hours ...


4

welcome! The examples you give are "how" rather than "what". User stories are explicitly about the "what" and the "why" without specifying the "how". So: Why do you want to "modify column in table"? As a user, I want the Username field to have more length so I can enter my entire long hyphenated name in it. As a sysadmin, I want to make the Foo column ...


4

When we as Agile Coaches and Scrum Masters servant lead teams and help them make decisions, do we need to seek consensus? Yes... and remember that consensus is not the same as unanimity. This is a pretty good article on various approaches to obtaining consensus. I like the Fists of Five technique myself (slightly different from what's in the article)**, ...


4

We shouldn't call anything a Sprint unless the team is delivering a Done, useable, and potentially releasable product Increment. From my point of view it is a matter of naming, because the reality (at least from my experience) is that this initial stage is a common process in our organizations. The problem with naming is probably setting wrong precedents or ...


4

Concerning the timeboxes, they are all maximums. If you can accomplish the purpose of the event in less time, there's no reason to remain in it for longer. Your events - all of them - can be shorter than the timebox. The one thing to watch out for is rushing through events and missing the purposes and benefits. Specifically about the Sprint Planning and ...


3

I initially didn't want to answer this question since the comments do a proper job of capturing the gist of it (i.e. discuss it with your SM/colleagues), but since I don't like neither of the currently existing answers, I'm just going to throw a wrench into the works here. One of the answers basically says "How does the Scrum Master dare to do this", while ...


3

The backlog is not something that you create and then is static. The backlog changes - items are added, removed, and reordered - throughout the effort. Unless there is some legal or contractual reason not to, there's nothing to prevent starting the creation and refinement of the backlog before any kind of formal contracts that may be necessary are in place. ...


3

This is not Scrum. Scrum has a definition in the Scrum Guide. This is a living document - it's reviewed, maintained, and updated based on feedback from people using it and experiences. This is "real Scrum". Now, what the Scrum Guide provides is a framework. There are a couple of rules. You can add things to Scrum. In fact, you almost have to add things to ...


2

A lot of comments are made about the size of the team and the roles within it, so I'll skip that. My advice (with most questions, issues or whatever): Take it to the team The team is doing the actual work and they can tell what they think they need or should do or whatever. Then you can have a discussion about the situation and come to a solution with the ...


2

The preference is that a decision is unanimous. If a unanimous decision is not possible then we may need to consider alternatives. If no alternatives are appropriate then may make the decision by a majority vote. If the decision is by a majority vote it is important that the people voting against accept the outcome. To achieve this we will need: A team ...


2

I think you have two issues and the first issue I am drawing the inference just based on what you wrote so I could be very wrong, but I'll take the leap. A high performing team ideally would have a sense of team goals, objectives, a way of driving consensus, and mutual concern of its members among other attributes. I think your first issue is that your ...


2

I would keep everything in the same project since you are working on a single web app. You can create multiple boards in Jira (one for reach team) and manage each teams workload through these boards. Speak to your Jira Administrator to design the project. The product architecture sounds like it is layered (front-end, product micro-services, etc). Sounds ...


2

You can't calculate EV on the 10 items yet because they aren't done, so you don't know what the total effort to complete them is. You could calculate EV on the 5 that were completed if you had estimates for those 5 independent of the other 5.


1

The new Scrum master suddenly decided to copy the whole backlog to AzureDevops and ask the devs to track their progress for those sub-tasks in AzureDevops and Jira will be used to track and keep only the User Story but not the subtasks. The Scrum Master has no right to make this decision. There is nothing in the Scrum Guide or in any other definition of ...


1

Either way, you're going to run into problems. Based on my experiences with Jira, each product should be a separate Jira project. That means your iOS application, your Android application, and your web application are all separate Jira projects. I'm not sure what you mean by "backend", but if you are maintaining APIs that are shared among all of these ...


1

TL;DR In this scenario for calculating Effort variance, should I consider only effort spent in completing 5 user stories or should I consider the effort spent for all the 10 user stories? You should use only the stories completed. You can't meaningfully measure deltas on effort expended on work you haven't completed. It's worth your while to identify ...


1

As any work that you perform before the contract is finalized may be lost, you should constrain yourself to only those work items that are necessary to secure the contract. If building an initial backlog helps to create a better estimate and to convince the customer that you're qualified to execute the contract, it might be fine. Otherwise, it's just ...


1

I'd suggest that the best answer is no. Creating and refining items on the backlog is part of business-as-usual - part of the ongoing collaboration between you and the client. Presumably that collaboration starts when the contract starts. Creating the team would have to come first and then the team can have its initial Sprint Planning meeting. Creating a ...


1

Generally agree with Daniel's answer above, but wanted to expand on his point about team formation: after the project is done the team will be disbanded Good grief, why would anyone do this?? Team dynamics are critical to team-based work, and it takes time for a new team to work through forming/storming/norming to get to performing. I've heard ...


1

I've worked with quite a few organizations that use Scrum like this and I've coached some of those teams, however, none call it "Project-based Scrum". I would highly recommend that you look at the Scrum Guide. It is fairly short and will tell you what is and isn't Scrum. While you will probably get a lot of the benefits, there are a couple challenges you ...


1

It is the responsibility of the Scrum Master to make sure the team is following Scrum, but adding a tester to the team does not conflict with the Scrum Guide. However, the Scrum Guide does recommend keeping the team size to 9 or fewer, so it would be worth discussing that with the team. A good approach would be to keep an eye out for issues related to team ...


1

Perhaps it will be helpful to reframe the question. We can ask instead, "Does my team have the skills around quality necessary to deliver the product increment?" You may think you know the answer to this question - you may even be right. However, this is a question for the team. The Scrum Guide has this to say about the development team: They are self-...


1

As a Scrum Master should I decide or the team decide whether they need a tester? This is how traditional project managers talk, not scrum masters. If your team members consider a tester would help and they want a tester, then they should have a tester. The team decides. This directly answers your title question. I'll now say a few things about what you ...


1

Practice swarming Here is a link where Jeff Sutherland, one of the co-founders of Scrum, explain the why and what of swarming. Even though he is prescribing this as a way to improve productivity, I think it will also help to minimize the risk of a "failing sprint". In a typical Scrum team, developers are assigned specific stories to work on. So, when the ...


1

welcome! You're asking a general question with a specific example. I'll try to respond to both. I see several relevant points here: General: you are a scrum master you are new to the org Specific: you think this report is a waste of time the consumers of this report are...? (whether it's the team or the stakeholders might affect how you proceed) The ...


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