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Let me also please share a few insights from my many-decades-long career: When I began, minicomputers were the size of bread-boxes. Later on, when "PC's" ceased to be "a toy," you spent $3,000 for "one mega(!)byte and 33(!!) mega(!!!)-hertz," and thought that you'd spent your money wisely – because you had. "Customer-...


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I'm saddened to see all the responses suggesting some easy exit or simple solution involving some part of continued stifling of the team member. As previously stated, you must get those working agreements authored and committed to by the entire team via ceremonies intended to generate the agreements. From there using your Agile Practices, it's critical to ...


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In software projects, some amount of "waterfalling" is necessary: you have to consider technical requirements and potential technical impacts far in advance. I am also frankly very skeptical of terms like "maturity," especially as defined by a "strategy." I think that you should very-immediately focus on your case, your team, ...


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On Tuckman model, do teams using Agile frameworks mature faster in comparison to teams using Waterfall? Theoretically, yes. Practically, it's never that simple. You could think about the Tuckman model as a chemical reaction that the team needs to pass through and eventually reach a mature state in which the team performs at its best. And chemical reactions ...


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Yes, and perhaps we should remind ourselves that "software is a mechanism." It consists of a fairly-infinite number of "moving parts," each of which is quite capable of interacting with any other at any time. The "complexity" of such a system might well be "infinite." This is not true of "purely mechanical ...


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The Tuckman model was solely based on observations made on teams. There is no comparison between the types of work, types of teams, industries, methodologies, framework and how any of those things might produce different results as a team matures. Also, I recall no discussion on how to "speed" up the maturity level and that these observed ...


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I'm going to make an assumption that you mean Scrum. One of the common differences that you'll encounter as it relates to teams is that Scrum and some other frameworks and methodologies that fall under the Agile umbrella require or encourage long-lasting consistent, self-organizing teams. On the other hand, though it is not inherent in waterfall approaches, ...


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