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7

Short introduction + practice run I would write a short presentation about what Story Points are and how they are used (a summary of this explanation should work nicely; the dogs example is really intuitive). I would also mention some pitfalls or common mistakes just to get some of them out of the way, since people will have a few questions. Trying to ...


4

How I do it: I set up a grid. Across the top I have a size scale. I actually don't use numbers at first. Rather, I use ice cream: taster cup, single scoop, double scoop, sundae, banana split, bucket. I'll come back to why later. On the left side, I have a list of things. Usually I use household chores and tasks, but you could even use real backlog items. I ...


4

For the first point of your question, the answer is to not have the two activities (dev and QA) done sequentially. That's not Agile; that's one small Waterfall of duration equal to that of the sprint. This has already been discussed, so I won't go into more details. Please see What does a QA team do during the development phase of a sprint in Agile Scrum? ...


4

So, if I understand your question correctly, you are asking if story points are still meaningful if only a few developers (not all) estimate those story points for the work that you need to do in the sprint? Planning poker is a consensus based technique for estimating. The idea is that when all the people doing the work discuss and estimate a task, the ...


3

If you have teams that work on one project only, then you could keep them on Scrum iterations. If they can plan things out and do the work without depending too much on external resources (I'm thinking "you" here), then great, let them do so. From what I gather from your question, it seems that this is not the main issue, but the fact that you are ...


3

Like most things, it depends. In theory, you could forecast when work is likely to be done. If you understand your team's average velocity (whether it's in story points per Sprint, ideal hours per Sprint, backlog items per Sprint), you can forecast when you will get to a particular item on the backlog. However, there are a lot of caveats with this. It ...


3

TL;DR In most agile frameworks, you measure success or failure based on measurable outcomes, not utilization rates or external process governance. In fact, measuring anything other than objective outcomes will be counter-productive. If you find yourself asking whether a Scrum Team is working "hard enough" for the money you're spending, you're ...


3

Iterative delivery. If each sprint the customer is testing and potentially releasing a working increment of functionality then they have regular evidence of the quality of product, they can feedback on any problems and they can prioritise future work as needed. Also the customer has the option to walk away if they choose and keep what was already delivered. ...


2

Todd A. Jacobs gave a good example of how to handle this within a Scrum context, but this isn't entirely a question about Scrum. The broader question is if you can trust the vendor or not, no matter if they are using Scrum or something else. Trust + time + inspection I'll formulate my answer by using an analogy. Let's say you go visit some third world ...


2

The tool you want is a burnup chart. JIRA has them built in as Release Burnup Chart or Release Forecast Chart (they keep changing the name), but the feature in JIRA is limited that it only forecasts the whole release. However, you can build these charts by hand - they may seem difficult at first, but they're very fast and very easy once you get the hang of ...


1

Are timelines non-agile/-SCRUM or should a timeline be always possible for tasks that are months in the future. You can always do a long(er) term release planning no matter if you use Scrum or anything else. You basically look at the features you want done, estimate each and every one of them, then knowing the team's velocity and the length of a sprint in ...


1

This is one of the conceptual problems of Scrum which can't really be overcome. No matter how people are trying to sell the idea of Testing intertwining with the Development - Testing will always fall behind. You can work on shortening this lag (which is a very good thing by the way), but you can't eliminate it completely. So you have choices like these: ...


1

Should I ask the manager to alternate and work only on two products instead of 4 during a sprint or a release? Yes, is the short answer. Handling many products at the same time, as a shared resource, is always going to be tricky, regardless of what way of working you apply (e.g. in this case, Scrum). It sounds like some better visualisation of the large ...


1

"Build then Measure then Learn" - It sounds to me like Lean. Not Scrum and UX. "Plan then Do then Check then Review" - Is it not PDCA with a tweak? The 'act' is replaced with 'review' to give it a scrumish feeling, but it is not Scrum and not UX. "Discovery then Sprint Delivery then Sprint" - Whatever it is, has nothing to do ...


1

It sounds like you are trying to collect anonymous responses so people can tell you how they are feeling without having to feel dumb, attacked, or like something bad might happen; is this correct? If so, there are several options. A website can do this, if you already use Microsoft 365 then that platform can do such a thing as well. At the basic level, you ...


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