13

Hat tip to Nvoigt, Nvogel & D. Espina - all good comments, with particular emphasis on D. Espina's "sometimes, knowing one of your team is overly optimistic, you simply add your own margins to their input." I'll just add one more frame to the question - this is a problem is in risk management. The core, fundamental responsibility of the PM is ...


11

In Scrum the team aims to complete the sprint goal by the end of the sprint. It shouldn't be necessary to estimate day-to-day deadlines since the delivery date is always the end of the sprint. I suggest you could stop trying to lead, stop estimating and allow the team to self-manage. A team of three people is quite small however, and one problem may be just ...


6

Notwithstanding your approach and whether you are performing it properly, research the affects of planning fallacies. A planning fallacy is a specific form of Optimism Bias, where we have a tendency of under estimating adverse variables that could impact our performance and, therefore, we predict far favorable results than what is most likely. The bias ...


4

I'd like add one more option on the table. In many cases estimation isn't really necessary. Situations when it can be useful: You need to sync with other teams which depend on you You need to predict the budget and decide if the project (or a feature) is worth starting In any case, if you estimate there has to be some decision made based on the estimates. ...


1

Joel Spolsky once wrote: https://www.joelonsoftware.com/2007/10/26/evidence-based-scheduling/ The mythical perfect estimator, who exists only in your imagination, always gets every estimate exactly right. ... A typical bad estimator has velocities all over the map.... Most estimators get the scale wrong but the relative estimates right. Everything takes ...


1

I think It depends on which kind of VCS do you use, the distributed one or the centralized VCS, and also on your organization's policies. "The main difference between the two classes is that Centralized VCSs keep the history of changes on a central server from which everyone requests the latest version of the work and pushes the latest changes (no one ...


1

If you use Version Control software there should not be a problem sharing code. You can easily see who changed what and when, and even why, if you insist they enter a comment when checking in. This makes code review - especially of changes - trivial. The version control software will also highlight conflicting changes to the same code, so that one fix doesn'...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible