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5

I do have a few questions... If the work is rather straightforward and the way the UI is created and the integrations are solved are standardized, then a process framework optimized for complex work, may just add overhead. If the work is standardized it may just not be required to break down into smaller bits to learn along the way. The development team ...


4

TL;DR Some frameworks have a distinct name for the type of work you're asking about, but some don't. To understand why, a short preface is in order. Work is work. While it's sometimes necessary to differentiate different types of work for cost-accounting or political reasons, treat this as an opportunity to educate your organization and your stakeholders ...


4

I'm not seeing a contradiction here. First, Scrum requires a predictable cadence. The cadence of Scrum is the Sprint, which begins with Sprint Planning and ends with Sprint Review and Sprint Retrospective. The length of a Sprint is generally fixed. Although it is possible to change the length of the team's Sprints based on stakeholder feedback or ...


3

Other answers about splitting stories are good, but I think there's a separate problem here. As I mentioned in the comments, the BA and designer jobs are traditionally defined by their ability to design complex systems. It may be a very large jump for them to not take this approach. (It certainly was for me when I transitioned to Agile) Perhaps instead of ...


3

TL;DR The Product Owner can track business value or other information on items in the Product Backlog. However, from a process perspective, only the sequential order of Product Backlog Items really matters. The sequence can be negotiated with the Product Owner, but that person is the sole and final arbiter of Product Backlog contents, including its ordering....


3

There are a few points to consider on this. 1) Scrum uses PBIs. Product Backlog Items are all the things that make up the product backlog. Any item that you have to do can be an item in the product backlog. You can use user stories and spikes, and all kinds of other special techniques in doing your work, but there is nothing that says "Walk the dog" isn't a ...


2

Agile is all about (sometimes brutal) transparency. If the initial feature release requires a lot of expense and effort then that is what should be reflected. The release of Customer Facing Feature 1 has involved a lot of time, effort and cost A good agile organisation will question this. Perhaps they will ask: Is this really the minimum viable release?...


2

That you have a "predictable cadence" did not mean you have a predictable output of PBIs. The cadence is the time framework, tells you when you will do which scrum events. Starting from the dailies up to the retrospective. It may happen that you will not achieve (some) of your sprint goals but it should not happen permanently. If you permanently ...


2

Through its events (the sprint itself, planning, daily, review, and retrospective), Scrum does indeed provide a cadence for the team to do the work. It is a rhythm that the team uses to do the work. Within this rhythm, the team will develop a velocity. You can then use velocity to make predictions about future progress. Don't confuse the cadence with the ...


1

"I see it a lot, but ..." A team should not "embark upon a sprint" as a way of learning how the technology works or how the goal should be achieved. Unfortunately the methodology is fairly silent on how you should account for this very-important task. As the Perl folks like to say, "There's More Than One Way To Do It,™" and ...


1

Some organizations buy materiel and inventory it until it is claimed by a project. At that time, the project recognizes the costs as AC. If you can account for costs in that manner, a matter of debits and credits on the books, then you can spread those costs more evenly across your project. However, that is not your only solution. The problem you are ...


1

Whenever you find a job title that's not very common, it usually means that the company tried to put a name on some job responsibilities that are wider than what existing job titles can cover, like Project Manager for example. The job title usually also sounds cool and implies a certain degree of authority. You can't really know what it means until you read ...


1

It all depends on how you define business value and priority. It would be easier if you forget about the labels and focus on the final goal: the final goal is to create a product that doesn’t have all the possible features, and yet has the highest benefit/development_cost ratio among the products with different combinations of features that are created with ...


1

Some of that initial infrastructure can be demo'd to customers at sprint reviews to help educate them on why and how it is delivering things that are of value to them. For example, CI/CD: "Look, my tests will run every time I commit/merge something! And if I commit something wrong... (do so)... look, it tells me right away! This buys us both quality and ...


1

I hope you can coach them by presenting the problem in a different light, so they can come to the solution themselves. One idea. Can you present the problem to them as very high level user stories, or perhaps personas? Ie As a customer service representative I need to do X, Y and Z to do my job As an admistrator I need to do A, B and C to do my job. And ...


1

Alignment Maps could be used to link user stories to business cases: Alignment maps are organizational information radiators that help visualize the alignment of ongoing work with business outcomes. The work may be regular functionality addition or technical work such as re-architecting or repaying technical debt or improving the build and ...


1

The first metric is at least 10 times more important than any of the others. Does it fulfill the company's strategic mission? If the company doesn't know why it created a PMO, then the PMO should be shut down. Someone else will quote the precise number but if I recall correctly 90% of PMO's fail in 3 years, largely because they serve no strategic ...


1

Very, very subjective. To sell anything to anyone you need to understand the context in which it will help them. What pain points are they having? Those are the things you want to target with your pitch. Much easier to sell water once you know the client is thirsty. Having said that, PMI have a good whitepaper that outlines some of the points you could ...


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