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Agile Projects Generally Work Best When Billed as Time-and-Materials Do software developers operating under some sort of agile development cycle and presenting a series of 'deliverables' to their customer expect—or contract—their clients to make a stage payment per acceptable deliverable? In the world of contracting, anything the parties agree on (...


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In a buyer-seller relationship, the seller also has a say. If the terms are unreasonable, reject the contract and re-negotiate. If the seller agrees, then your only recourse is to do the best you can, mitigate what you can, monitor closely, and communicate early and often the high risk and how you are trending. A great PM is great not because they achieve ...


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One definition of project management is the art of managing cost, scope, and schedule. It is the project manager's job to raise the visibility of scope and schedule risks to senior management for action. If you aren't the project manager, raise your concerns with the person in that role. If you are the project manager and have failed to control the scope or ...


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Even If It's Not Trolling, It's a Recipe for Creating Disastrous Outcomes This is (at best) tangentially on topic as a project management question, and may possibly be trolling. Even assuming good intentions, it's hard to see how the prevailing literature and extant best practices don't answer your question. Assuming you are a project manager, and looking at ...


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TL;DR There's no single formula for determining how many tests a set of specifications will require. However, you can estimate level-of-effort and set quality targets based on your test plans, provided the people making the estimates are the ones who will be doing the actual work. The Testing Pyramid and Its Effects on the "Iron Triangle" There is no ...


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In my view, formal training has no place whatsoever in a project life cycle. None. Projects are, by definition, discrete pieces of work having a finite time period and finite resources. No project dollars should be invested in formal learning of any project team members. Informal learning occurs as a consequence of doing work. Training on the job of a ...


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You answered your own question: ". . . they plan, monitor, delegate, analyse risks, costs, time etc." According to PMBOK, the PM is also in charge of killing the project when it is non-viable (reality often falls short of that goal). Since you answered your own question, I have to infer that you don't understand the value such activities bring. The ...


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It's impossible. All agile methodologies should be iterative. Otherwise, they will not correspond to the first and third principles of the manifesto: Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable software. ... Deliver working software frequently, from a couple of weeks to a couple of ...


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Practically everything you've said is a cause for concern but the project should be salvageable. I suggest you concentrate on two things. Firstly, as Mark also suggested, it seems from your description that you don't have clear ownership of the project. Someone will need to set priorities and be accountable for costs and that isn't your job as PM. If it's a ...


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This type of micromanagement will chill motivation. There are a lot of studies and insight into that with a bit of research. So while you may "find" an issue if you did this type of inferior managing, you will exacerbate this supposed issue with others and slow progress. Building motivation--enabling purpose, AUTONOMY, and mastery, you will ...


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There is a term for such a thing, Wagile: Wagile software development is a group of software development methodologies that result from slipping from agile back into waterfall, doing a lot of short waterfalls and thinking it is agile, Waterfall model masquerading as Agile software development, etc. And it is as bad as it sounds... Found a nice ...


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Most non-trivial software development work tends to be billed as T&M. The agile approach with a T&M contract is attractive to both the customer and the vendor and generally has important advantages over payment on deliverables: Reduced risk. If a tested, working product is delivered continuously / incrementally then the amount of the work that is &...


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There are multiple project management frameworks out there and all define tasks and activities for the mentioned stages. So there can not be a right answer on your question. I'll reference the PMI framework. Have a look on this page PMBOK process table to get an idea of all the tasks related to the PM. During all project phases or stages, almost all tasks ...


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I would suggest using Eylean board. As it provides dynamic and playful interface with easy to get started and intuitive use. It can be used as a free stand alone version for personal and commercial use according to license. It packs all the modern features for project management based on lean and agile: task board, time tracking, team resources, reporting. ...


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Perhaps I could give more specific advice with more details, but it sounds like you're in a situation where you're already committed, but you know you won't deliver. Even when everything goes right, this can happen, so don't panic :). In most cases, that deadline comes from a business need of some sort. It is important to communicate with the client, ...


