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10

This is a difficult and touchy subject. You may open up a Pandora's Box, so be absolutely certain that this is a big enough issue for you to push. I would suggest: Have a very clear listing of how you are adding value to the company. If you can't clearly say why you deserve more money you won't convince anyone. I've had an employee ("X") demand more salary ...


9

To my mind, any PM position comes down to understanding what has to be delivered, in what order, when, by whom and with what permissions. In construction, things are more concrete (excuse the pun!) perhaps than in e-commerce, but those fundamentals do not change. Reading about software development life cycles is good, but what you need to understand is ...


9

Project management is a profession; it represents a career path and a body of knowledge while still allowing for specialization. This is no different than a doctor specializing in geriatrics or pediatrics. A project manager is a functional role within a project team that should ideally be filled by a project management professional. Other roles within a ...


8

What if you gave each 'candidate' a smaller project to manage as a 'test drive'? As they gain experience it is easier to assess how good they are at the job. Or take an even more radical approach: Why not try taking turns on being project manager within the team? That way all team members start acquiring skills and you are never short of a person who can ...


6

Your feelings on the matter are irrelevant. What does matter is the salary and wage data for your position in your area and your best alternative to a negotiated agreement, balanced against your employer's set of alternatives. If you choose to make this approach, you need to come armed with data. What is the salary range and distribution for your role ...


6

This is a great question! It inspired me to take action and do some research of my own. I interviewed one of my techie colleagues, and I wrote this blog post titled Monday’s interview – Tech Talk with Ciprian. I asked some more questions related to the same issue: "how much tech is too much tech in PM" :). I hope this helps! Here's a snippet from the ...


6

I'm a living example of not being a technical expert, instead being a team expert. I have worked across a broad swath of high tech for twenty years and also applied my project skills to very non-technical endeavors. I've heard the arguments for domain knowledge: "How will you know if the estimate is false?" - If I can't look at my team and know someone is ...


5

The skill, knowledge, and experience of every role on the team is chosen to allow the highest likelihood of success. Every project (even the same type of project done at different times) is different, with differing requirements, a different sponsor, and most importantly a different environment. The analysis of the environment is critical. If the sponsor ...


5

Yes and no. The controls you put into place are the same no matter the size. A project is a project. However, when you are dealing with more money, you are dealing with more risk, so the rigor and formality will increase. This means your documentation becomes more formal, your processes more explicit and monitored, your inspections formally scheduled.


5

Fascinating question and an excellent interview question. (Technically a poor fit for PM:SE because there is no authoritative answer - which is what makes it a great interview question). That said, I think it is fascinating. I think you covered the most important element - which is to avoid acting as a developer. So what does the manager do that the ...


4

What are common trainings for those soft skills? in my case it was a book ("Getting things done" by David Allen). Imho, following GTD methodology a great way to become organized and result-oriented Defining projects, breaking them into actionable items and assigning contexts really helps to achieve desired results


4

In addition to what Doug B have said. If you already know how much you would like do earn, go for couple interviews and make sure that the market is ready to pay so. Knowing that (I assume that market is ready for your salary) go to your employer and follow steps a,b,c by Doug. Why so? Because doing this you make yourself confident. That will be visible in ...


4

I see this happen all of the time with System Architects. Their specialized skills are needed by multiple teams, but no single team consumes all of their time during the sprint. The best solution I've seen for this type of situation is to have the group of specialized individuals (architects, designers, whatever) operate as their own scrum team making ...


4

TL; DR Big-budget projects aren't about pinching Lincoln until he screams; they're about deliverable high-stakes business value. The frameworks, and most of the controls, will remain the same. It's your perspective that needs to change most. Impact of Budget on Frameworks From a framework standpoint, the project's budget has nothing to do directly with ...


