7

The direct answer to your question is that how you bill your time to the client is not addressed in Scrum. Therefor there is no billing model that is expressly anti-scrum. If adding a place on the board where you track time is the easiest way for your team to keep tabs on it, feel free. Now, there are billing models that can incentivize anti-Scrum behaviors. ...


6

Scrum works best if you have good product ownership, fixed-length iterations and a stable team. If the backlog is determined by the client and the team is stable then (barring leave and unexpected absences) I would expect the cost per iteration to be fixed. So if you need to apportion cost per item then the right way is surely to divide the iteration cost (...


4

TL;DR Scrum is based on an empirical control methodology. While not directly stated in the Scrum Guide, it essentially posits a roughly-constant run rate for each Sprint, allowing predictable budgeting through estimating the number of Sprints that are likely needed to reach a "good enough" target. (See Agile Release Planning for more on this.) ...


4

I'm confused. You say you bill hours to the client. By that I understand "hours of work". Scrum ceremonies are part of the work the team is doing. When you hold a daily standup for example, you do so in order for the team to coordinate their work in the sprint. You talk about work there, not the weather, or how your cat stuck its head into a jar ...


1

I would suggest the use of a prioritized list + scheduling recurring blocks of dedicated time to work on the items on the list. The schedule ensures that you are dedicating time to Important Non-Urgent tasks, and the prioritized list ensures that you don't have to waste that dedicated time trying to decide exactly how to spend it. If some of the items are ...


1

It is bad practice because Scrum has no ceremonies. Scrum has events and they serve for inspection and adaptation. Planning work and monitoring progress is not overhead but an integral part of the delivery process. This is clear in the Scrum Guide. From the client's point of view, time-tracking is interesting because they do not want to pay for team lunch, ...


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