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The two answers and Mark's comment are spot on. It seems you have a good understanding of what you should do and you should follow your instincts here. That being said, the job of the PM is to get control of the chaos. It is the job. It is to bring the competing interests of various stakeholders and build a cogent interest package into which all ...


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The purpose of Sprints is not to deliver points, but rather to deliver value. The team doesn't commit to delivering a certain set of points or a set of Product Backlog Items. Instead, the team forecasts how much work they can accomplish as part of Sprint Planning. Throughout the Sprint, the team should be focusing on achieving the Sprint Goal, rather than ...


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For me, it wouldn't make any difference if you did all the testing, B did all the testing or if you shared the effort. Nor does it make a (big) difference if what you notice in production is a new problem, an incomplete fix or a regression. In all cases, you should follow the procedure for reporting and assessing a problem found in the production environment....


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If you working in Software company, being in a senior position and then if you are communicating with the client directly then its 100% sure that you will get tasks as well as deadlines that is because you are capable enough to do that tedious job which you might have shown him already ! Client will have that perception of finishing the task within the ...


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The issue of difficult/demanding clients is nothing new to the world of project management, nor is it limited to the world of software development. The skill needed here is the skill of negotiation. One of the many skills a PM needs is the skill of negotiation. The client is clearly feeling they are in a position of power (which they may or may not be) and ...


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For the choice of development process it does not really matter if there is a paying customer behind it or if it is an investment by upper management with the hope of being able to sell the product later. If there is no paying customer who came with a concrete set of wishes, there will be someone within the organization who has a strong vision for the ...


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To me this situation looks more of a Perspective of Done than what is shown/not-shown on screen. Thus the solution lies in effective communication. IMO, your aim should not be to show something new on UI in every demo, rather should be to add value and progressing the overall product aiming at end user, may be via improved performance, better call flow, ...


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Whether or not expectations are 'unrealistic' is highly situational and even opinion-based, so I'm not sure you could get a useful answer to your actual stated question. That being said, if your real concern is 'what to do when stakeholders care only about the User Interface (UI)', then an approach that may help is to simply include functionalities in their ...


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I understand where the question comes from, and I see that kind of concern a lot from engineers who I work with who sometimes feel that people who don't understand the code they are writing can't appreciate what they are doing. There is some merit to this, and I would suggest that any project manager who works in IT should do everything they can to ...


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Sergey Kudryavtsev is correct, it's not possible. The fundamental principal behind waterfall is that the Product Management work is done upfront: the marketplace is researched, the concept is generated, the customers are interviewed, the entire product is designed and then a comprehensive and exhaustive PRD is passed to Engineering which then develops the ...


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[...] due to my availability/be allocated to other projects my company has decided to outsource it. [...] I've been tasked with managing this project. Run! You supposedly have no time programming this, but you somehow are to find the time to manage a team of random strangers. That's madness. That will never happen. Project management is a job, not something ...


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First and foremost, you need a strong statement from sufficiently high up in the company to stop unauthorised conversations - especially with third parties - while the situation is clarified. The people who are talking to the outsourcers seem to be using these conversations as a lever to allow them to do something that they want to do but which may or may ...


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It sounds like you are dealing with a large team and I get the impression that you are doing scrum, or elements of it. If this is not the case you can probably disregard the rest of this post. Given the problems you describe I would suggest you break your large team into several smaller teams which work off the same backlog. It's a big organisational change,...


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We don't, because we don't care if employees stare at their screens and eat chips. We care about whether or not our company meets its contractual obligations to ship software by the dates it has committed to ship by. Whether people spend their day eating chips shouldn't affect that. The easiest way to monitor employees is to monitor their output, e.g. ...


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For each of the features listed think hard about if you actually need it for your early consumers, if you do then can you get the functionality from something else which is already built, if not then can you fake it by having a manual process in the short term. For example: Listing the products, you need this and will probably build it. For user registration,...


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