4

An interesting question and the right kind for anyone who wants to build their career to be asking. Every answer you receive will involve some (or many) generalizations. For context, I will keep the discussion to custom software development projects that are an order of magnitude above what you are doing now. Project Characteristics The characteristics of ...


4

From my experience, I would say the problem here is "leadership". I am just taking couple of points from your statement. Team not successful in convincing clients when requirement creeps Team do not give importance to communication skills and they believe it is not a part of their job These are things that should be driven by a strong leader. The leader ...


4

...has produced great results so far. Sounds promising! I can think of several approaches to managing skills improvement / professional development in the context of scrum: Arguably, professional development could be considered "all part of the day's work" which is supposed to go on during a sprint. If you're figuring sprint capacity supposing that, say, ...


3

Presumably your company likes to think it pays its employees at market rate (or thereabouts), so you have to prove that you've paid less than the market values you at. So go and get yourself a job offer (or, preferably, more than one) at a higher salary from another company. This has the bonus that if you employer still doesn't think you're underpaid, you ...


3

What should I do (reading books/blogs etc.) to try to become a successful PM. Here is a very good summary: how and what to learn new to project management Is this move logical? I know I cannot see myself as an architect after 5 years. I'm not sure that there's a good answer to this question. If you plan to have a carrier and you don't have architect ...


3

Instead of thinking about project management as an actual position, think of it as a role. Many organizations have goals they want to meet that don't necessarily involve needing to hire a full time person yet still need someone to own the process and see things through, which includes planning, communication, and other project management tasks. When the ...


3

welcome to PMSE! What should I do (reading books/blogs etc.) to try to become a successful PM. @Zsolt's link is good, but I believe your question is far wider than this... therefore, for such a complex question, you won't find a specific answer. Nevertheless, I'd start with Daily visiting PMSE (oh wait, we're already doing it!); Searching on youtube (...


3

A lot of Project Managers feel that their job is simply to schedule meetings and maintain a spreadsheet of tasks and issues and then nag developers until the job is complete. But that is just doing the administrative portion of the job. The real value-add of a good project manager is to think. To ask questions and draw out answers from developers and ...


3

It may sound unusual, but it might work: leave for a week without telling anybody what they are supposed to do while you are away. The idea behind is that the managers don't want to pay more for the same job, unless the absence of person causes troubles and they want to avoid the further problems. When I work with young team leaders I often ask them to do ...


3

For some reason, there is a huge bias in IT around core IT knowledge and success as a PM. I think the bias exists in other industries, as well, but it seems to be elevated in IT. The fact that the IT shop exists solely because of the business in which it supports seems to be lost. The bad news is, the largest hurdle you face is this bias. The good news ...


3

One - estimation - project managers with IT background have good experience and are better at estimation of IT project-simple. If my PM is not from IT I could get away with saying I need 5 days to do a simple java program that does I/O which is fulla-crap. Now it's true you need to know only when managing people and not during an interview, but what if you ...


3

This is a very broad question and right on the verge of being off-topic as both too broad and an opinion poll. Having said that, I've been in this position and it is daunting. The only advice I would give you is this- Do. Nothing. The worst thing you can do as a new manager of an incumbent team is wade in on an obvious witch hunt making snap decisions and ...


2

Clearly demonstrate how you have contributed to the company's bottom line. Be open to constructive dialogue. This might be the first time they become aware of the work that you're doing or that you want to contribute more and be paid more. Have another opportunity ready.


2

The requirements for a project manager always go out from a project profile. Check DPCI for instance. You can use risk profiles as well. More technical experience: Small - you just won't have enough administrative tasks to do, so you better write code with others. You can always back your guys in case sick leaves. And sometimes it's just simpler to fix ...


2

While I have seen projects completed successfully with non-technical PMs, I've also seen a lot of disasters. (That's one of the pushes I had to move from programming to PM.) One point I have not seen mentioned in the other answers, is the Big Picture aspect of the project. While we hope we have people we can rely on to give us accurate information (or best-...


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