1

Is there a difference and if ‘yes’ does there exist a definition of their scopes?

I was asking aunt Google but got the impression from job descriptions that the scope or responsibilities overlap greatly. Is this the case?

  • no difference at all,manager sometimes is the owner secretary,the project assistant is the secretary of the project manager and the secretary is always the secretary – user32539 Jun 13 '18 at 13:13
  • This has been covered multiple times - search for the terms on this SE. If it hasn't been covered, we need to collect all these questions into a single question with a CW answer. Yes, the scope overlaps greatly; job titles are set arbitrarily, and there is no reason why they would conform to any standard. – Mark C. Wallace Jun 14 '18 at 9:55
  • See project roles among others. – Mark C. Wallace Jun 14 '18 at 10:03
2

This depends on the organization. Larger organizations tend to have more defined job roles. Smaller organizations often have people who wear many hats on a project, and the person who "gets things done" will be tasked with things, regardless of their role.

I've worked as most of those roles one time or another within the same company, so I think I can give an apples to apples view, mind the small sample size.

As a Project Coordinator, most of the work was related to scheduling project deliverables within a part of the project, scheduling meetings, and minor procurement. I would also do meeting notes. I found this similar to secretarial, but that does a disservice to secretarial skills, as I have no formal training in document management which is huge.

As a Project Assistant / Junior PM, I did everything I was doing as a coordinator, but I also did more work communicating with clients and other stakeholders, having more input on the project plan, and doing project financials.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.