10

I am wondering what you mean by practical. There is no easy way out of estimating and there is no way of estimating that will yield 100% accuracy 100% of the time (in fact, it'll yield 100% accuracy about 0.00003% of the time). It is an iterative process using ALL available resources and methods that pretty much point to a general area of where you should ...


8

The issue is not just that documentation was poor, rather that some of your planning deliverables were either not done or not implemented. Documentation in and of itself won't help you. That being said, documentation provides evidence that your team has thought through what you need to do and has developed a reasonable, feasible and achievable plan. The key ...


7

First thing, you need a business case. The project must either solve an existing problem, or be something that can create revenue. "This will be really cool!" is not generally considered a business case, but if you work at a place where it is, all the better. You also need to get a sponsor. Someone in the company that can see the value that this ...


6

Is it worth to apply any of the project management techniques? Whether a one-person team or more, applying project management principles will always help because it provides a way to measure project status and visibility into the actual progress. However the level of processes application may vary, that is, various PM processes can be carried out with less ...


5

"The project management techniques we read in books [sic] are best suited for bigger projects." I think you made an erroneous conclusion here. The PM techniques are size and industry agnostic. What you seem to be missing is the tailoring of these techniques to fit the project and the environment in which you are working. What might change with size is ...


5

If its for a pitch, do not forget contingency. In the real world first hit estimates often carry 50-100% contingency. As you do more work, you will see things come up more often and you will have something close to base it on. Until then, as said, break it into small tasks, work out dependency and any delays that are set in stone (such as waiting for a ...


5

Notwithstanding how you were supposed to get paid by the client, you need to have the best interests of your client in mind. This means you need to inform your client of your inability to resolve the issue and make a recommendation to your client to either find another solution provider or to abandon the solution because maybe there might not be an ...


5

One project, multiple epics I don't really see how 25+ epics will be more chaotic than 25+ projects. Don't overthink things. Redeveloping a monolith application into a micro-services architecture will be challenging enough for your team, they shouldn't also be forced to analyze things from an organizational point of view to see where each task goes where. ...


4

Start breaking the project into sub tasks. Break up to a level, where no sub task is of more than 4 hours. In the beginning of the project you may find this a daunting task. As your understanding about project will grow with time, the best thing will be to revise your older estimates.


4

In addition to the above: learn from your past estimates. I think this is the most efficient method for developing the skill. Make it as simple as possible, that is: use a simple table with four columns: Task name Estimate (before doing the task) Work effort (after doing the task) Deviation (in any form) I think you will need a few months to see that your ...


4

Some suggestions in no particular order: Figure out what your planning horizon is and schedule plan review meetings for when you anticipate that the plan will start to break down. Try to only estimate for simple tasks with clearly defined products deliverable by one person or functional unit. Where you have complex tasks decompose them until they are ...


4

I think Kanban may work best in your environment. And with some people being remote, you're almost forced to use an online Kanban board. I'll try to address the two issues you raise one by one. Global View You can maintain a Global View of the multiple projects by: Having all projects on the same board, and indicate with a color what project the task ...


4

You don't try to handle everything up front or predict the future. It's a waste of time and effort. As you build out the software and get stakeholder feedback, you will learn more about the true needs of the stakeholders. I'd recommend looking at the techniques of Agile Data and Agile Modeling. These two sets of practices can help you apply and integrate ...


3

I've found that "scrum" can mean very different things to different people. To me what differentiates it from other agile processes is the focus on commitment based sprints. Since you have not listed delivering sprint based deliverables as an important benefit for these projects you might get more value out of other lightweight agile processes rather that ...


3

Coming from a similar sized company within the software development industry, producing similar IT projects for clients ranging from 2-6 months builds I have a good understanding where you're coming from. It sounds like you have good processes in place for managing your projects, which includes documentation processes, however the problem that I'm hearing is ...


