8

I've done Agile UX (UX within an agile SCRUM team) some years ago and doing it in-team and within the sprint isn't feasible. It's just "naive", because Agile is a developer workflow, not a design workflow. I struggled a while until I recognized the many problems, that occur with that working style and looked around for help - and it is a quite common ...


7

TL;DR You lack clarity about your role, the role of the project manager, and the necessity for change control on a formal project. It is extremely likely that you lack the delegated authority to make resource allocation decisions for the project, and that attempting to set engineering priorities directly would bypass the project's change control process. ...


6

TL;DR Scrum uses just-in-time analysis and design in its iterative development model. This certainly includes UX. It is up to your self-organizing team to coordinate with one another to ensure that prerequisites like analysis and design are performed in a timely way, and that task and story dependencies are handled as efficiently as possible within the ...


5

My advice: Set aside time for your team to learn some basic UX/usability, whether it's looking over blogs or videos together or actual training. Even if you get a dedicated person later, helping your team become more T-shaped will pay dividends. Work together to create a proxy for a UX designer, i.e. a visual style guide that can be followed by almost ...


5

It's the product owners duty to define acceptance criteria. This can include usability features. For example: As a color blind user, I want to use this feature without any impediments It's the engineers duty to figure out how to do that. For example: Subtask: As a user, I want my color blindness settings from the main application to take effect when ...


5

Does PM get to have final say about UX? No, the client holds that power. But the PM should verify if building a UX vision is part of the project scope or not. If it is not a project deliverable and if by working on UX tasks the project scope/time would increase then the PM is correct in rejecting those suggestions as scope creep. What should you do? For ...


4

A sprint backlog contains 40 story points and all are UI specialist work, and only 1 person is available to do them with another 5 being left with nothing to do. Have the other 5 help the 1 person in other ways: Optimizing images using graphicsmagick Dogfooding the UI for security and feasability gaps Nearly always UX, usually UI and sometimes front end ...


4

There are two components to A/B Testing. The first is the "why". The second is the "how". I'll start with the "how" first. This is the implementation. This is the technical details that developers should handle. Depending on what exactly you need to test they might need to configure something, make a small change in the code, or make a big change in the ...


4

There a couple of ways to approach the challenge, but (like some others have said) trying to force it into a framework that is meant for execution and measurement will just frustrate you. Instead I recommend looking at models that are meant to complement the execution of known features. Some have described it as a "dual track" model, where you have some ...


3

It's worth noting that a team is not only cross-functional, but also self-organizing. This means specialists should be open and honest about whether their skills can help achieve a sprint goal set during Sprint Planning. The team is empowered to use their skill constraints as a means to address work that is deemed valuable for the sprint goal. This means ...


3

Altough I realize this is an old question I believe it is still relevant. I am currently in the same situation. That is, trying to figure out how to best implement the UX perspective into a scrum process. We do not have the resources to allocate a UX-designer per se in the scrum team but we do have different people responsible for areas such as navigation, ...


3

I believe you hit the nail on the head when you said: I mean it is obvious this is because UX is visible unlike code refactoring Project Managers tend to assert control over all aspects of the application, but especially over what he/she, and the user, can see and interact with. In this case, it seems like a relatively simple change and I'm a bit ...


2

tl;dr The PM has (or should have) sufficient power to ensure that the scope is completed on time, on budget and is suitable to the customer. The PM is the executive agent for all of the stakeholders, and for the sponsor. The solution to the problem is to recruit the PM as an ally rather than an adversary. Does the PM have a vested interest in ...


2

Because UX is a forward-facing element. You mention in your question, If my code was part of API, obviously it would have better supervision The UX is the API to the end-user, if you think about it. You don't have to look farther than MS Office to see how changing the experience can cause problems even if it's now "better".


2

Vertical slices minimize dependencies between stories You are attempting to horizontally slice the larger epic (by architecture) into user stories: we have stories for UX design, Front end development(which depends on UX) and then the back-end development(which depends on front-end) Instead, try to create vertical slices of the larger epic. This will ...


