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9

As you've mentioned, it needs to be an elevating vision or goal. In light of the latter, I think the SMART principle and Time Map philosophies apply here. Let's start with the Time Map (to learn more, check out Time Management from the Inside Out by Julie Morgenstern): You know you can't devote all your resources because client projects take precedence. ...


5

If you are talking about setting goals then go with TechWire's answer. I won't elaborate as I don't have anything of value to add. If you are talking about creating a shared vision for your team/organization it is a different kettle of fish. When you develop a vision you have to think big, aligning the vision to your core values and corporate mission. Take ...


4

Mark Wallace is correct that this is primarily a people issue not a technology or Scrum-technique issue. Fortunately there are some people-techniques that work to resolve certain sorts of people issues. Your issue here is resolvable. Daniel's answer touches (brilliantly) on the phenomenon here: that different personalities can have wildly different work ...


4

You may have a difficult conversation to have with the stakeholder. To be perfectly blunt, work with no pressure or stress is called a hobby. I don't recommend you lead with that. What might help is this: Agile (and it sounds like Scrum would be particularly helpful) focuses on getting work complete through small increments. You start with a foundation idea ...


3

Scrum doesn't really cover the strategic part of planning. In terms of building a vision and a general roadmap Scrum itself won't help you much. However, at this level planning doesn't really differ from what you know, or should know, from other methods. So unless you know, in general, what you want to build don't bother with going deep into any method. ...


3

TL;DR Pithy slogans belong on coffee mugs. Real vision statements guide your organization's strategic goals. Vision Statements Defined According to a Wikipedia entry: [A vision statement] outlines what the organization wants to be, or how it wants the world in which it operates to be (an "idealised" view of the world). It is a long-term view and ...


3

The first steps of an Inception Deck might be a good way to define a project vision. In particular the four first questions are dedicated to make sure that everybody is on the same page about what the project is and is not. In short: Why are we here? What is the number one motivation that makes your customer want to spend money on the project? The main ...


2

I recommend to check out the Beyond Budgeting approach from Bjarte Bogsnes which talks about the ambition to action process. The ambition to action is a very interesting process and an effective vision and tool setting idea. It is a process which empowers strong performance, sustainable results, strategic objectives, KPIs, actions and forecasts. Here is a ...


2

I guess you're getting off on the wrong foot here - Your goal needs to be validated first (for realism :) - and the water cooler chat showed other signs Now, assume everyone from all the teams you want/have to work with gave a list of "my commitments" to you. You laid them all out on the table, what are they chances that they would be in perfect sync, ...


2

I recommend taking a leaf from Tom Gilb's book and actually trying to put some metrics around "quality" and "efficiency". This may mean splitting them up. For instance, if part of "quality" is "ease of maintenance", can you put a metric on it? How long should it take to fix a minor bug? How long to ship it to production? What's that like compared to your ...


2

Great question, and kudos for being concerned enough about the bigger picture to reach out. A team I worked on a couple years ago was in the same boat as you are: great at the day to day but a bit lost when it came to the bigger picture. We found interactive story mapping really helped everyone understand not only WHAT they would work on next, but WHY. ...


2

There are a lot of variables in your situation that I don't know the answer to and so I'll try to keep my suggestions as high-level as I can. Either way, please use them as only a starting point. 5 Levels of Planning First I'd look at the 5 levels of planning. There's a lot of info to look up on this, but the short version is that they are: Vision ...


1

My company recently added a top-level strategic roadmap. It has a separate project for each department (marketing, sales, dev, HR and etc.) and each project has only a few works in it with department head being responsible. Looks like this (not an actual thing):


1

The Vision is the expected end state, especially as it pertains to the business/user/customer facing end state. Simple example: Umbrella or similar product Vision: when walking outside I will be, using a light-weight, easily portable device, protected from sun, rain, wind. Proposal will describe what product or service the contracting organization will ...


1

I would rather adopt an empirical view of things. I would constantly inspect the current state of the project/team/department and have an open discussion with the team to determine what is slowing down, impacting performance and reducing quality. The next is to be transparent about the findings to all interested parties. By being open and honest about ...


1

Mind that Scrum talks about potentially shippable increments (PSI) as opposed to potentially shippable code! Of course you can ship code, but you can ship other things as well. For example, a product-vision document could be a shippable increment. Sprints with the goal do gain insight are often called Exploration Sprints. They are not unusual. In general, ...


1

TL;DR There are often debates between Scrum practitioners about whether to have a Sprint Zero or not. You can side-step the various arguments by redefining what the Sprint Goal will be for the first sprint, and by adjusting expectations of what will be demonstrated in the Sprint Review. Sprint Goal Sometimes, the drive to have a "Sprint Zero" seems like a ...


1

is it OK to have a Sprint 0 with no deliverable code? Remaining true to Scrum framework, the answer would be NO. Can you time-box the Sprint 0? If the answer is no then you would be violating two important factors of Scrum framework, first time-boxing and the second potentially deliverable code at the end of each sprint. As you have mentioned that the ...


1

Are you the only one talking to your boss about this, and is the discussion ad hoc? If this is the case I don't think you've got a "vision" so much as an "opinion" on what your priorities should be. A vision provides you with guidance on what your overriding priorities are with everything your organization does. It should dovetail into your corporate values,...


1

No real templates necessary. It's more of guiding down a set of questions and discussions. I like Rami's answer. I also use the five W's - who, what, when, where, and most important - -why? Start with discussing the 'why'. Why are we doing this? Why was this group formed? What need are we trying to fill? Why 'us'? What's the "to-be" vision? Do we all agree ...


1

Ken Schwaber has said that "The minimum plan necessary to start a Scrum project consists of a vision and a Product Backlog". The Product Owner is responsible for the overall product and should lead the creation of the vision. This should happen through close collaboration with the team. Conversations with stakeholders that have appropriate experience in ...


1

Have you come across "Feature Injection" at all? It works very well with Scrum and other Agile methodologies, and helps you to draw out the backlog from your initial project vision. I wrote an article on it, or you can also read Chris Matts' comic (he invented it). As a short summary, it helps you: Identify a vision Identify the goals of various ...


1

First things first Vision should come after mission and values discussion. Vision must be associated with values as it communicates both the purpose and values of the organization. Proposed steps In one of my recent projects, I used below steps: 1. Open discussion I found good guided questions and steps on Mission Statement Builder for teams. I used ...


1

There is a difference between a management strategy and a tactic. In fact, you have your management vision that includes a plan, and that plan include strategies and tactics. (to put it simply). A strategy is a general way of doing things, whereas a tactic is a specific task that helps you acheive your strategy. You could have for example a strategy like:...


1

Who, what, where, when, why, and how. Answer those question and you have a strategy. Answer them with specificity, and you have a plan.


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