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Let's take a closer look at the specific "traditional BA responsibilities": Clarifying bugs/bug requirement analysis: The developers analyse/fix bug tickets created by users because they have the most knowledge about how the system should behave. If you add an additional layer of BA's analysing bug tickets, from my experience it takes them ...


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Up-front caveat... I have limited formal Agile (especially Scrum) experience, however I have used aspects of Agile approaches fairly widely, and some of my teams have included people with BA skills. I would anticipate that a BA-type role could be used quite widely within a project being run using formal Agile (including Scrum) principles. Firstly, to support ...


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How does a Scrum Team handle traditional BA responsibilities? A skilled analyst is a useful asset for a Scrum team. How well they work in a Scrum team comes down to a matter of timing. The challenge is for the BA to do the analysis in a manner that allows the team to respond quickly to change. They need to avoid tying the team in to a particular approach ...


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To answer this effectively, it is important to split roles, job titles, and skills. Scrum has absolutely nothing to say about job titles, so we can actually resolve that fairly quickly by saying: as long as a particular "job" does not expressly conflict with Scrum, it is "allowed" in the Scrum framework.That isn't to say that particular ...


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In my 12-people team there are 2 BAs* and at the moment we have 24 tickets (bugs, new features, technical stuff) in the backlog. So I disagree that having BAs imply a lot of upfront work. As for the Scrum, as I discussed in the comments - it doesn't seem like it allows BAs: You can think of them as POs, but most of the time BAs aren't stakeholders If you ...


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I have seen many business analysts work well in Scrum teams. The three biggest challenges for them are typically: Reaching a clear understanding of roles and responsibilities with the Product Owner Adjusting to the just-in-time nature of Scrum - looking to add detail at the latest possible moment Becoming good at responding to change - taking feedback from ...


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There are two answers here - the Scrum answer and the my practical answer. In Scrum, there are three "accountabilities" (prior to the November 2020 revision, roles) on a Scrum Team - Scrum Master, Product Owner, and Developer. A team has one Scrum Master, one Product Owner, and everyone fits into one of these buckets. However, if there are multiple ...


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TL;DR The canonically-correct solution is to put someone with business analysis skills onto the Scrum Team in a Developer role, and then cross-train the whole Scrum Team. Cross-pollination of skills enhances the capabilities of the Scrum Team and the Developers, and builds T-shaped people. Including someone skilled in business analysis on the Scrum Team also ...


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I usually see BAs work in one of two ways. Sometimes they assist on items being developed in the current sprint by providing their domain expertise to developers, helping to fill in any missing details and working with users and testers to understand any problems. Requirements don't have to be fully defined at the time of sprint planning - they just need to ...


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Scrum just says that the team needs to have all the skills needed to build the product and all the product increments leading up to the final result. Although no other role than "developer" is identified in Scrum, teams often contain specialized skills, like front-end developer, back-end developers, testers, designers, etc. So if the product you ...


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