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Commitment to quality is a team cultural thing and cannot be extrinsically incentivized. The team itself must create the culture. This in turn requires that management creates a supportive space so that the team can proceed to create the culture holistically. If management rushes the team, pushing for results faster, this may cause requirements to be missed....


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To me it sounds like there is too much going on at once. Instead of trying to figure out how to structure multiple projects at once and organize everyone into cross-functional meetings, etc, I would instead try to figure out how to create more focus. Here's the thing: people do not multi-task well. The more they are required to context-shift (for example by ...


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Don't bring people to projects, instead bring work to people. Form a team with a good mix of skills and then have them pull work off a backlog. It doesn't matter which projects the work is from, just that they have the capability to do the work. Prioritise the backlog so that work items for more important projects get done first. The advantages of this ...


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As also mentioned in the answer from @Sarov, money is not a good motivator for knowledge workers. Most of them have an intrinsic motivation to want to deliver quality work. So, to reward catching mistakes but not sloppy work, you should take advantage of that intrinsic motivation and build a company culture where people can be proud of the work they deliver,...


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Don't use money to reward quality. Studies show that money is an excellent motivator for routine tasks that involve no thinking, and a terrible motivator for tasks that require creativity. Experts are motivated by autonomy, mastery, and purpose [Spam disclaimer: No relation to the book nor author]. So: Create an environment that provides autonomy, ...


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