8

It's important to recognize that Scrum does not say that a team must be between 3 and 9 individuals. The Scrum Guide says that Scrum is most effective with a Development Team size of between 3 and 9 people. A Scrum Team (including the Product Owner and Scrum Master) would have an ideal size of 4-11. Development Teams that are smaller than 3 people or larger ...


8

It depends a bit on the situation, but from experience I've seen that a full-time, experienced Scrum Master is usually capable of handling two teams. Maybe three if the teams themselves are also highly experienced with Scrum. Note though that a Scrum Master is in no way attached to a project, but is always attached to a team. If your 10 people are in a ...


6

The three main reasons why a late project ends up later if more people are added to it are - as pointed out in the Wikipedia page: The new people need to learn, so they take time away from the existing people in the team for help. So less resources to do the work while the new people become productive and actually start contributing something. ...


6

I believe, there are no formulas for calculating "scale factor". There are too many factors, that may affect this parameter. Such as: Can work be done in parallel? Complexity of whole project. Communication ability of team members. Organization of your working process (take a look at this question: Number of communication channels in Chief-Programmer model)....


6

Honestly, as a technical lead of many teams, I will say if anyone had a formula for determining velocity, I would deem it ignorant at best, and out-right harmful at worst. Velocity is descriptive, not prescriptive. It is our jobs as leaders to use the data that is flowing in to forecast the future, but by no means could anyone say for an absolute certainty ...


5

In certain cases it is possible to get more work done if you introduce more people. The most usual scenario is when teams take time to do detailed scoping and when the project itself allows low coupling among the components. In my experience this has rarely happened. Communication grows a lot by adding a single member and administrative tasks requiere more ...


4

Probably, but my experience being the Scrum Master of two teams with greatly different context for nearly half a year was overwhelming. While having two teams on the same context wasn't. Constantly switching systems and context is not something everyone can handle. So I would recommend it to be sub-optimal and not something for the long-term. Trying to help ...


4

If your standup is taking 30-35 minutes, even with 12 people, the problem isn't the number of people, but what you're using the standup for. Standup is not for status updates. It is for blocker identification. Let's go over the traditional flow of someone's standup pitch: What I did yesterday - I say this so you are aware of changes that were made that ...


3

Thomas Owens has a good Answer, and I just wanted to expand upon it. The goal of the Scrum Master is to inform the Scrum Team of how Scrum works, and then to get out of the way. You (I am assuming you are the Scrum Master) should make sure the Team is well-educated about the whys for the problems (and, if you like, you can propose potential solutions) you ...


3

Are the workers of same skill? Do they use same tools? Can they work in tandem? Is the work allocated to them of similar complexity? Is the work environment same for all workers? If answer to the above questions is yes, then you can say that velocity is directly proportionate to the team size. If answer is no then its almost impossible to find out scale ...


3

Different tasks have different degrees of resources elasticity. And a task in itself can have different degrees of elasticity depending on other present variables like the environment. Imagine ten patients needing surgery with one surgeon. Then, add four more surgeons. Would anyone argue that the duration to complete those surgeries worsened? Hope not. ...


2

It depends also on following factors: Which functions you have? Actual functions of scrum master are very different in organizations. Is it a new team - new one requires much more time to be built effective Is it a new project - every project needs its own process, so you need some time to find and configure appropriate one. Does environment change quickly -...


2

A lot of the other answer, cover the case where there is a lot of independence. But what if there is no space on the team to add anyone, then is it ever possible. Hire a specialist in an area that you are stuck (on critical path). Introduce pair programming, each pair made up of one old-timer, and one newbie. Rotate the pairs each day, so that the newbies ...


2

One way to think about it is to consider if the task would be marked "Effort Driven" if you were creating an MS Project Plan for it. Effort driven tasks are actually expedited by adding people (at least up to a point). The Mythical Man Month idea that adding more people to a late software project will make it later is true for knowledge workers on a ...


1

The last Scrum team I was a part of was easily 20 members, and our daily standups rarely exceeded 15 minutes. The scrum was for a quick status. What did I work on / finish yeasterday, what am I working on today, what roadblocks do I have. Anything that the whole team wasn't interested in was tabled for a side discussion after the standup. This worked well. ...


1

I definitely agree on what Roberto Anzaldua posted. From what I observed: If you give a tightly coupled codebase to someone new to the project, he/she will need to dissect which parts he needs to work on. There might be some higher learning curve, since the new engineer needs to learn how his work will interact with the existing codebase and may need to ...


1

Adding extra people to a project can work quite well if you have planned it out in advance. In my team, we have a few external people who are up to date with our systems and can help us out if needed. One is a former employee who took a year off to go travelling and is available to do some temporary work to fund her travels. She knows the codebase and the ...


1

Is there any other scenario that could work? I think you are approaching this from an angle of what works functionally. You already know it does not. Look at it from another angle: as a project manager, who do you want to be? The active, try-your-best guy who pours more manpower into a late project that then fails anyway despite all your best efforts? Or ...


1

I read a book about 10 years ago that discusses this beautifully by Fred Brooks. The Mythical Man Month: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Mythical_Man-Month His constant argument is adding people increases the time to deliver. I believe he settled on a team of about 7 - from memory he is considering large scale projects, each person tends to have defined ...


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