2

During refinement you discovered another design and went with that one instead of what you thought originally. It happens. That's what refinement is for. To add details to the backlog items, acceptance criteria, estimates, priorities, etc. If you discover better ways to add value to the product, or conditions change, or you get new insight into what youare ...


2

I realize that most of the time Scrum restricts the creative culture. I'm so sick and tired of people saying "Scrum does this" or "Scrum does that" when in reality, they could read a short few pages of paper and see that they are wrong. Your creativity is restricted because you do "design up front". Nowhere in Scrum does it say ...


2

As you've probably seen from the diverse answers, there is no silver bullet. The answers I see are about how to organize the way you approach UI/UX now in a better way to improve flow or work distribution. Those are all awesome places to start. You will hit a ceiling on that improvement pretty fast. UI/UX is a lot like DBA work and Testing work in that the ...


2

Answer is 2. For both Scrum and UX you do the following steps: Design pattern or Plan Implement design or DO A/B test, test Improve


2

First, it is important to consider that, as you already have an up-front design and are simply implementing it, you are not practicing anything like Scrum or XP. This is not a value judgement - it's fine - just realize that the tool of user stories is not designed for what you're doing. This, in turn, begs the question: Why do you want to use User Stories. ...


1

"Build then Measure then Learn" - It sounds to me like Lean. Not Scrum and UX. "Plan then Do then Check then Review" - Is it not PDCA with a tweak? The 'act' is replaced with 'review' to give it a scrumish feeling, but it is not Scrum and not UX. "Discovery then Sprint Delivery then Sprint" - Whatever it is, has nothing to do ...


1

Scrum is founded on empirical process control theory, or empiricism Scrum is founded on empirical process control theory, or empiricism. Here is a detailed justification of the above by Ken Schwaber, who jointly developed the Scrum framework with Jeff Sutherland. The Three Pillars of Empiricism are: Transparency: Significant aspects of the process must be ...


1

Fascinating question and more subtle than I originally thought. According to this graph, as investment into an unexpected/new/innovative feature's functionality is increased, user satisfaction goes up exponentially. In fact, according to the graph, at the higher end of investment, where we perhaps have a disproportionately large part of our budget and ...


1

A UI design can't be considered "final" before the users have seen it in action and tested it. If you are in the early stages of something that doesn't yet exist then I suggest you only write the minimum number of stories and least amount of detail you need for the next iteration. For later iterations you can have placeholder epics if you need them ...


1

What you are describing is expected behavior, not something unusual that needs to be fixed. As you work on the UI you will think of functionality that now need stories, and while writing the stories you will think of use cases that now need to be incorporated into the UI. So, to answer your questions in reverse order: Is there any suggestion which can be ...


1

What is the best time to start writing stories ? You should have a product backlog of all the features, and refine the prioritized stories sufficiently before every sprint. Should we finalize the UI design first instead of writing stories ? It goes hand-in-hand, hi-level design + hi-level features, detailed finalized design-> detailed stories. Is it fine ...


1

In traditional project management, most UX activities occur during the early (Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC) phases. Personas and scenarios would be created as requirements are gathered and analyzed. Application flow and style guides would be created during the design phase. In modern product management, the user is an active participant ...


1

"Final Say" is a Business Decision; Consult the Framework or Charter Is is better for product or the engineers to have the final say for UX/design decisions? Or should it be a majority vote? The answer is: "Neither. Both. It depends." Your underlying assumption seems to be that authority for making decisions rests on expertise in UX or product design, ...


1

I would rephrase your question like this: "we are few people in a ship and none of us is qualified to be a captain. How should we navigate the ship - let the kitchen staff do it or have us all participate by majority vote?" Of course, the right answer lies outside the two options you're suggesting. You must either hire an external expert or train (one of) ...


1

As a commenter said, only PMI can answer this. However, having earned been through the PMP process (and having been audited on my experience by PMI) I would say that sounds good. There are lots of types of 'projects' out there: Even a lot of functional managers do bits of PM work here and there. The most important thing I can say is be honest, and expect to ...


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