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The problem you are encountering is that you are starting with a solution in mind. Then you are breaking down that solution into its pieces. The problem you are raising is not really one with user stories. It is: how do you solve a piece of a user need quickly so you can learn more about that need. Last week, I finished a market poll app in 5 hours. I didn't ...


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Part of the problem is defining what "delivered" means. Does it mean integrated and demonstrated? Does it mean deployed? Does it mean that a feature flag has been enabled? Depending on the context the team is working in, it could mean any of these. The definition could also shift over time as the team refines its capability to design, develop, test,...


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I think that it's also fair to say that – "sometimes user stories (and scrum in general) live up to those ideals, and sometimes they just don't." The concept of a "user story" is really just a guide to help you break down the work into small units, and to tie those units very closely to things that the end-user will actually observe. ...


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Don't get hung up on writing the perfect user story. Instead, if this is a new product that you are building from scratch, focus instead on: defining a big picture of what the product should do; split that vision into pieces, actions, and actors (you can use a technique called User Story Mapping for that, and create epics and user stories); place these ...


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One user story will not give you a releasable product that represents some value to an end user This clause is added to get over the mindset of previous Waterfall practices. Doing analysis alone or doing design alone is not a valid user story. The story must result in some shippable code, which is what represents value to the user. can be delivered during ...


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Some examples of "sprint 1" stories for an e-commerce site: As a new customer I want the ability to sign-up for an account so that I can purchase As a potential customer I want to browse a catalogue of products Some examples for an HR application: As an HR user I want the ability to login As an HR user I want to retrieve an employee's details by ...


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Backlog should contain any work items Gathered from multiple sources and own experience, my opinion is that Backlog should contain any work items including but not limited to: user stories from all your stakeholders this is business functionality risk mitigation items eg. when we need to do some work or investigation in order to remove uncertainty / ...


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The Scrum Guide does not say that a backlog item has to be in the form of a user story. You may write the backlog item the way you like, or more precisely the way the team prefers it to be.


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I generally agree with Ashok's post above, but I find that in actual practice a "task-based view" and a "story-based view" often exist side-by-side, and that "tasks" are not strictly tied to "stories." Because they don't have to be. I find that "a 'user story' is exactly that: an expression from a hypothetical-...


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In Scrum, backlog is a list of outstanding user stories You are using the terms backlog, user stories and sprint. So, I will answer this in the context of Scrum. Scrum is recommended for projects, such as software development, where requirements can change late in the cycle and technology could throw some unpredictable challenges. Let us say that you want to ...


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