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3

How I do it: I set up a grid. Across the top I have a size scale. I actually don't use numbers at first. Rather, I use ice cream: taster cup, single scoop, double scoop, sundae, banana split, bucket. I'll come back to why later. On the left side, I have a list of things. Usually I use household chores and tasks, but you could even use real backlog items. I ...


6

Short introduction + practice run I would write a short presentation about what SPs are and how they are used (a summary of this explanation should work nicely; the dogs example is really intuitive). I would also mention some pitfalls or common mistakes just to get some of them out of the way, since people will have a few questions. Trying to provide some ...


2

TL;DR Should I be using user stories as my documentation? No, most definitely not. A user story is a conversation placeholder, not a written specification or unit of documentation. Especially in software development, your "documentation" should comprise working code with descriptive names, comments, and tests that clearly describe how the system ...


0

For me, this seems to be the classic JIRA - Confluence case. When you define your requirements in JIRA as user stories, your "Done" stories basically cease to exist to form a concise product specification. You can still look them up and update, but this is a nightmare, as described in the question. For a way more practical solution, JIRA or a ...


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