3

You are looking at this incorrectly. A document itself is only as valuable as the paper on which it is written. Like the risk log, for example, folks will typically labor over the log so it is almost museum quality and forget they are supposed to be navigating rough waters. Documentation is nothing more than 1) evidence that some type of planning took ...


3

Why don't you get them to plan out their educational careers? There is a huge amount of potential for them to: Articulate a vision of where they want to be in 5-10 years Develop a business case to justify spending Mum's $$ on their education Identify soft as well as hard benefits and costs Identify stakeholders that they need to engage (Mum, profs, future ...


3

When I signed up for the course "Project Management", honestly, I didn't expect too much. Thing is, I attended similar courses before and most of them were just boring. I mean, theory is nice and good, but you don't believe it until you get some hands on experience. People are like that and it's good, though sometimes annoying for the teachers ;) Anyways, ...


3

Aziz has a great answer, but I would not skip risk management just because it is a small project or you're on your own. When you have the What and the When cleared out, take some time to reflect upon the impedements that you will encounter along the way. This doesn't have to take much time (in fact, it is a continuous process) and it will probably help you ...


3

Even if you dont want to apply any of the Project management techniques, you will end up using a few of them. Decision regarding which technique to use largely depends on type of work you would be doing and team you would have. Also the schedule that you would follow would play important role. Regarding tools: I have seen people managing projects ...


3

All successful projects comply with a relatively short list of principles/themes: Does the project make sense from a business point of view? If no then the project should be terminated. Are team roles and responsibilities clearly defined? If no then confusion will ensue. Are plans in place that are feasible, achievable and realistic? If no then expect ...


3

Welcome to the community! As Vadim mentioned in his comment, your question is a little complex, so I'm going to try and break it down into bitesize chunks. We use it more as a todo list than a real project management system. First off, strictly speaking, Kanban is not a project management system or methodology. Kanban is a framework, or a set of ...


3

My background is similar, so I'll tell you my lessons learned. To get started, let people know you are interested in the PM role, and that you would like to work as a project admin or coordinator to get some experience. These are roles where you get to see a lot of the management activities but for the most part you don't have a lot of responsibility for ...


3

I'd start by moving to a physical task board. Tools can be great force multipliers. However if you start in a tool, you will often get influenced by the tool and end up doing process by tool. This is happening to my teams at AOL now and I've got teams experimenting with physical task boards for day to day and Jira just to document the work for official ...


3

Whether or not it is 'normal' is highly subjective and contextual. What is more important is whether or not it is a problem (which I assume it is, otherwise why are you here asking about it?), and, if so, how to fix it. The problem you have is that of clients asking for last-minute amendments. This can be broken down into two sub-problems: 1) The client is ...


3

The "Project Coordinator" Role Titles can and do vary widely in the industry and around the world, so you are unlikely to find a canonical answer. However, in the US industries I've worked in, the role you're describing is often termed a Project Coordinator. One source describes the role of Project Coordinator as follows: While the specific role of the ...


2

If you are serious about your second bullet ... Allow the follow operations on tasks: categorizing, activating/inactivating, prioritizing, estimating time needed and scheduling expected completion and required completion ..which I think includes MUSTs for me, regardless of one team to manage sanity of a large list of items, I would look to one of the ...


2

So i found a sollution after a while - Google Sites and they dont force you to have open source app. They allow to create posts as announcements - public, private, something between that have todo lists - public, private... discussion - linked Google Groups Dashboard like News page Dowload page Comments on pages or announcements plus many more feature as ...


2

One of the characteristics of a successful project is tailoring the project management methodology to the project's criticality and complexity. So don't ask "Do I have enough?", ask "Do I have what I need?". To figure out if you have what you need where you are the only team member, talk to the end customer(s)/user(s) and find out what is important to them....


2

I had a similar situation when I left a small start-up a couple of jobs ago. While I wanted to help them out as they transitioned my replacement, I also wanted to prevent them from overly relying on me. The solution I came up with was to set up a consulting contract with them. The key things included in this were: A reasonable hourly fee that didn't ...


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