15

The PO is the owner of the product, but that doesn't mean they can do watever they want with the product. At the end of the day, they represent the needs and the wants of all stakeholders. Inevitably, you might end up in some situation where the PO has a different vision for the product than some of the stakeholders, but, like reasonable people, the PO and ...


8

State your case, CEO decides, you execute decision like your job depends on it.


6

I really love Wikipedia for definitions: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Governance https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strategy In summary: Governance includes everything to rule the project while strategy describes the way to achieve the project's goal. Having this, the project's governance should support or even follow a strategy in order to achieve the ...


4

What can, and should, a Product Owner / Product Manager do if the CEO has mandated that the team builds something which the Product Owner feels is not in the best interests of the customer? Build a case. Try and find metrics or measures that highlight the flaws in the suggested approach. Aside from presenting a case and aiming to influence the CEO's ...


3

TL;DR This is not an either/or situation. In a successful agile implementation, all parties collaborate on what product to build and how to validate that it's fit for purpose. If instead you're positing a non-collaborative environment where product decisions are set by diktat rather than through active collaboration between the value consumer and the Scrum ...


3

CEO's and their yes-men are always going to use the excuse that "the company has larger goals that may not align with what is in the best interest of the customer" to justify their decisions that effectively screw the customer over in favor of the company. But the reality IN REAL LIFE is that most businesses CANNOT continue making these decisions ...


2

Because Agile is a set of values and principles, there is not a set "Agile" way to approach strategy. If you're looking for a pure step-by-step, SAFe talks a lot about strategy or, if you don't want the whole framework, this article has some good stuff around using lean canvas for portfolio management. Of course, those are just other people trying to ...


2

This financial analysis divided by periods of the year (quarters, for example), is an important practice to analyze the performance of companies and to be able to exemplify the success or failure of their launches by means of concrete numbers, since these results are transparent, official and required by law. This is also a good way for its shareholders and ...


2

If it is a minor point, don't sweat it. But if it is a major point, in addition to the other answers, it might also be good to brush up your resume. Sometimes directors and executives don't make decisions for the good of the company, but so that they won't look bad. Sometimes it can also be for someone else to take the fall. If it is a director, document ...


1

Most of the time, companies don't aim to build something that is good for the customers, they aim to build something that is good for the company, it just happens to go through the way of also adding value to the customer. Take the example of addictive online games, it is not in the interest of the paying user, but it unfortunately is still a working ...


1

For my work, quarters are a useful artifact. I do long term scheduling, and I need a scope of work that is longer than a month but shorter than a year. I'm looking ahead between 0 and 4 years and trying to schedule work. My customers are comfortable picking a fiscal quarter, but probably would be overwhelmed if they tried to pick a month. Fiscal quarters ...


1

People have been using fractions of an year for ages to evaluate things and measure progress. Business and project management isn't any different. You measure per year, semester, trimester, quarter, monthly, or by any other interval you consider relevant for whatever you want to evaluate or for gaining information that allows you to take decisions on what to ...


1

First of all: great idea with the workshop! And thumbs up for OKRs! Ad your question: I've made good experiences with having the people who have the needed information plus your team in one room for some time. If your board supports you, this should be possible for at least half a day. So your team and the special department can develop the base for the OKRs ...


1

I personally do not believe there is an answer to this question. All predictive models have a predictive validity of something less than perfect. Certainly, some models or techniques are better than others but of those indicated in the OP (original post) I am not sure that is the case. In PM, I run several models because each would provide a datum that, ...


1

Governance is a verb. Governance is how you make decisions, how you govern. Strategy is what you want to do; strategy is the future you're hoping to get and the path you need to get there. Strategy is frequently encapsulated in strategic plans, tactical plans, vision statements, and even in project charters. A contrived example; every company has a ...


1

Moving directly is based on the perceived trust of the shareholders and executives. The speed at which you can change this relationship, totally depends on the cultural willingness of the organisation to firstly acknowledge they want to change, and then to follow this through with a committed approach. Its going to ultimately boil down to the working ...


1

None of the above. It depends solely on the people and culture of the organization. (also: collaboration is almost always a better choice. Competitors can collaborate, but collaborators have a hard time thriving in a highly competitive environment).


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